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Full text of "Charity Hospital Report 1939-1940"

Jform of (§iU or Pequesit 



I give (or bequeath) lo Charity Hospital of Louisiana at 
New Orleans, iSie sum of 



.„ Dollars, 

to establish a Bed "ENDOWMENT FUND." 



It is agreed that this fund is to be judiciously invested and the 
revenue therefrom applied solely to charitable work in said institution. 



Full Name 



Date 

/iddrgss 



Resolution Adopted July I9th, 1926. 

The Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital of 
Louisiana, New Orleans, does hereby agree and bind itself and its 
successors in office as a condition precedent to the receipt of 
donations or bequests to the "Bed Endowment Fund," to put aside 
unimpaired in perpetuity and invest said funds, and keep same 
perpetually invested in high grade bonds or other interest bearing 
securities, and the interest earned thereon to be dedicated and used 
exclusively for the furtherance of its charitable work. 

[iii] 



Bed "ENDOWMENT FUND" 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

ADELE EMILY ROESSLE 

New Orleans 

1926 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

JOHN FLEMING 

New Orleans 

1938 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. P. A. CAPDAU 

New Orleans 

192S 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. HATTIE McMARIUS 

GAUDET 

Thibodaux, Louisiana 

1938 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 
LIONS* CLUB 
New Orleans 
1929 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

BERNARD GEO, HOLSCHER 

New Orleans 

1938 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

DR. J. A, HARDIN 

Chicago, Illinois 

1930 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. YVETTE ARON 

New Orleans 

1938 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

ALLEN J. ELLENDER, Jr. 

Houma, Louisiana 

1934 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MISS MARIE ANTOINETTE 

BERNARD de MONTIER 

New Orleans 

1938 


Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

MRS. MOLLIE MORGAN HORN 

New Orleans 

1936 




Memorial Bed 

Endowed By 

GEORGE M. READ 

Slidell, Louisiana 

1936 





I IV I 




1. Auxiliary Buildings comprising Laundry, Garages, Warehouse, Power Plant, Ice House, Animat House, Incinerator, Auto 
Repair and Paint Shop. 

2. Hutchinson Memorial Building, School of Medicine, Tulane University. 

3. New Main Hospital Building. 

4. School of Nursing and Nurses' Residence. 

5. Sisters' Home Building. 

6. Lapeyre Miltenberger Home for Convalescents. 

7. John Dibert Tuberculosis Hospital. 

8. Delgado Memorial Charity Hospital. 

9. Richard Milliken Memorial Hospital. 

10. Louisiana State University School of Medicine. 



BOARD OF ADMINISTRATORS 
Years Closing June 30th, 1939-1940 



fHis Excellency Governor Earl K. Lonc, Ex-Officio President 

Bis Exceli^ncy Governor Sam H. Jones, Ex-Officio President 

Chas. J. Rivet, Vice-President 

B. C, CaSANAS J. A. DUMAINE 

T. J. Darcy Dr. W. D. Phillips 

John L. Diasselmss Richard R. Foster 

Dr. E. F. Salerno 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 

Jules A. Dumaine, Chairman 
B. C. Casanas Richard R. Poster 



HOUSE COMMITTEE 

John L. Diasseluss, Chairman 
T. J, Darcy Richard R, Poster 



MEDICAL COMMITTEE 
Dr. E, P, Saij:rnO, Chairman 

Richard R. Foster Dr. W. D. Phillips 



Fred, W. Matthews 
Seeretary-Treasurtr of the Board 



tTerm eiplred May U. IWO, 

t v] 



HOSPITAL STAFF 
Year Closing June 30, 1940 

George S. Bel, M. D., Director 
(Died Auirust 10th, 1939) 

Roy W. Weight, M. D., Assistent Director 
(Appointed Director to succeed Dr. Bel, August 14th, 1939) 

Chas. B. Orom, M. D. } a ■ » . ti .. 

J. O. Weilbaecher, Jr., M. D. J Assistant Directors 

PATHOLOGICAL LABORATORIES 

RiGNEY D'AuNOY, M. D., Pathologist and Director of Laboratories 
(Resigned August 22nd, 1939) 

Emma S. Moss, M, D., Pathologist and Acting Director of Laboratories 

X-RAY, RADIUM AND DEEP THERAPY 

Amedee Geanger, M. D., Director 
(Died December 15th, 1939) 

James B. Ikwin, M. D., Acting Director 
(Resigned June 30th, 1940) 

Edna W. Brown, M. D., Acting Director 



HEART STATION— ELECTROCARDIOGRAPH LABORATORY 
EiCHABD Ashman, Ph. D,, Director 

James L. Gouaux, M, D., Assiitant Director 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 
Mabiok B. Stewart, Supervisor 



SOCIAL SERVICE DEPARTMENT 
Beatrice Hoijge, Director 



RECORD LIBRARY 
Euzabeth B. Gheenwalo, Registered Medical Record Librarian 

NURSING DEPARTMENT 

Sister Stanislaus, R. N., Sc. D., Director of Department 

Sister Mathilde, M. A„ Assistant Director of Department 

Sister Henrjetta, R. N., M. S., Director of School of Nursing and 

Nursing Service 

[viJ 



CHARITY HOSPITAL RESIDENT STAFF 
July 1. 1939— June 30, 1940 



MEDICINE 
L. S. U. Vnii^ Tulane Unit— 

J. E. Blum, M. D.~4th year R, A, Wise, M. D.— 3rd year 

D. E. Fader, M. D.— 3rd year R. C. Kelleher, M, D, — 2nd year 

R. E. Selsek, M, D.— 3rd year J, A. Chustz, M, D.— 2nd year 

A. W. Cannava, M. D.— 2nd year P. J. Thomas, M. D,— 2nd year 
W. G. Fisher, M. D. — 2nd year A. M. Gordon, M. D. — Ist year 
C. H. Rabinowitz, M. D. — 2nd year C. C. Joseph, M. D. — 1st year 

tM. J. BoGGS, M. D. — Ut year J. A. Magne, M. D. — 1st year 

W. A. GAI3REATH, M. D. — Ist year M. E. St. Martin, M, D.— 1st year 
J. D. Garcia, M. D. — 1st year 

B. A. Goldman, M. D. — 1st year 
p* W. Horn, M. D. — 1st year 

Independent Unit — 
H. J. DUPUY, M. D. — 1st year 
H. M. Taylor, M. D. — 1st year 



PEDIATRICS 

W. J. CuAwroRD, M. D. — 2nd year E. h. Levert, M. D. — 2n(] year 

A * S. Ai-BRJTTON, M. D. — 1st year B. N. Wexler, M, D.-— 2nd year 

B. J. LaCouh, M. D. — 1st year C. B. Burns, M. D. — Ist year 

DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHILOLOGY 

M. E. KoPFLEK, M. D, — 2nd year G. H. Smullen, M. D,— 1st ; c-a 

NEURO-PSYCHIATRY 
tS. A. Goodman, M. D. — lat year 



SURGERY 
F M. Sandiper, M. D.-^th year S. D. Mcrray, M. D.— 4th year 

tN. A. Cox, M, D.— 3rd year F. T. Gidman, M. D.— 3rd year 

L ' J. O'Neii., M. D.^rd year D. S. Condie, M. D.^ — 2nd year 

r' p. Hays, M. D.— 2nd year R. G. Holcombe, M. D.— 2nd year 

d" B. Williams, M. D. — 2nd year L. J. Kleinsasser, M. D. — 2nd year 
A* E. Ram ay, M. D.— 1st year J. A. Ravenel, M, D, — 2iid year 

J " L. DiLeo, M, D. — Ist year H. Bethea, M. D, — 1st year 

p p\ GiuPi'RE, M. D. — Ist year R. C. Day, M. D. — 1st year 

C H. MosELY, M, D. — 1st year J. A. Sabatier, M. D. — 1st year 

G. F. ScHHOEDER, M. D. — Ist year 

Independent Unit — 
L. B. Leggio, M. D. — 4th year 
M. C. Kolzun, M. D.— 3rii lear 
H. E. Nelson, M. D.— 1st year 
L. C. Delery, M. D.^lst year 



tBesignod. 



[ vii 1 



RESIDENT STAFF— Continued 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 

H. Leidenueimer, M. D.— 2nd year tG. A. Vakino, M. D.— 3rd year 

tR. E. Montgomery, M. D.— 2nd year w. K. Gauthier. M. D.— 2nd year 

G. K. Rogers, M. D.— 2nd year Abe Golden. M. D.— 2nd vear 

J. W. Williams, M. D.— 2nd year O. V. Prejean, M. D.— 2nd vear 

D. W. GoijiMAN, M. D.— 1st year W. P. Thomas, M. D.— 2nd year 
B. J. Lehman, M. D. — lat year J. R. Jones, M. D. — 1st year 

J. E. Warren, M. D.— 1st year E. W. Nelson, M. D.— Ist year 

J. D. TA1.B0T, M. D. — 1st year 
tndepetident Unit — 
W. V. Treadwell, M. D.— 1st year 

ORTHOPEDICS 
I. Cahen, M. D.— 2nd year M. M, Bannerman, M. D. — 2nd year 

I, Redler, M. D.— 1st year M. P. Knight, M. D.— 2nd year 

J. J. SoFRANEC, Jr., M. D.^lBt year R. W, Augustine, M. D. — 1st year 

J. T. Jacobs, M, D. — ^Ist year 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 
N. C. Parrington, M. D.— 2nd year J. H. Saundeks, M. D.— 2nd year 
J. T. Simmons. M. D.— 1st year L. S. Gamble, M. D.— 1st year 

J. C. SuARES, M. D. — 1st year 

OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY 
tV. H. BoYO, M. D.— 2nd year J. D. Magee, M. D.— 2nd year 

A. V. Hays, M. D.— 2nd year W. Finklestein, M. D.— 1st year 

N. h. Habt, M. D.— lat year 

tndepe ndeii t U ttU — 
R. D. Ellen DEH, M. D. — 2nd year 

UROLOGY 
W. D. Beacham, M. D.— 3rd year G. Vandama, M. D.— 2nd vear 

E, Maltry, M. D.— 2nd vear E. F. Kelly, M. D.— 1st year 
G. W. ViCKERY, M. D.— 1st year M. Survey, M. D.— Ist year 

/ ndepende nt V ttil — 
M. E. Fatteb, M. D.— Ist year 

RADIOLOGY (All Uidts) 
H. C. Jensen, M. D.— 2nd year J. R. Riley. M. D.— Ist year 

D. R. Mattingly, M. D.— 2nd year H. FiSHBEiN, M. D.— Ist year 

PATHOLOGY lAU Uvits) 

E. Pauk, M. D. M. M, Rice, M. D. 

DENTISTRY (All Units) 
C. C. Brucker. D. D. S. 



ADMITTING PHYSICIANS 
C. L. Blumstein, M. D. E. T. White, Jr., M, D. 

J. G. Marsh, M. D. J. a. White, M. D. 

J. E. TouPS. M. D. M. SuTEU, M. D. 

to. M. Warren, M. D. 



tfieslKntd. 

I viii J 




Emergency EaUance Showing Ramp for Ambulances. 



CHARITY HOSPITAL INTERNE STAFF 
July 1, 1939^ June 30, 1940 



Hartwig Moss Adler, M D. 
'Benjamin L. Allen, M. D, 

Alyce Mary Arretteig', M, D. 

Donald W. Atcheson, M, D. 

Samuel Carter Atkinson, M. D. 

Landon Haynes Bachnnan, M. D. 

Soddie James Barkett, M. D, 

Georpe l,ee Bash am, M. D. 

John Dillard Battle, Jr., M. D. ( Path) 

Kenneth Harold Beach, M. D. 

Philip J. Bepley, M. D. 

Phillip Aufirustus Be!legg-ie, M. D, 

John Henry Bergman, M. D, 

Thurmond DeWitte Boaz, Jr., M. D, 

Ralph Louis Bourgeois, M. D. 
•Fred Austin Boyd, D. D. S. 

David Van Brown, M. D. 

Charles Russell Brownell, Jr., M. D, 

John Paul Burton, M. D. 

Fred Arthur Butler, M. D. 

Edmond Chadwick Campbell, W. D. 

Edward E. Cannon, M. D. 

Vincent Heni-y Carstensen, M. D, 

Eustace Vitor Chauvin, Jr., M. D. 

James Jennings CJeckley, M. D, 

Claude C. Craighead. M. D. 

Alfred Penn Grain, Jr., M. D. 

Lester Cain Crismon, M. D. 

Horace Milton Dal ton, M. D. 

William Andrew Daniel, Jr., M. D, 

Ernest George DeBakey, M. D. 

Bernard M. DeMahy, M. D. 

Jack Drury DeMott, M. D. 

Walter Palmer DiaK, M. D. 

James Willard Dowell, M. D. 

Horace Buffmgton Dossier, M. D. 

Vance Johnson Elliott, M. D. 

Ira ChenauU Evans, M. D. (Path.) 

Herbert Ray Evers, M. D. 

John Pleasant Fatherree, M. Li. 

Esmond Anthony Fatter M. D. 

Henrv H. Fineberg, M. D. 

William Joseph Fitzgerald, M. D, 

Leo Jay Flax, M. D. 

Guy Martm Freneis, M. D. 

George Eraser, M. D. 

Alfred Francis Frey, D. D. b. 

Morris S. Fr.edman, M. D. 

TRidore Wilmot Gajan, Jr., M. D. 

Bard Ellis Gardner M D. 

Paul Lionel GetzolT, M. o. 



Harold Raymond Gilbert, M. D. 
George Glenwood Gill, M. D. 

Donald D, Gnose, M, D. 

Israel Ian Esar Gordon, M. D. 

Peter Carl Graffagnino, M, D. 
* Jacob Greenblatt, M. D, 

Vernon LeRoy Hagan, M. D, 

Myron Richard Halsbond, M. D. . 

Robert Kennon Hancock, M. D, 

Edward Mcleod Harrell, M. D. 

James William Headstream, M. D. 

Herbert Dale Hebel, M. D. 

Vernon Medd Henington, M, D, 

Claude Nash Herndon, Jr., M. D. 

Warren Vance Hinshaw, M. D. 

Leon Hodges, M. D. 

Joseph Vincent Hopkins, Jr., M. D, 
*Jack Chenoweth Horner, M.D.(Path.) 
*RuHsell Keaton Horsman, M. D. 

Roy Albert Hulse, M. D. 

Donald T, Imrie, M. D. 

Loui.s Wm. Oscar Janssen, Jr., M. D. 

Allen Jones Jervey, Jr., M. D. 

William St. Julien Jervey, M. D. 

Wilbur Edward Johnson, M. D. 

Gus William Jones, Jr., M, D. 

Roy Arthur Kellv, M. D. 

Paul Kernek, M. D. 

Lamar Louis Lambert, M. D. 

.lames Jack LaNasa, M. D. 

Charles O'Dowd Lilly, M. D. 

Lyon K. Loomis, M. D. 

Lee Hall Lorensen, M. 1). 

Raymond Earl Lovett, M. D. 

Harl D. Mansur, Jr., M, D. 

Frank Xavier Marino, M. D, 

George Harriss Martin, M. D. 

Murphy Patrick Martin, M. D. 

William Kenney Massie, Jr., M. D. 

Milton Mazo, M. D. 

James S. MeCabe, M, D. 

William Mellen McCord, M. D, 

John Francis McGregor, M. D. 

Delbert Wesley McKinney, M. D. 

Francis Claburn McLanc, M. D. 

Justin C. iVIcNutt, M. D, 
Manie McSwain, M. D. 

Edmund Arthur Melvin, M. D. 

Eldon Edward Merse, M. D. 

Floyd Dai-win Miller, M. D. 



• IH'sienpd 



Lix 1 



INTERNE STAFF—Continued 



Max Mayo Miller, Jr., M. D 
t George John Mitchell, M. D. 
Joseph Daniel Mitchell, Jr., M D 
Joseph Marcel Montagnet, M. D. ' 
James Frederick Morton, M D 
Jules Stelly Mottv, Jr., M. D 
Rush Edward NefctervilZe, M. D 
George Burton Neukom, M D 
Roland Edward Nieman, M. D 
Evelyn Beatrice Nix, M. D 
I^onavd Collier Paggi, M. i) 
Julian Gray Parker, M. D, 
Van Sam Parmley, M. D 
Homer Sylvester 'Pamell.' Jr.. M D 
Morris Pasternack, M. D. ' * 

McLeod Patterson, M. D. 
Louis Scowcroft Peery, M. D 
John Luke Pepe, M. D 
Claud W. Perry, jr. M D 
Benjamin James Phillips, M D 
Phtlip Pixzolato. M. D. (Path.) 
Jcseph Winfleld Plauehe, Jr., M D 
*Jo.seph rage Pollard, M. D. 
tElizabeth Balas Powell, m' D 
Norborne Berkeley Powell," M.' D 
Winston Boone Prothro, M D 
Roscoe I^Roy Pullen, M. D. 
Francis Warren Eaerffio, Jr., M D 
Lmns Edwin Rausch, M, D. 
Frederick Louis Reuter, m' D 
George Shackelford Richardson "m D 
Jack Leahy Richardson, M. D. 
Bernard Jay Rike. M. D. 
Howard Emerson Roberts, M. D 
Melville Rosenbusch, M. D 
Georfce Catlett Rowe, M, D 
[rvin Sadoff, M. D. 
Blaise Peter Salatich, M. D. 
Peter Blaise Salatich, Jr., D. D S 
David D ouglas Salmon, M. D. 

•ReBlgncd 

tBeeuQ Intenishij, Jatiuar>' 1, IWO. 



Martin Francis Samson, M. D. 
Marshall Morris Scarie, M. D. 
Raymond Scheff Schear, M. D. 
James Maurice Shargel, M. D. 
Thurman Shuller, M. D. 
Martha Adele Simmons, M, D. 
Courtland Prentice Smith, M. D. 
Francis Dunnington Smith, M. D. 
John Robert Snavely, M, D. 
Robert Sprague Srigley, M. D. 
Alvin Stander. M. D. 
Ray Gingles Stark, M. D. 
Henry Maximilian Stem, M. D 
Sidney Stillman, M. D. 
Frederick Adolphus Stine, M. D 
Bertha-Elvis Stokes, M. D. 
Margaret Elinor Strang-e, M. D. 
Roland Reuben Suran, M. D. 
Garnett J. Sweeney, M. D. 
William Trachtenbcrg, M. D. 
William Wallace Tribby, M. D. 
William Wilier Trice, M. D. 
Joseph John Tritico, M. D. 
James Edward Trow, Jr., M, D, 
Portis Wiis Turrentine, M. D. 
Arthur Vandergrift, Jr., M. D. 
James William Vaudry, M. D. 
WiUiam O^den Vennard, M. D. 
Gretchen Marie Vitter, M. D.(path.) 
Jerome Ander-son Weaver, M. D. 
Henry Clay White. Jr., M. D. 
Francis Record Whitehouse, M, D 
Fred Stewart Whitfield, Jr., M. D. 
Jack Kenneth Wickstrom, M. D. 
Lee Williamson, M. D. 
James A. Wilson, M. D. 
Cyril Thompson Yancey, M. D. 
Anthony Cyril Yerkovich, M. D. 
Reuben Allnutt Zarrilli, M. D. 



[X] 



CHARITY HOSPITAL VISITING STAFF 
July 1, 1939— June 30, 1940 



MEDICINE AND THE MEDICAL SPECIALTIES 



GENERAL MEDICINE 

Consulting Physicians 
•Geo. S. Bel, M. D. A. E. Fossier, M. D. 

L. J. DuBos, M. D. S. C. Jamison, M. D. 

*J. A. Stobck, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Physicians 
O. W. Bethea, M. D. W. a. Love, M. D. 



M. Camfagna, M. D. 
J. C. Cole, M, D. 
Upton Giles, M, D. 
Ben R. Heninger, M. D. 
Sam Hob son, M. D. 
p, H. Jones, Jr., M. D, 
A. L. Levin, M. D, 
J. L. Locascio, M. D. 



M. W. Miller. ^L D. 
L. A. Monte, M. D, 
J. H. MussER, M. ,D 
I. L. Robbins, M. D. 
J. H. Smith, ,Ir., M, n. 
J. G. Stulb, M. D. 
Narcisse F. THinERGK, M. D. 
E. H. Turner, M. D. 



Visiting Physicians 



Owen F. Agee, M. D. 
J. J. Archinard, M. D. 
Juijus Bauer, M. D. 
E. H. Bayley, M. D. 
Robert Beunhard. M. D. 
Emile a, Behtucci, M. D. 
Oscar Blitz, M. D. 
G E. BuacH, Jr., M. D. 
J, S. D'Antoni, M. D, 
K. L, Dickens, M. D. 
J ' c. Ellington, M. D. 
Manuel Gabdberg, M. D. 
Grace A. Goldsmith, M. D. 



Edgar Hull, M. D. 
Sydney Jacobs, M. D. 
D. V. LONGO, M. D. 
Robert C. Lowe, M. D. 
Louis Ochs, Jr., M. D. 
p. l. querens, m. d. 
L. C. Scott, M. D. 
.Morris Shushan, M. D. 
Daniel M. Silverman, M. D, 
w. a. sodeman, m. d. 
C. J. Tripoij, JL D, 
F. S. Williams, M. D. 
Julius L. Wilson, M. D. 



Assistant Visiting Physicians 



AjJCB Baker, M. D. 
G. E. P. Barnes, M. D. 
cIabence a. Bishop, M. D. 
Kermit Brao, M. D. 
Stanley Cohen, M. D. 
Sebron C. Dale, M. D. 
M J. Duffy, M. D. 
KiCHoiJiS K. Edrington. M. D. 
F A. EiGENBROD, M. D. 
Hugo T. Engelhardt, M. D. 
Eabl Foster Evans, M. D, 
Chester S. Fresh, M. D. 

MARCEL J. FORET, M. D. 

yf H. Gn.i-ENTiNE, M. D, 



D. 



Joseph W. Wells, M, D. 



Nathan Goldstein, M. 

D. P. GowE. M. D. 
Joel B. Gr-vy, M. D. 
j, e, h0i.oubek, m. d. 
OzA Joseph LaBabge, M. D. 
J, D. Landry, M. D. 
Louis K. Levy, Jr., M. D. 
J. A. Lewis, M. D, 

Edward deS. Matthews. M. D. 

E. S. Munger. M. I). 
Adolph T. Ogaaud, M. D. 
Henry D, Ogoen, M, D. 
J. 0. W. Rash, M. D. 
Norton W. Voorhies, M. D. 



mjyeeeafi^' 



I xi 1 



VISITING STAFF--Co/ilfnue</ 



PREVENTATIVE MEDICINE AND PUBLIC HEALTH 

Visiting Consultant 
Aldo Casteliani, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Physician 
Geo. W. McCoy, M. D. 

Parasitologist 

J. C. SWARTZWELDER, Ph. D. 



DERMATOLOGY 

Consulting Physicians 
H. E. Menage. M. D. .j. numa Roussel, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Physician 
Ralph Hopkins, M, D. 

, Visiting Physicians 

j" K S^,"''' ^,- R- M. D. Lang, M. D. 

C B K^^^'' W M- Maux)w TZ. M. D. 

C. B. I^NNEDY, M D J. W, TEDDER, M. D. 

yi. r. Van Studdiford, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Physician 
A. J. Italiano, M. D. 



NEUEO-PSVCHIATRY 

Senior Visiting Physicians 
W. J. Otis, m. D. g. F. Roeunc. M. D. 

T. A. Watters, M. D. 

Visiting Physicians 
Lucy Scott Hill M. D. h. Randolph Unswobth, M.D. 

Ehwin Wexberg, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Physicians 

iCA^t' H°T,^'/^- °;, TV "• ^- MacKinnon, M. D. 
tCARL H. Ham ANN, M. D. J. beryi, SumerfieV M. D. 
Julius M. Wallner, M. D. 

'Deceased. 
tRealgaed. 

txlij 



VISITING STAFF— Con(muerf 



PEDIATRICS 

Senior Visiting Physicians 
C J Bloom, M. D. *John Signorelli, M, D, 

MAUn LoEBER, M. D. E. A. Socoi^, M. D. 

R. A. Strong, M. D. 

Visiting Physicians 

Ruth G. Aleman, M. D. F. J. Kinberger, M. D. 

JAMES E. BAirjiY, M. D. E^ F. Nabf, M. D 

RENA CRAWKtRD, M. D. W. C. RiVENBAHK. M. D. 

R E DE 1.A HoussAYE, M. D. Herbert Rothschild, M. D. 

p' c'deVeraes M. D. Suzanne Schaefer, M. D. 

mWill W. Everhart, M, D. Jack E, Strange, M. D. 

J Graubarth. M. D. M. D. Sterbcow. M. D. 

G. R. Williamson, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Physicians 

AUDREY HeINTZ, M. D. JOSEPH D. RUSS, M D 

H p. MARKS. Jr.. M. D. Ai>rian Rodriguez. M D 

DAVID S. Mi[,[J:b, M. D. Cakrom. Smithers. M. D. 

R. P. Veith, M. D. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY 

Visiting Physician 
Nathan H. Polmer, M. D. 



•0eceiiaefl- 



[ zlii J 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



SURGERY AND THE SURGICAL SPECIALTIES 

GENERAL SURGERY 
Consulting Surgeons 
J. M. BATCHEIX)R, M. D. *Madrice Gblpj, M. D. 

MuiR Bradbukn, M. D. Herman Gessnek, M. D. 

RUBOLPH Matas, M. D. 



Senior Visiting 
G, C. Anderson, M, D 
Emile Bi/)CH, M, D. 
W. P. Bradburn, Jr., m D 
W. R. Brewster, M. D. ' 

0. C. Cassegrain, M. D 
P. L. Cato, M. D. 
Frank Chetta, M. D 
IsmORE COHN, M. D. 

C. Grenes Cole, M. D. 
Joseph a. Danna, m. d. 

1. M. Gage, M, D 
F. C. Hava, M. D. 
Emmett Irwin, m. D. 
P. G. Lackoix, M. D. 
Jerome E. Landry, M, D. 



Surgeons 

L. H. Landry, M. D. 

E. L. Leckeht, M. D. 

Henry Leiden heimeh, M. D. 

Joseph Levy, M. D. 

Shiri-ey C. Lyons, M. D. 

Urban Maes, M. D. 

C. Walter Mattingly. M. D. 

C. J. MlANGOLARHA, M. D. 

Daniel J. Murphy, M. D. 
James T. Nrx, M. D. 
Alton Ochsner, M. D. 
P. A. Phillips, M. D. 
E. J. Richard, M. D. 
J. D. Rives, M. D. 
A. H. Storck, M. D. 



P. A. Boudreaux. M. D 
P. F. Boyce, M. D. 
J. E, Brieree, M. D. 
CUTHBEKT J. Brown, M. D 
E- L. Buck, M. D. 
L. S. Charbonnet, Jr., m. I 
R. J. Chrlstman, M. h. 
T. E. Clements, M. D. 
J. A. Colclough, M. b. 
Pascal L. Danna, M. D. 
M. E, DeBakey, M. D. 
D. H. Echols, M. D. 
Carroll P. Gelbke, M. D 
Cornelius E. Gokman, m. D 
L. J. Hanxkes, M. D 
w. H. Hebert, M. D. 

H. C. lL(iENl.TlITZ, M. D. 

H. R. Kahle, M. D. 
I. W. Kaplan, M. D. 
Samuel Karlin, m. d 



Visiting Surgeons 



John L, Keeley, M. D. 
A. B, Longacre, M. D. 
Prank Loria, M. D. 
H, R. Mahorner, M. D. 
[■W. H. Meade, M. D. 
Waldemak Metz, M. D. 
W. D. Norman, M. D. 
John P. Oaki^ey, M. D. 
Neal Owens, H. D. 
Rawley M. Penick, Jr.. M, D 
A. McK. PoWE, M, D. 
Samuel A. Romano, M. D, 
Sam B. Saiewitz, M. D. 
Warren Hooper Sears, M. D. 
J. F. SiCOMO, M. D. 
J. Kelly Stone, M. D. 
L. H. Strug, M. D. 
Cosmo J. Tardo, M. D. 
Wm. G. Troescher, M. D, 
Richard W. Vincent, M. D, 



Carl N. Wahl, M, D 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 

mVJ.;,.^'^^^5'' ^^- w George B. Grant, M. D. 

Mewiill C. Bkk. M. D. p. m. Hindelang, M. D 

H. A. Davis M. D. Bernard Hochfelder, M. 

VmcBNTE D'iNGiANNi, M. D. David Hyman, M. D. 

FRANK Gambino, M. D. John L. Kron, Jr., M. D. 

A. G. Silva, M. D. 



D. 



•Deceased. 



tRealgned. 



[ siv J 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



ANESTHESIA 

Visiting Anesthetist 

WiLMER Baker, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Anesthetist 

Ln.Y L. DiSMUKE, M, D. 



OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY 
Consulting Surgeons 
J. S. Hebert, M. D. Wm. D. Phuxips, M. 



H. W. KOSTMAYER, M. D. 



p. T. Talbot, M. D. 



Senior Visiting Surgeons 



H. B. Alsobbook, M. D. 

P. J. Carter, M. D. 

John f. Dicks, M. d, 

A. H. GWDDEN, M. D.nnactive) 

Frank R. Gomhjv, Sk., M, D. 

P. Grapfagnino, M. D. 

A, F. Hebeet, M. D. 



Adolph Jacobs. M. D. 
E. L. King, M. D. 
Walter E. Levy, M. D. 
H. E, Miller, M, D. 
T. B. Sellers, M. D. 
H. Vernon Sims, M. D. 
E. R, Waijst. M. D. 



Visiting Surgeotis 



David Adicer, M. D. 
E. E. Arnell, M. D. 
C. F. BELrx>NE, M. D. 
H. G, BuTKER, M, D. 
C. P. Cabibi, M. D. 
Arthur Caire, Jr., M. D. 
Hymen L. Cohen. M. D. 
C. G. Collins, M. D. 
E. H, CouNTiSS, M. D. 
Geo. H. CaoNAN, M. D, 
G. D. Felbner, M. D. 
W, P. Gardiner, M. D. 
Jack S. George, M. D. 

W. F, GUERRIERO, M. D. 

E. R. GuiDHY, M. D. 
W. R. Hardy, M. D. 
J. S. Herring, M. D. 
Katherine Havard, M. D. 

E. L. Zander, 



Alfred Jacoby, M. D. 
C. G. Johnson, M. D. 
Thbo. F. Kirn. M. D. 
M. E. Lapham. M. D. 
J. E. Lindner. M. D. 
H. C. Magee. M. D. 
G. A. MA-i-EK, JI. D. 
Harry Mayer, M. D. 
T. H. Ouphant, M. D. 
Felix A, Pijvnche, M. D. 
J. W. Redixich, M. D. 
Wm. H, Roe ling. M. D. 
Earl C. Smith, M. D. 
M. L. Stadibm, M. D. 
N. J. Tessitore, M. D, 

E. P. Thomas, M. D. 
C. H. Tyrone, M, D. 

F. K. Vaughan, M. D. 
M. D. 



Assistant Visiting Surgeons 



Eugene H. Clavbrie, M. D. 
fJosEPH W. Douglas, M. D. 
A. V. FlLIZOLA, M. D. 
JAMES P. GJLLASPIB, M, D. 

T. A. Glass, Jr., M. D. 
F, R. GoMiLA, Jr., M. D. 
Daniel M. Kinosley. M. D. 
Frank K. Lock, M. D. 
Carroll H. Long, M. D. 
R. E. Moor, M. D. 
Carl F. Moore, Jr., M, D. 

tBoBlgnei. 



M. L. M. Pareti, M. D. 
Roi-AND F, Phillips, M. D. 
P. E. Prouet, M. D. 
R. E. RouGf^LET, M. D. 
Majxolm Schwartzenbach, M, D. 
Melvin D. Stein™, M. D. 
Richard T. Stephenson, M. D 
tJ, A. VELI^, M. D. 
James S. Webb, M. D. 
J, C. Weed, M. D. 
Benjamin Weinstein, M. D. 



[xv] 



VISITING STAFF— Co/Kinuerf 

OPHTHALMOLOGY 

Consulting Surgeon 

Victor Smith, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 
CtiARLEs A. Bahn, M, D. H, F. Brewstesj M D 

Henry Bi-um, M. D, W. R. Buffincton, M, D. 

THEOriORE J. DiMITRY, M. D. 

Visiting Surgeons 
Sam Bergman, M. D. George M. Hajk, M. D. 

Wm. M. Boles, M. D. *pabk Howell. M. D. 

Alex R. Crebbin, m. D. Jonas H. Rosenthai., M. D. 

Paul L. Makks, M. D. Marje Stanbery. M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
F. T. Beatrous, M. D. Wilkeei) C. Carreras, M. D. 

P. W. Renken, M. D. 



OTO-RHINO-LARYNGOLOGY 

Visiting Consultant 

Chevalier Jackson, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 
S-f; Brown M. D. p. e. LeJeune, M. D. 

RH FISHER M n °- f''*^^*^^'^ ^- ^^'■^^'^' ^^- »• 

Va, H 1^ ' l".^i^ Monte F. Meyer, M. D. 

Val H. Fvlhs, M. D. Geo. J. Taquino/m. D. 

Visiting Surgeons ^ 

i', f: *^?^"r^ ^- ^- Joseph Palermo, M. D. 

1^^ B ^^^' M. D. H. AsHTON Thomas, M. D. 

JEA^NE EOELING HanLEY, M. D. E, G. WALLS, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
A, A. Cantu, M. D. r. b. Riehka, M. D. 

TJ. a. LAROSE, M. D. tWALTER TUMAN, M. D. 

ORTHOPEDICS 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 

E. D. Penneb, M. D. h. Theocore Simon. M. D. 

Visiting Surgeons 
RuFcs Henry Ali^dredge, .-il. D. G. A. Caijjwell, M. D. 
G. C. Battalora, M. D. G. K. Logan, M. D. 

Frank Brostrom, M. D. E. H. Maurer, M. D. 

Harry D. Morris, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeon 
J. O. Redoing, M. D. 



•Deceasted. 

tReslgned. 

r xvi 1 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



UROLOGY 
Consulting Surgeon 
W. A. Reed, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Surgeons 
P. JoRDA Kahle, M. D. J. G. Pkatt, M. D. 

Henry Lindner, M. D. H. W. E. Walthbr, M. D. 

Monroe Wolf, M. D. 

Visiting Surgeons 

Hugh T. Beacham, U. D. Rogek Mailhes, M. D. 

EiKiAR Burns, M, D. J. G. Menville, M. D. 

Irving J, Gl/\ssbekg, M, D. Hij^ire D. Ogden, M. D. 

Max M. Green, M. D. E. F. Sharp, M. D. 

W. E. KiTTREDGE, M. D. Gilbert Tomskey, M. D. 

Joseph A, I^Nasa. M. D. EufiENE B. Vickeky, M. 1 

B. M. WiLLOUGHBY, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Surgeons 
fL. B. Centanni, M. D. tP. L. Ramsay, M. D. 

Henry Clay Hatcher, M. D. Wm. W. Watkins, M. D. 



PATHOLOGY 
Consulting Pathologists 
C W DUYAL, M. D. A. V. Frjedrichs, M. D. 

W. H. Harris, M. D. 

Senior Visiting Pathologists 
Kenneth L. Burdon, M. D. Bbla Halpert, M. D, 

Ai-BEKT E. Casey, M. D. Bjarne Pearson, M. D. 

John Connell, M. D. J. E. Schenken, M. D. 

Visiting Pathologists 
Edward L. Burns, M. D. H. J. Schattenberg, M. D. 

Hugh Page Newbill, M. D. Joseph Stasney, M. D. 

Joseph Ziskind, M. D. 

Assistant Visiting Pathologists 
+PLINY A. ALLEN. xM. D. tJ. E. Kbiz, M. D. 

WILHELMINA C. BACHER. M. D. tJOHN F. RyaN, M. D. 

RADIOLOGY 
Senior Radiologist 

•Amedee Granger, M, D. 



xvii I 



VISITING STAFF— Continued 



DENTAL SURGERY 

Consulting Dental Surgeon 
Charles P. Kei.i-eher. D. D. S. 

Senior Visiting Dental Surgeons 
SiDNET L. TiBUER, D. D. S. L. L. Levy, D. D. S. 

Visit! i^ Dental Surgeons 
S. C. AUEMAN, D. D. S. \V. M. NiCAUD, D. D. S. 

^lANCis B. DucASSE, D. D. S. O. RosAiKi, n. n. S. 

A. D. Smith. D. D. S. 



Assistant Visiting 
E, Banks-Williams, D, D. S. 
C. F. Bartele, D. D. S. 
Geo. W. Bouak, D. D. S. 
R. E. BOUDHEAUX, D. D. S. 
Perky J. Booth, D. D. S. 
A. G. Bravo, D. D. S. 
Marion E. Briebre, D. D. S. 
Charles R. Burns, D. D. S. 
Mark O. Carey, Jr.. d. D. S. 
Wm. J. Dardis, D. D. S. 
Stella deBouchei., D. D S 
Abram H. Diaz. D. D. S. 
J. M, Donahue, Jr., d. D, S. 
Richard H. Fleming, Jr., D. D. S. 
Hahey Evans Fodiman, D. D. .S. 
Behtney G. Frick, D. D. S. 
Leon Galatoire, D. D. S. 
E. A. Gamabd, D. D. S. 
W. 0. Goggin, D. D. S. 

t Resigned. 



Denial Surgeons 

R, P.. Giu;enbij4tt, D. D. S. 
0. H. HiMEL. D. D. S. 
Oscar KKietJER. D. D. S. 
Morris H. La iter. D. D. S. 
Wilbur A. Lazarus, D. D. S. 
IAnthony N. Lavata, n. D. S. 
James Guy Mallory. D. D. S. 

VlfT'ttt B. J1.\.RQIIER, D. D. S. 

R. J. Morris, D. D. S. 
Theresa Napolitano, D. D. S. 
Ralph C. Neeb, D. D. S. 
Don L. Peterson, D. D. S. 
H. W, Peterson, D. D. S. 
Virgil A. A. Robinson, D. D. S. 
G. O. Rosado, D. D. S. 
John P. Schibo, D. D. S. 
Harold F. Smith, D. D. S. 
Fred J. Wolfe, Jr., D. D. S. 
H. S. Zimmerman, D, D. S. 



I xviti J 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 19 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 



July 11, 1940 
To the Board of Administrators of 
The Charity Hospital of Louisiana at 
New Orleans, Louisiana. 
Gentlemen: 

1 herewith sutjinit the Annual Report of the Charity Hospital of Louis- 
iana at New Orleans for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1030 and ending 
June 30th, 19M. 

The year ending June 30, 1940 was outstanding in. the history of this 
institution. DurinE this period the new hospital group of buildings was 
completed and equipped at a cost of approximately $12,7.'50,OOO.UO. The main 
bujlding is (he largest and best equipped and capable of accommodating 
more patients under one roof than any other hospital. 

This movinjj began July 1st, 1939, and on January 4lh, 1940, we had 
moved ail departments, wards and patients, 

The flew Nurses Home was occupied on December 28th, 1B351. This 
is 3 14-story building, located on Claiborne Avenue, very tasteftilly and 
heautifuliy furnished, with a librarj', lounge, four reception rooms, class- 
room,'?, offices, post-office, twenty-nine bed rooms on each floor from the 
second to the tenth floor, with a dinette and a smoking room on each floor. 

After it had been duly considered and passed by the Board of Admin- 
istrators, the meal ticket system was put into effect, at Charity Hospital, 
and the following notice was sent to all department heads: 

"It was decided by the Board of Administrators, at their last 
meeting, April 3r(l, IWO, that meal tickets be issued by the Sec- 
retary-Treasurer with the semi-monthly pay envelopes to everyone 
allovved meals at Charity Hospital. 

That all noa- medical employees be allowed only one meal daily, 
e.\cept non-raedical employees earning $100.00 per month or more, 
who shall receive no meal whatsoever. 

That all resident employees will continue to be served three 
meals daily. 

This plan will be put into effect May Isi, 1940", 

gome changes and innovations put into effect during the year were: 

A, Post Office was opened on the Main Floor, thus relieving the 
„ j.gtary-Treasurer's office of the distribution of the mail. 

A Central Supply Service was inaugurated— its objective lo give tiuick 
J efficient service to tmth doctors and nurses. This service was estab- 
r<hed when we brought Mrs. Alma Buck down from Milwaukee where she 
had established such a service there, Mrs. Buck remained with us from 
4 leust 1939. until April 15th. 1940. when she resigned to return to Mil- 
waukee, in tact Mrs. Buck had only been loaned to us for this purpose. 
Central Service is made up of ten units, the key unit is on the twelfth 



20 CHARITY HOSPITAI^19 aa-l!J40 

floor, with a dispensing unit on each of the ward floors. All sterile mater- 
ial is cared for and dispensed to the various floors from the twelfth floor. 
There is a graduate nurse on duly at all limes She docs not leave the 
unit, all errands being done by rae-ssengers. 

On January 29th, 1940. a Social Worker was assigned to the Admitting 
Room, at my request. The object o( placing her there was to keep out all 
those patients who apply for relief and lodging who are not ill and to take 
care of any problems which the Admitting Physicians do not consider 
hospital cases. Although I fee! that one Social Worker in the Admitting 
Room is doing splendid work, this is not sufficient, and we should have two 
or three workers there at all times, particularly during the day. 

There are two men in the Admitting Room, one designated as Admit - 
tmg Officer and the other as Supervisor in the Admitting Room. Their 
duties, among other things, arc investigating the financial set-up of 
patients applying for admission to the hospital. 

On January 9th, IMO. the Discharge Desk was established as an aceess- 
ffy wiut.to the Record Lifirary. All patients are officially discharged from 
the ho.spital through the Discharge Desk, and the patient is furnished with 
a slip, written by the d<Krtor, giving pertinent information including diag- 
nosis, recommendations for further treatment, and it necessary referrinE 
patient to Social Service, 

'-'^"'« ''Ppointment system was inauKuratcd. and on September 29tli, 
1939. the foUfiwing notice was sent to each member of the Visiting Staff: 

"It has been decided to establish in the hospital a combined 
ward and clinic record for each patient. The unit record would 
thus contain in chronologic order all important notes concerning 
each visit that the patient may make to the ward or clinic. 

In order to facilitate this and also to reduce congestion in the 
clinics, it is deemed wise to establish an appointment system for 
clinic visits. We therefore ask that, beginning Monday, October 
2nd, 1939, you kindly designate to the attendant the date on which 
you wish your clinic patient to return. We shall attempt to limit 
all clinic visits to this appointment system, except, of course, in 
instances where the complaints of a patient would justify immediate 
action". 

A Lounge for Visiting Staff was established on the first floor, with ade- 
quate telephones and comfortably furnished. 

Dibert and Colored Tuberculosis clinics were opened and the cottages 
for cc»lorcd tuberculous patients were closed and the patients moved to the 
second floor Nurses Old Home. 

■ u^^'^ Independent Unit was put into effect and is functioning smoothly. 
T'^ . *«* Independent Clinics opened. The Board of .Administrators passed 
the following resolution: 

"Th^ Board reiterates its previous action that doctors who have school 
connections are required to accept bed assignments, as designated by their 
respective schools". This was done as many member.'! of the Visiting Staff 
were on the Independent .Staff and were holding teaching positions with 
the schools. 

At the regular monthly meeting of the Board of .Administrators, June 
17th, 1940, the following action was taken: 




Ambulance Fleet and Crew. 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 21 



"... that appropriate charges be made for all emerRency treatment 
rendered to persons other than the poor and destitute in accord- 
ance with charges in other first-class hospitals, including physicians 
and surgeons fees". 

The system of having Senior Internes was re-estabiished. Under this 
plan there will be a Junior and a Senior year, a larger number of Junior 
Internes being selected than Senior Internes. Residents will be selected from 
the Senior Internes. This plan will not disturb the system of Residencies 
as now fuKCtioning. 

The Board of Administrators approved the recoonraendatiou of the 
Medical Advisory Committee for the institution of a. Fact-Finding Com- 
mittee. 

I feel that the patients at Charity Hospital are now receiving better 
meals, better served and more tastily prepared, due to the increase in the 
number of dietitians. We now have thirteen dietitians and have had this 
number since March 1910. On July 1st, 1939, we had eight dietitians. 

The hospital has functioned since the death of Doctor Amedee Granger 
without a Director of the X-Ray Department. Both Doctors J. B, Irwin, 
who was Acting Director until June 1st, when he resigned, and Dr. Kdna 
Brown, present Acting Director, have done splendid work in that depart- 
ment. 

Dr. Emma Moss has beea Acting Director of the Department of Path- 
ology, and she is to be commended on the excellent manner in which this 
department has beea mn, 

I recommend that both positions be filled by permanent, qualified 
doctors, certified by their various lioards, as directors of these two important 
departments. 

I also recommend that we establish a shop for making braces and 
orthopedic appliances here in the hospital, and that a full-time man, familiar 
with this type of work, be employed. 

I further recommend that the White Clinic be opened. That we have 
more beds for colored tuberculous patients. I feel (hat one of the old 
buildings- preferab5y the White Female Building, could be use as a Psycho- 
pathic Unit. 

I sincerely hope that adequate funds may be procured to operate the 
hospital as it should be, especially increasing the numiier of graduate 
nuTse.'i as we feel that we need four hundred more than at the present titne. 
J particularly in view of the fact that Charity Hospital has just been 
awarded a full rating by the American College of Surgeons, and wo hope 
to live up to the standard thus set. 

I believe a system of "zoning" of state hospitals would relieve conges- 
tion at Charity Hospital at New Orleaiu}. At the present time, we get 
natients from Slireveport, Monroe, Lafayette and Alexandria, and I fee! if 
there was some sort, of a "zoning set-up", which would definitely state which 
^ectioti of the state was to be taken care of by the various state hospitab. 
this congestion would be eliminated. 

I recommend that a Chief Engineer be appointed at the earliest possible 
time. This is one of the most important positions in the hospital, and 
should be held by someone thoroughly familiar with the mechanical set-up 
of the building, as the entire hospital cannot operate efficiently unless 
this department is functioning properly. 



22 CHARITY HOSPITAI^1 939-1940 

I wish to take this opportunity to tliank the Sisters of Charity for their 
uitfaiUng interest, splendid co-operation and untiring labor. 

I want to express appreciation to the Deans of the two medical 
schools. Dr. B. I. Bura-i, Louisiana State University, and Dr. Max Laphaui. 
Tulane University, They have worked with us and have thus helped to 
create a closer harmony between the hospital and the medical schools than 
has ever existed before. 

To the Visiting, Resident and Interne Staffs, my sincere thanks for 
their loyalty and splendid support. 

The ladies of the Needlework Guild have, as always, given of their 
very valuahle time, and we are grateful. 

To the Board of Administrators I express my appreciation for their 
guidance and loyal support, and I am deeply grateful to my two A.ssi.stant 
Directors, Doctors J. 0. Weilbaecher, Jr., and C. B. Odom for their whole- 
hearted assistance. The Secretary. Treasurer, Mr. Fred W, Matthews, Heads 
of all Departments, my secretaries, and the entire personnel of the hospital 
nurses, and workers in aU departments, all have my deepest gratitude for 
their loyalty, devotion and wonderful co-operation. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ROY W. WRIGHT, M. D.. 

RWW:HL °'''^'*'''- 









tH- 


TABLE t 
DOOR SERVICt 














1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


Admissions _ 


42,636 


45 ,483 


48,077 


56,437 


67,952 


70.504 


58,030 


52,863 


58,899 


63,852 


Hospital Days 


049,360 


767,261 


797,760 


769,503 


1.015,172 


1.079,322 


994,367 


662,629 


707,055 


830,068 




Discharges 


39,669 


42,371 


45,200 


51 ,793 


61,630 


66,S63 


55,679 


49,473 


65,785 


60,000 


OUT-PATIEKT CLINICS 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/3S- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


No, of Visits 


276,462 


318,735 


349.038 


402,221 


473,986 


468,512 


354,717 


349,638 


404,996 


463 803 






TABLE II 

MATERNITY CASES 

IN-DOOR SERVICES 




1030 


1031 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


No. Admitted 


2.072 


2,629 


3,266 


3.453 


3,806 


4,045 


4,098 


4,815 


6,448 


6,833 




OUT-PATIEKT CLINICS 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1 /38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 

6/30/40 


Total No. of Visits 


10,179 


12,044 


13,853 


16,046 


16,978 


17,724 


15,596 


15,688 


19,005 


20,811 



» 

H 
O 
H 
O 
W 

o 

w 



t9 



TABLE III 

PEDIATRICS 

OIJT-PATIEHT SERVICES 



No. of Visits- 



1930 



13,910 



1931 



18.955 



1932 



22,348 



1933 



26,251 



7/1/34- 
6/30/35 



23,462 



7/1/35- 
6/30/36 



22,332 



7/1/36- 
6/30/37 



16,379 



7/1/37- 
6/30/38 



15,796 



7/1/38- 
6/30/39 



16,270 



7/1 /39> 
6/30/40 



18,914 



TABLE IV 
VENEREAL DrSEASES 
OOT-PATIENT CLINICS 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


No. of Treatments given 


37,277 


48,434 


61,625 


74,631 


83,000 


88,186 


72,707 


72,050 


88.603 


125,277 


TABLE V 
X-RAY AND RADIUM THERAPY 




1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


No. of X-Ray treatments 
given 


538 


1,039 


6,975 


11 ,924 


18,499 


15.717 


14,317 


16,084 


22,283 


27,607 


Radiutn 




.„. 1.148 980 774 434 298 258 



a 
> 

H 

^< 

a 

o 

CO 

H 
>■ 

r 

to 
<o 



to 

o 



TABLE VI 



. 7/1/34- 1 7/1/35- 1 7/1/36- I 7/1/37- I 7/1/38- 1 7/1/39- 
6/30/35 I 6/30/36 1 6/30/37 | 6/30/38 \ 6/3Q/39 6/3q/4g_ 



Pathological Dept, No. of Examinations ^^?'^o« ^ll'S^ 



X-Ray Dept., No. of Plates 

Pharmacy Dept., No. of Prescriptions Filled 

Physio Therapy Dept., No. of Treatments given - 

Social Service Dept., No. of Services given. _ .-_ 

Operating Rooms, No. of Operations performed- 

Number of Accident Cases 

Laundry, No, of pieces laundered 

Engineering Dept., No. calls for Repairs, etc 



65,-J29 
181,804 

69,998 
128,364 

27,818 

41.747 
10,266,132 

14,000 



73.823 
16,5,953 

71,460 
160,798 

25,027 

40,624 
10,454,437 

11,760 



209.198 
68 ,280 

144,366 
57,021 

117,839 

22,319 

42,798 

10,183,561 

12,000 



226,316 
67,269 

153,494 
49.472 

108,000 

21,644 

43.625 

8,898,349 

7,300 



282,680 
93,968 

158,141 
55.196 

119,772 

18,095 

44,957 

12,;«4,41M 

10,220 



403,024 
112,936 
163,726 

65,784 
134,637 

29,044 

51,495 
23,113,056 

34,675 









TABLE VII 
PER CAPITA COST 














1930 


1931 


1932 


1933 


7/1/34- 
6/30/35 


7/1/35- 
6/30/36 


7/1/36- 
6/30/37 


7/1/37- 
6/30/38 


7/1/38- 
6/30/39 


7/1/39- 
6/30/40 


Wards_ 

Clinics 


1.53 
.25 


1.38 
.24 


1.31 
.23 


1.42 

.23 


1.24 
.20 


1.27 

.228 


2.01 
.40 


2.27 

.44 


2.5S 
.35 


2.92-1- 
.408-f 



TABLE VIII 
DEATH RATE (Avarage Net) 



1930 



3.0% 



1931 



1932 



2.7% 



1933 



2.5% 



7/1/34- 
6/30/35 

2.4% 



7/1/35- 
6/30/36 



2,6% 



7/1/36- 
6/30/37 



2.8% 



7/1/37- 
6/30/38 



4.4% 



7/1/38- 
6/3P/39 



3.8% 



7/1/39- 
6/30/40 



4.0% 



o 
W 
H 



26 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Year Clotino June 30, 1940 

B£D CAPACITY 

White Mate ._ 635 

White Female ..V ' '_' "78 

Colored Male 472 

Colored Female " ' 670 

Children- -.1"." " '.'I."""I 306 



'^°**'L . 2,861 

General Medicine _ ^Vl^'' "^±1"^ ll^ 



Pediatrics . 



232 232 464 

Neuro-Psychiatry.:: H f^ ^34 

Dermatology...... S| ^ ff 

Contagious Diseases,.. -14, tt ti 

TubercuJosis „^* S° J^ 

§rn:^o\o^.r"-"- -■"■--■ ----------- ^^ 2^^ ^^ 

UroloKv - "7 117 234 

Obstetric - - " 78 155 

^yf-Ear.Nos'randThVoat:".:::::-:':-;--- ^7^ ^H fiH 

Radium"^" ^"'"''^'^*"'^^ .— -I.t:: 130 lU 245 

D^taisurgerj^::;:::::::::::::::"";-; u u 11 

Total 

'Temporarily unassigned 



2,861 

'a" 



Remaining at beginning of year (fiscal 1 914 

Admissions.. _ "" ei aeo 

Total indoor patiVnte :::::::: " -.— — w,852 

Dailyaverage I'^fi? 

Remaining at end of year '" " o'lfi 

Accident Cases. * sf'lU 

Totai Hospital Days'.". "" — ----- |^.«S 

Per Capita Cost,..^_. :: - — $2^ + 

Out-Door Clinics—Consultations '.'."'.'..'. V.". ~l ". ". ". ". ..'. 463 ,803 

Out-Door Chmcs— New Cases 31,629 

Ambulance Calls. . ' '"' 8 7S5 

Average time, Ambulance Calls,' Minutw'- ' 27 7 

Discharged qq q^ 

uiea 3 355 

Average gross death rate.'per Vent" "" ' 5 3 

Died within 36 hours of Admission. .. *" " 823' 

Average Net death rate per cent after deducting above 4.0 

Average Time (days) per patient in hospital ... 12.6 

Death due to Cardio-vascular Disease.. 166 

Death due to Malignancy _ * ' ' 319 

Deaths due to Tuberculosis. "I. 309 

Deaths due to Renal Disease 187 

Deaths due to Poison, Accidents, and Violence". " '.'.'....... 236 

Cases reported to Coroner ... 846 




Internes' Lounge — Main Building, 



REPORT OF 
THE TREASURER 



28 CHARITY HOSPITAi:^1939-1940 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



Board of Administrator. J"''' '■ "'■*" 

Charity HospitaJ of Louisiana at 
New Orleans, 

Gentlemen: 

nr^J^l accompanying report does not include comparison with the year 
have mtv.H ''°'}^"^" "■ ^O"!'' '^e of little mterest for the reason that we 
present time "^h*" ^"^ ^V^' "^■" building, starting in July 1939, and at the 
eaulnneH Zl ""^ ^°f ^^ *'"K intended for the White Climes is neither 
MUmSn M "^'^"P'^J- Furthermore, the Delgado Memorial Building, the 
Home w. **^"""«1 Budding and the Lapcyre-Miltenberger Convale^ent 
Home were closed durmg the year. 

and ''''^,^^*P^°'} ^i^"- °^'^^ "^* °f properties rented, leases, real estate owned 
dpt=.ii r!. !u ?^ investments, as the 1039 report covers these items in 
ments attached h'e'I^eto "^'' '"" ^"^ accounted for in the various state- 

Respectfully submitted, 
FRED. W. MATTHEWS 

SECRETARY-TREASURER 



ASSETS 



BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1940 
General Fund 



LIABILITIES 



40,707.35 



Cash on hand and in bank % 

Accounts Receivable 

Delgado Trustees S 981.78 

La State I.'aivcrsity & Agricul- 
tural & Mechanical College, 
Baton Rouge, La.-- 2,281.34 

Loranger Milk Plant 234.00 

St. Martinville School Board, 

St. Martinville. La 250.00 

Prepaid Insurance (Sehedule2)- 14,014.55 



3,7-i7.1*2 



Notes Payable. S 350,000.00 

Tulanc Tunnel Fund - 682.13 

Insuhn Fund - 280.10 

La. State University & Agricultural & 
Mechanical College, Baton Rouge, La, 

Rent— Dec. 1939.. 0,000.00 

Endowment Bed Fund 31. 88 

Wright, E. A. & Co. Contract 2,337.50 

Insurance fund - 1 ,350,00 



Deficit June 30th, 1940. 



S5S,469.02 



360,681.61 
302,212.59 

58,469.02 



Construction Fund— La. 4529-D P. W. A. 



Cash $95,262.59 

Accounts receivable 

Louisiana State University & 
Agricultural &: Mechanical 
College, Baton Rouge, La..»10.090.00 

P. W. A. Wiishington, D. C. . . 50,000.00 60.060.00 



$ 155,352.59 



Contracts payable . ,$ 

Balance due Technical Advisor 

Claims pending — 

Geo. A. Fuller Co. No. 6 "I 

Btwkes Bros. No. 14 } Memo only 

Weiss, Dreyfous & Seiferth I 
Architects J 
Surplus -- 



88,304.011 
2,500.00 



64,548.58 



S 155,352.59 



W 

> 
ax 

m 



IS 

o 






BALANCE SHEET 
ASSETS June 30, 1940 



Cash. 



LIABILITIES 
Bond Liquidation Fund 

* 1«^.526.2G s°,"^,t"«-' 1^' C-P«n'^ « 86.625,00 

— aiirpius 77.901. 2fi 



S 164,526.26 



t 164,526.26 



Dib«rt Endowment Fund 

Sec"uriUes;'(W^itney National" Bank)' "^'^I^.Io Endowment Fund Priaci,^! -.$1,539,653 28 

eustodiaiis, Par Value $1.44.5.000.00 

Book Value »1 .468,836. 13 



81,539,653.28 



>1,539,653.2 S 
Endowment Fund Beds 



Uue from General Fund . c 'ji oo t< i 

Securities owned (Par value f6,60<).00)'.' 6 508 80 I-'idowmi-nt Bed Fund Principal | 



6,508.80 -..> -«, runa i-rmc.pal 1 6,640.68 



6,540.68 



6,540.68 



Lapeyre Miltenberger Fund 
?£t^n '^'"'/^^^'^^'^'"'^'^^^^^^^^ l25:m:U ''""^ '^'"'""' -J 157.772.09 



Slock Owned 
Florida Real 
Florida Real Kstalc fa^e/^illd""; ' ''^;^ 



Florida Real EstaVe'rhirrt'^dh^^^ " 1,000.00 



« 157,772.09 



I 157,772,09 



o 
> 

n 
o 

CO 

•-3 
> 

r 

h- 
<0 
<M 
cc 

I 

I-" 

«s 

lb. 

o 



Special Fund 

„ . $ 51 ia2 66 Unrestricted Funds * ,a^'™=- 

?„t;t^;ut;rPVr-\^luo»55,35aO0)V-:-:: 57,621.50 temporary Fu„ds for de^^natedpurpo^s. 107 276,5- 

Real Estat^729 Henry Clay Ave. ^•f^iyt ^^ 

Taxes on Mitinesota Land anHni 

Stautter Eastwick Legacy — pending IS. B J^^ 

I 126.196.86 ^ 126,196.86 

Insurance Fund a/c Compensation for Employees 
_ . $ 2.:i76.iS0 Insurance fund account - 8 13,(82.2/ 

Dul from General Fund-,- o'ac?S2 

Claims paid in full (since 1934)- --- ^'^^i-H 

Claims paid and pending ii't-va _ — 

$ 13,782.27 $ 13,782.27 



General Bonded Debt 
Amount required for Bond redemption... $8, 737, 000,00 



Bond.s Payable 
Bonds Payable 



$8,737,000.00 



Gran 



,„ Total ...$10,959,293.05 



-1936 Issue -- 84,237,000.00 

-1938 Issue 4,500,000.00 

$8,737,000.00 
Geand Total $10,959,293.05 



H 

> 

G 
» 

pi 

W 

Rl 

O 

w 



32 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS 

GENERAL FUND 

For Year Closing June 30th, 1940 

RP:vENUE receipts Gboss 
Appro PBiATioNB: 

State of Louisiana $ 2,100,000.00 

Fees Adthorized by LBtasLATimE- 

Act No. 12 of 1930— Secretary 17.75 

Act No. 53 of 1882— Action Sales,. 3,649 97 

Act No. 126 of 1924 f Employer's Com- 1 

Act No. 230 ot 1932 ^ pensation and Ua- \ 8,020. 75 

[ bility Cases ... 1 

Act No. 46 of 1932~LicenseE._ 22 02Q 25 

Act No. 87 of 1888— Live Stock Inspection.- 8 ,258 . 25 

S 41,975.97 

Kees ArTMORizED By TPiB Board of Administrators: 

Certificateis— Death and Burial. . _ $ 1 .091 . 50 

Certificatc.s^Insurance _. __ 11 70" 10 

Certificates — Chart records * " 851.80 

fjfficial Undertaker _ 4 OOO 00 

Training .School. I"".." 2[25o!00 

S 19,905.40 $ 
Hospital Income: 

Donations j 638.25 

Interest on Bonds. 42 242.21 

Rents— Various properties." J" I0!079 82 

Reats— 1016-1022 Canal St. 10,600.00 

Royalties and Rents— Wisner lands. . 2Ui 00 

SwiU— Contract _ 635.00 

Savage 14,607.71 

Salary refunds 995.84 

Sundry Sales and Refunds.. .'...'." .3,099.30 "{45.66 

telephone Ser%'ice and Long Distance Calls 1,408.15 

iSadges—Employces 131.00 

Insurance refunds and R. P..JlIlim._.l 1,076^06 "...." 

Social Service Collections 4 , 986 . 99 5 , f 89?49 

Bonds Matured-Milltken.. 4 000 00 

Not^payable 350,000.00 ^ 1 

Bond and Grant Interest a/e balance 4,696.52 

S 444.716.33 $ 83,020.55 
NON-REVENUE RECEIPTS 

Co-Owner's Shippers Press.. $ 5,469.00 

Co-Owner's Union Press 21.03 

TuJane Tunnel Fund.. _ ,5.000.00 

Insulin Fund.. _. .lOO.OO 

Dibert Special Legacy 15.678.98 

Dibert Endowment Fund. 350.367,19 

Miltcnbcrger Fund... ■'5,148.94 





Opebating 


s 


2,100,000.00 




17.75 
3.649.97 




8.270.75 




22,029.25 
8,258.25 


s 


42,225.97 


$ 


1,091.50 

11,707 10 

851.80 

4.000.00 
2,255.00 


$ 


19,905.40 


* 


638.25 
3«, 04 IV. 43 
10,079.82 
10,600.00 
216 00 
635.00 
14,774.04 



Total Cask Receipts ._ S 2,988,782.84 

Total a/c Operating Expenses $ 2 , 245 , 1 51 . 92 



TREASURER'S REPORT 33 

Cash on hand July 1, lOUit.. $ 301,538.70 

% 3,290,321.54 
Cash Disbursements 3,251,414.19 

Cash on hand June .TOth, 1940 $ 38,907.35 

June 30th, 1940 Deficit in Operating Expenses $ 370,318.89 

Tune 30th, 1940 New Kquipment transferred to Inventory a/c 58,392.83 

S 2,673,863.64 



34 



CHABTTY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



STATEMENT OF CASH DISBURSEMENTS 
GENERAL FUND 

For Year Closins June 30th, 1940 

Admixistrative: Gros« 

Salaries — Officers and Clerks S 52,213.55 9 

Office Expenses 4,190.48 

Stationery, Postage and Printing 18 ,'295 !03 

Telephone Operators — Salaries 12,982.84 

Telephone and Telegraph Service 12,330.18 

Advertising proposals 284.55 

Badges — employees "._ 88^00 

Legal Expenses ^^ 402]0X 

Traveling Expenses.. \""""'[" l,104!27 

$ 101,890.91 S 

PR0KES.SIONAL CakE OK PaTIENTO: 

Salaries—Resident Staff $ 85,376,67 t 

^ iirsing Service and Training School 410 ,363 . 60 

baiajie^VV arcl help and Admitting Dept.. 219 ,040 . 48 

Mefhca! and Surgical Supplies 109,565.31 

B.ologieals,. 25. 589. 28 

Apparatus and Instruments 40 491 70 

Salaries— Pharmaci.st and Assistants. 13^432. 18 

Drugs and Chemicals 58 . 726 . 68 

Salancs— Pathological Dept 43 492 62 

Supplies, etc.— Pathological Dept '.. 6 . 15fl . 85 

salaries— Social Service 5(i 422 68 

Expenses — Social Service * 8 '221 68 

X-Ray. Radium and Deep-Therapy— 

X^lT^-y- V-^ --- 37,274.35 

X-Ray. Radium and Deep-Therapy— Sup- 
plies and Eciuipment. 50,785.65 

Record Library— .Salaries... 3.5 462 24 

Record Library— Si(pi>lies and Equipment . I ! 209 . 99 

Mi^ir^f'^.'''"*=^%- 44,481.31 

Heart btation— tialaries. . 8 775 00 

Heart Station— Supplies "'.'.''_ 1 [sm '. 09 

i^hysica Therapy— Salaries 15,403,33 

i hysical fherapy-Supplies and Equipment 2 ,062 . 26 

S 1.274.172.85 S 
Dep.^rtmental Expekseb: 

Ambulance Drivers— Salaries S 10,241.33 $ 

Ambulance Supplies and Repairs 1,459.89 

Housekeeping- Salaries 75 , 780 . 60 

Housekei-ping—Supplies 122,700 41 

Uniforms. _.__ ^ _ 10 12S 19 

Laundry^Salaries.. 1..1.'... 57 [586! 20 

Lauadry^ — Supplies 7717. 14 

Steward's Department: 

Purchasing Agent and Store Room — 

Salaries... 12,114.50 

Dietary Dept, fincl, kitchens)- Salaries. 112,066,34 

Dietary Dept,— E((uipment. _. 6.118.48 

Bakery— Salaries. 5,409. 66 



Operating 
46,407.32 
4,104,99 
20,625.07 
12,982.84 
10,922.03 
298.04 



397 . 46 

1,077.42 



96,816.07 



85,196.67 

397,153.46 

223,395.64 

109,424.51 

25,586.88 

40,359.35 

13,432.18 

67.399.36 

43,492.52 

6,790.90 

58.222.85 

8,892.48 

42,736.68 

60,322.00 

35,462.24 

1,217.49 

55,419.65 
8.755.00 
1,877.74 

17,680.83 
2.176.76 

1,284,995.19 



10,241.33 
2,755.59 

73,071.81 
118,370.29 

10,832.09 

67,431.20 
7,715.14 



12,114.50 

112,315.95 

6,118.48 

5,409.66 



TREASUKEH'S REPOBT 35 



Departmental ExPEwaES— (CoNTiNimD): Gboss Operating 

Bakery— Supplies -- S 11,582.58 S 14,6:18.56 

Ice Plant — Salaries 4,473.00 4,173.00 

rce Plant— Supplies 390.C8 ;190.«8 

Milk and Cream -. 7:5.030.13 7;i,():W.Ki 

Groceries and Canned Goods 93,335.96 88,483.06 

Butter and Eggs_ 34,764.57 34,(58.8.77 

Fruits and Vegetables,-- 45,364.55 45,364. 05 

Meats, Poultry and Fish 107,705.28 107,70;{.4S 

S 791,969.49 t 785,148.27 
Gbnkrai- House and Pbopekty Expense: 
Salaries — Engineering and Maintenance 

Dei>artments - » 231.718.60 $ 227,.'5:j:i ..88 

Light and Power'.::"- - 74,845.00 70,509.84 

^r for heating, - - -- «-719.13 48.646.10 

Fuel Oil for heating ?'?^X'^„'' , ,-,. ..^ 

Gasoline and Lubricating Oils J'i^Ml .,q r^-J 7 

Maintenance. Real Estate '^1 • ^t^ ■ SI "^s ' ^«', i^ 

Machinery and Tools- -_ -- 6,560.38 6.561. 13 

pSing and Steam Fittings- - 5.094.82 ,5.090.30 

Tnsiiranee 1(,495.10 a,470.h/ 

Motor Cars and Trucks-, t'flf-S^ O'^^?'^;"! 

Water Treatment Supplies --- 1,641.66 1.647.^6 

RcntofP-°P-ti- ^^S?K?5 ^li^-Ti 

Cemetery Maintenance i,yn}.zx a , -i-i-i . J i 

S 460,871,70 $ 448.. 51 1.28 

Total Operating Expenses — I 2,615,470.81 

AccotTNTS Receivable: 

Delgado Building - » f ,b ■ o° 

Milliken Building------- ^n'i^ 

Wisner DonaUon Advisory Committee 10™ 

Total » 495.14 

OTHER DISBOBSKMBNTS: „ aaa n(\ 

Shippers Press Co-Owners % 5. 444.00 

Uaion Press Co-Owners- ^II'TX 

Bond and Grant Interest a/c ?^'„2 

Interest on Notes Payable - 200.80 

I oterest on Bonds purchased (Accrued) - . . 2,339.17 

fulane Tunnel Account ^'?ft? ,J 

Sundry, Petty Accounts 106.13 

Sister's Clothmg a/c - 6,000.00 

Total » 18,383.06 

Petty Cash Funds— increases . ^, , , .„ «„ 

^^ ^ Purchasing Agent's-,,! 150.00 

Treasurer's 250.00 400.00 

Purchase of Bonds and Trausrer of Dibert 

Endowment Funds ♦ 571,986,88 

^"to^s'lMr"*' i 27,578.97 

ISiwo.:::''- $ 30.813.88$ 31.144.12 

r-., = rircd to Surplus and Deficit S 58.302.83 

$^TAlGE0SsCaSH DiSBffESEMENTS .$ 3,251,414.19 

Total Accounts Ciiaii«ki. to S^bpi-us and 

Deficit Account •2,673.803.64 



36 



CHARITY HOSPITAI^1939-1940 



CMARITV HOSPITAL OF LOUISIANA AT NEW ORLEANS 

Statement of Cost Per Ward Patient Day and Per Visit Out-Patient 

C I i n i cs 

For Year Closing June 30th, 1940 



Ex- 



Administration Salaries and 

[jfnses .. 

Physicians' Services, Resident 

Staff 

Nursing ' 

Ward Employees and Admitting 

Room 

Medical and Surgical Supplies. .' 

Pharmacy and Biologicals 

Apparatus and Instruments 

X-Ray and Heart Station ! I 

Pathological Laboratories 

Physical Therapy "." " 

Record Library "ll"[[" 

Clinic Salaries ['__" 

Social Service 

Ambulance Service . ."..' 

Housekeeping Department 

Dietary Department 

Laundry. .. 

Steward's Department! ..'.. 
General House and Property. ,. J 

Total Opebatino Expense „ 

ToTAi, Patient Days Trbat- 

Ml;HT__ 



Ward 
Patients 



94,324.92 

76,677.00 
397,153.4(5 

223,395.64 
94,331.89 
93.286.54 
35.818.55 
71,999.40 
35,198.40 
6,889.38 
18,339.87 



53.692.27 
12,996.92 
199,662.51 
118,434.43 
63,218.98 
384,364.93 
447.062.45 



»2, 426, 847. 54 
830.068 



Oct-Patient 
Department 



2,491.15 
S,. 519. 67 



15.092.62 
3.131.88 
,540.80 

.692.02 
15.085.02 
13.968.21 
18,339.86 
55,419.65 
13,423.06 



4, 
31. 



2,611.68 



1,927.36 
1,931.46 
1,448.83 



S 189,623.27 



Total 



96,816.07 

85.196.67 
397.153.46 

223,395.(54 

109.424.51 

96.418.42 

40,359.35 

103,691.42 

50,283.42 

19,8.57.59 

36,679 

.419.65 

.115.33 

92 

19 

.43 

34 

386,296.39 

448,511.28 



55. 

67 

12,990. 
202,274. 
118.434. 

66,146. 



■3 



12,615,470.81 



JJ^7.-^**^^'~*^"t-Patient Clinics. 

Old Cases— Out-PaUent Clinics.. 



31.629 

432,174 



Cost per patient visit.. S^'^ms^* 

Cost per patient day ."'!?].'' _I"""IlI]IIIIim 12^+ 



TREASURER'S REPORT 37 

STATEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION ACCOUNT 

La. 4529<D 

PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION 

Year Closing June 30th, 1940 

Balance July 1st, 19;j<J S 4,062.76 

Receipts During Ybab: 

Prom Bond Lkiuidation fund 2 14, 822. 9Q 

From P. W. A. grant. 750,000.00 964,822.96 

Insurance — ■return premium 4,729.48 

Total balance and receipts - _. . S 973,615.20 

DlBBtJBSEMB^TS DURINti PeBIOD; 

Advertising proposals-- % 301 .9(» 

p. W. A, office— telephone service 259.83 

Consulting Engineers- 9,360.10 

Photographs- 25.00 

Filing Acceptances 6.75 

Salaries — -Inspectors, Clerks of Worlcs, 

Timelceeper and Stenographer - 4,701.78 

Concrete inspection and testing. -. 175.00 

Scientific tests and readings (Settlement) .. 1 , 146.27 

Payment to Technical Advisor 11,500.00 

paid Contractors- 850,815.92 

Total disbursement.^ 878,352.61 

Cash halance June 3nth. 1940— S 95,262.59 

Memo — 

Due by P. W. A. balance a/c grant 

$3.600,000.00--- ----« 50,000.00 

Oue by La. State I'niversity and Agricul- 
tural College, Baton Rouge, La. for pas- 
qaeeway connecting L. S. U. Medical 

Center:..-- -- 10.090.07 

60.090.07 



Total available i 155.352.66 

MbsKO — 

Claims pending: 
Geo. A. Fuller Co. 
Burkes Bros, 
Weiss. Dreyfous & Seiferth, Inc. 



38 CHARITY HOgpITAI^1 939-1940 

BOND LIQUIDATION ACCOUNT 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

For Year Ending June 30, 1340 

Receipts: 

Cash balance July 1, 1939- - % 222,4X3 50 

Transfer from Construction Account { 6,219.30 

From Secretary of State _ 800,000.00 806,219.30 

t 1.028,652.80 

DlSBUBSEMENTS; 

Coupons paid __.$ 248,192.60 

Bonds retired ._ 83,000.00 

Transfer to Construction a/c 214,822.96 

Prof. Hardy Cross 6,219.30 

Payment to Contractors ..'..'... 311,891.78 864,126.54 

Cash balance June 30th, 1940 _ __ S 164,626.16 



DIBERT ENDOWMENT FUND 

STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Year Closing June 30th, 1940 

Receiptb: 

Cash from Mr. Marcus Waltcer, Testamentary Trustee S 400,000 00 

Proceeds from securities sold and/or matured fU ,073 . 44 

Refund from legatees participating in residuary estate for 
their proportionate share of expense of examining and 
photographing certain documents 420.14 

Total receipts. _ % 1,010,493.58 

DlSBtJRSEMENTS: 

Cost of securities purcha!ied_ f 938,836. 13 

Examination and photographs of certain 

documents.., 840.30 939,676.43 

Cash balance June 30th, 1940 . .- S 70,817.15 



TREASURER'S REPORT 39 

STATEMENT OF 

LAPEYRE-MILTENBERGER FUND 
Year Closing Jun« SQth, 1940 

Balance July 1, 193S - $ 21,558.76 

RtfTElPTS: 

Bonds called 9/1/39 @ 105 - 10,500.00 

Interest on bonds - . »-- 5,. '510. 00 

Refund account equipment .. 20.00 

Overage in reserve for costs. - . — 3.38 

$ .'57,592.13 

EqtiJpment • 2, 6] 5. 06 

Maintenance and repairs "^'^fiVn ««-<«« 

]% fee to Custodians of securities 55.12 (5,0.'>4.2e 

S 30.637.87 



STATEMENT OF 

SPECIAL FUNDS 

Year Closing June 30th, 1940 

Balance July 1st, 1939.- $ 67,560.09 

Receipts: 

Temporary funds for designated purposes: 

Mrs. John Dibcrt Legacy — refund S 7.21 

Mrs. Alice Applcgate Legacy 10,000.00 

Mrs. Louise Bart els Thilborger — Bara- 

taria Lands — -Rents -, 117,00 

Mr.'5- Fannie Waldeck Legacy l,,'j8:J.02 

Unrestricted revenues: 

Dividends on slock 17.50 

Rents — No. 729 Henry Clay Avenue 345.00 

Mrs. Louis M. White 500.00 

Mrs. Cora Barton Livingston 186.05 

Mrs. Julia Barton Hunt 2,000.00 

Total receipts ^ - 14,755.81 

Total Balance and Receipts $ 72,315.90 

Mrrjolm Dibert Special Legacy -$ 15 ,781 . 18 

Infantile Paralysis Fund— Sundry charges 

a/c Social Service...- \ '^^2. 55 

Prinker Respirator... / '* ,1,^ 

Social Service Donation Fund- IS). 10 

Secretary's office— Equipment— out of „,„.«! 

Waldeck Legacy ^'^?r?i 

Barataria Property.- , 41.42 

729 Henry Clay Avenue — repairs 7.1. rfU 

Barton Legacy— Certificate 2.00 

Total Disbursements -- -- 21,183.24 

Cash balance June 30th, 1940.- 8 51,132.66 



40 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

STATEMENT OF 

INSURANCE FUND 

COMPENSATrON^HOSPITAL EMPLOYEES 

For Year Closing June SOth, t340 

Balance July 1st, 1939 S 2,138.04 

From General Fund „ 600.00 



8 2,738.04 

Dl»B D RS B ME KTM : 

Claims paid — ■ 

Baessler, O S 20.80 

BaUiet, C. 30.85 

Baumann, E.» , 13.44 

Gauthreaux, E 10.23 

Hernandez, L.- , 18.00 

Kieffer, M 15.84 

Lederer, M _ 26.81 

Rachel, A _ 23 . 44 

Schaff, P 17.20 

Scanlan, B . 4.63 

Thibodaux, H "[\llllll"l"l] 180.00 361.24 



Balance June 30th. 1940 % 2,376.80 



INSURANCE IN FORCE AT CLOSE OF BUSINESS JUNE 30, 1940 



Compsny 



Ihiqueane Uriderwritcra 

Pearl Ass'n Co. Ltd. 

Peari .Wn Co. Ltd 

Prov. Wash. Ins. Co 

AUas .Wn Co. Ltd 

Gen'l Ins. Co. of America.. . 

Agriculturfll Ins. Co. 

Firet NatioBiJ-.- 



Policy 
Number 



Columbia Cas. Co.. 



Columbia Cas. Co — 
New CenL Cas. Co... 

Trinity UaivorMl 

Trinitj* Universal 

Trinit}' Universal 

Trinity Universal 

National Cas. Co. 

.\etnaCas.&Sure^-.- 
Aetna Cas, & Surety.. 



F632 

B501578 

9501603 

222S14 

21782 

F6640 

339S0 

3441AIU07 

CUC276973 

CR19I832 

132275 

E2077U 



Property Ingured 



Hospit^ Bldgs. & Contents. 

Shippcra Press Eldgs 

Shippers Press Contents 

Union Press BIdg 

Union Piesa Bldg._ 

1016-1022 Canal St. - 

729 Henry Clay Ave 

.Auto Fleet 



BJR.-0806603 
39B&53: 
39BHfl7 



Auto Fleet. 



Power Plant, etc. 

Sisters' Home.- _-- 

Elevators 

LessR. P. 1-2-40 

Le3sR.P. 1-17-W 

Less R. P. 3-27-40_ 

5Ioney in banat_ 

Money ii Securities-otfires. 

Fay Roll Money.. _ 

1-&-40 Add!, ftemiums 



Amount 
of Policy 



5,000,000.00 
3,tX)0.00 
5,000.00 
10,000.00 
10,312.50 
50,000.00 
2,500.00 
20,500.00 
25,000.00 
50,000.00 
5,000.00 
20,000.00 



5/10,000.00 



4,000.00 

5,500.00 

40,000.00 

15,000.00 



Kind et Expira- 
iMurance tion Date 



Fire 
Fire 
Fire 
Fire 
Fire 
Fire 
Fire 
. T. & C. 

Lia,&P.D. 

Ida. 

P.G. 

Lia. 



Rob. 
Rdb. 
Rob. 
Rob. 



&-9-42 
8-31-40 
9-8-40 
10-19-41 
2-2&42 
•9-30-42 
11-17-41 
&-25-41 

&-25-41 

&-25-41 

1-6-41 

11-1-42 



5-23-41 

1-5-42 
1-5-42 
1-5-42 



Rate 



3.975 

1.75 

1.875 

2,875 

2.875 

1.42 



112.00 
183.30 
83.75 



Pramium 
Paid 



11,950.00 

87,50 

93.75 

287.50 

29G.48 

1,020.55 

15.00 

684.56 

941.03 

1,837,00 

74.60 

1,863.92 



Agent 



Hartwig Woes Ins, Agcy.. 
Leon Iniin & Co. Inc. . 

Leon Irw'in & Co. Jnc 

Hartwig Moss Ins. Agey., 
Hartwig Moss Ins. Agcy_ 
La, Ins. Agcy of N. O,. . . 

Carrere's Sons 

Mehle Ins. Agcy 



Mehte In. .Agcy... 



Gillis- Winkler 

Mrs. L a Miller. 

Meyers, Wbitty & Hodge . . 

Meyers, Whitty A Hodge. 

Meyers, Whitty & Hodge. 

Meyers, Whit^ 4 Hodge... 

2a00Hartson 

161.75 Moss .Agency 

364.00 Moss Agency. 

178. lOjMoss Agency 



.\ddress 



New Orlrans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 

New Orleans 

New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
New Orleans 
NewOrieans 
New Orleans 



Years 



* Policy dated 6-.5-38 extended 3 years to 9-30-42. 



42 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



SUNDRY CASH DONATIONS 



UNRESTRICTED 
From July 1st, tS39 to June 30th, 1940 



Appreciation Box .... .865,57 

Ayroond. J. P. N. S _,.. 2.00 

Brodenick, Mrs. Anna (In Memory) . 30.00 

Brother I'nivcrsal Jj.OO 

Bryan, Homer ..I.I 20.00 

Bryan, Mrs. I.ottie II_ I I 15.00 

Clinic Donation Box.- rillllllin. 6.68 

Evans, Dr. Logan IIIIIIIIIIII 5.0O 

Faucheaux, Krnest. . In.OO 

Merdcmann, Harry K .. 1.00 

Marugg. Katherine 50J5O 

Oettley. Mrs. Elizabeth ' 35.00 

Pulford, Dorothy Ann 10 00 

Pulford, Frank *" ' 30.00 

Riviere, Goo. . "'"' IS'OO 

Shields, Mrs. James .1 / ;15 00 

Unknown from Baton Rouge, La. .' I _ _ 1 00 

POLICE JURIES 

East Baton Rouge Police Jury, Baton Rouge, La. 1200.00 

St. John the Baptist Police Jury, Mount Airy, La 100.00 

RESTRICTED 
Lucien B. & Katherine Price Foundation tJusulin Fund). .-$500.00 



* 338.25 



S 300.00 



DONATIONS TO CHARITY HOSPITAL 

During 1940 

CHRISTMAS FUND 

General Electric X-ray Corporatiuii $ 5.00 

Elizabeth Parker Trabtic 10.00 

Hyams, Glas & Carothere ... ... 1 5 . 00 

Longino & Collins. 10.00 

Graham Paper Co. _ 5.00 

P. L. Thomsons Co ""' 5.00 

F. !•". Hansen &Bro... . 2.00 

Rex Electric. Inc. .'5. 00 

Godchaux Sugars, Inc _ 25.00 

I. L. Lyons & Co... 10.00 

National Window Cleaning Co.. 5.00 

Southern Surgical Supply Co . -. 15.00 

Hanson-Fiotle Co., Inc..' 5.00 

Surgical Equipment Co 5.00 

Loubat Glassware & Cork Co. . 5.00 

Wootfolk, Huggins & Shober - 5.00 

Surgical Supply Co. 5.00 

Dane&Weil 5.00 

Wm. Henderson - Cash 

Student Body, L. S. U. .Medical School. Cash 



TREASURER'S REPORT 48 



DONATIONS TO PEDIATRICS DIVISION 

Christ Church Cathedral Christinas caady and toys 

Happiness Helpers _ Candy, toys, infants' and 

children's clothing, and en- 
tertainment 

Elks Club .. Candy, toys, clothing, and 

Christmas tree 

Civic Progressive Association .. Candy and toys 

Rabouin Vocational School. ._ Candy and toys 

McDonogh Schools No. 17 and No. 19 Easter baskets 

Mrs. Maspero Easter basket 

Simon Radio Company through the kindness of 

Mr. P. Kenney Two radios 

DONATIONS TO DIBERT 

Nazarene Society Candy on New Year's Day 

and Easter 

St Margaret's Daughters Weekly Bingo Party and Re- 
fresh merits, Easter basket's, 
and Christmas presents 

Dibert Auxiliary -- Donations and I'arty at 

Christmas 
Rev. Mr. Weed -- - -Klowersand magaitines weekly 

SUNDRY DONATIONS 

Bernice Dippacher Scrapbooks 

Cooperati%'c Clubs - Flowers 

Miss Dorothy Dix Goldfish 

Mrs. C. W. Gilmer Clothing, magazines 

Ninth Ward Federated League (Civic) Candy, books 

jjappiness Helpers Tables and chairs 

Various Members of the Charity Hospital Guild.. Clothing 

Miss Esther Heiis - Radio 

Mrs. William G. Helis - Radio 



U CHARITY HOSPITAL^ 193a-1940 

REAL ESTATE 
Occupied by Hospital Group of Buildings (approximately 10 

acres) , _ % 1,889,276.75 

Other Properties „_ _ 538,042.33 



Total as per 1939 report — Pages 69 and 70 $ 2,427,319.08 

Acquired by legacy since: 

1100 Acres — Jefferson Parish adjacent to Wagner Bridge, 

Bayou Barataria _._ 5,500.00 

Totalland values June 30th, 1940 - . S 2,432,819.08 

REVISED INVENTORY 
June 30, 1940 

VALUES 

> . , _ .,j. BrjLDiNO Contents 
Ambulance Building ^old; corner Tulanc Ave. 

Amhr.i?;^''"^'Vj---; * 36,150.16 $ 431.00 

Ambulance Building (new) corner Gravier 

and LaSalle Streets and adjoining Garage 

and Laundry Buildings 266,3.5,5.54 187,051.38 

Auxiliary Biuldings— Comprising cxtensiion to 

old power house and including Ice Plant, 

Metal Shop, Warehouse, Wood Working 

anop, Incinerator, Animal House and At- 
tendant's quarters.. 767,345.17 185.768.35 

Barataria Property. _ , 1,100.00 

Carpenter Shop— Freret and Gravier Streets, 6 , 4S4 . 74 5 , 750 00 

Cemetery— Tool Home 850.00 275 00 

_ Flower Shop _ 875.00 

contagiou.-; Hospital 270,350.00 9,647.21 

Covered Passageways.^^ 4 339 3g 

Delgado Hospital (Closed) '. ." 1 .' '. .' I .' 1 1 1 203 ! 400 ! 38 2 , 200 . 00 

iJibert lubercuiosis Hospital 307,050.84 34.»64.60 

Henry Clay Avenue No. 729 2,500.00 

Internes' Quarters, Tutane Ave. adjoining old 

Ambulance House 94.088.12 1,700.00 

New Mam Hospital 9,208,7:18.05 1, 134,701 . 60 

Medical Building (formerly White Female)... 61,543,63 9.723.76 

McBurney Building— 1016-1022 Canal St.... 50,000.00 

MiUikcn Memorial Hospital. __ 2,54.170.37 7,200 00 

Lapeyre- M Utenberger Convalescent Home _ _ 32 1 , 1 21 . 52 44 , 494 . 1 4 
Nurses Home (oldj now occupied by Colored 

T, B Patients _ 79,959.79 17,890.41 

Nurses Home (new) No. 450 S. Claiborne 

Avenue... 1,010,. 525. 92 64,569.02 

Shippers Press 7,387.00 2,000.00 

Sisters Home— Corner S. Claiborne Avenue 

and Gravier _ 150.610.72 4,762.49 

Refreshment Stand adjoining old Nurses' 

Home Building. _ _ 1,400.85 185.30 

Telephone Office Bldg., L. S. U. entfance, 

Tulane Avenue .., 2,030.46 

Union Press. _ , 19,180.12 

Villere Street Kouae, ,...'.'.'.'.'.'.'." HV./.l'. sioOOioO 

Watchmen's House 25.00 



Total Buildings and Contents .$13,130,582.66 11,713,314.26 



TREASURER'S REPORT 45 

REVISED INVENTORY— Continued 

June 30, 1940 
Sundry Items: 

Fences .. $ SJ51 93 

Granite and Marble — stored on side walk Freret Street 2,000.00 

Spot Light (illuminates main entrance to New Hospital 

Main Building- 391 . 87 

Paved walks and driveways _. 6,634.00 

Oil tank 5,9M.Sl) 

Underground Electrical distribution system 75,303.45) 

Underground drains, sewers, conduits, steam lines and 

trenches .- 40, 108.09 



Total— Sundry Items -. •! 131.383.24 

RECAPITULATION 

Land Values— Hospital Buildings S 1 , 889 , 27(i . 73 

Other Properties 543,542.33 

Buildings -- 13,130,582.66 

Contents 1,713, 3 14. 2() 

Sundry Item.<i 131,38;i.24 

Total 117,408,099,24 



NEW EQUIPMENT 
July 1, t939 to June 30, t940 
NEW AMBULANCE HOUSE 

Enchneering Department; 

fi/27/39 68 Lockers _ S 395.76 

7/ 5/3U 1— No. 73646 AK 12' OscUlating Fan 10.64 

R/26/39 1— No. 1274 L 4 Dr. Letter FiUng Cabinet 20.09 

3/ 7/40 1 — No. 11 Ideal Electric Etcher lit. 88 

Machine Shop: 

«/ 2/39 1 — Toledo No. 999 Super Model Portable 303 . 75 

«/ 8 /39 1 — Prest Weld Cutting and Welding Outfit Complete 106 , 82 
6/14)39 1 — No. 304 Oster Heavy Duty Power Pipe Machine 

Complete 782.04 

1— No. 633 Clamp Ammeter with Case for same 

1 — No. 639 Type No. 2 Industrial Analizer 363.02 

1— Illgette Fan .... 14.94 

l—Typc V-2 Growher No. 110 Volt 

1 ^Armature Stand 

1—200 Coil Winder and Cable 

1 — ^No, 10 Universal 

1 — No. 5 Medget Head 

1 — No. 20 Concentric Head 

1 — Coil Tamping Tools 3/10 x 1 

1— Coil Tamping Tools 5/16 x IJi 

1 — Coil Tamping Tools 3/8 x l}^- - ... 492.77 



6/29/39 
6/29/39 
6/30/39 

7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 
7/12/39 



46 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



NEW EQUIPMENT 
July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1940 
Carpenter Shop; 

6/ 2/39 l~U-36 Thor. Portable Electric Hammer 3/4' capa- 
city 88.20 

6/27/39 I — No. 9 Crescent Saw Table Fig. 327— Direct Motor 
Driven with 5 H.P. 220 Volts 3 Phase 60 Cycle A.C. 
Motor Complole 
6/27/39 1— Approved Safety Guard Saw 

6/27/39 1 — Martising and Boring attachment 490.00 

7/10/39 1— No. 4147 S Champion Electric Forge No. 110 V 

Single Phase.. _ _ 25.4s 

Mai.ntena.ncb Department: 

6/27/39 55 Lockers, 320 10 

1/18/40 2— F-04 Ivory Clocks d.-.n 

Adto Shoit 

3/28/40 1— Chevrolet No. 1383 (New) No. 3 W. a-02 

3/28/40 1— Chevrolet No. 1657 (New) No. 3 W B-03.. 1 ,524 00 

4/ 6/40 1— IngersoU Round Model HBR l-2-!-^]il-!^ Type 30 
Single Stage Air Compressor No. 1468 driven thru 
V-Btlt by 1-HP 1750 RPM 3 phase, 60 cycle 
220/440 Volt G. E. Motor mounted on 35 Gal. 
horizontal Air Receiver - 147.00 

COURT YARD 
3/5/40 FUtcrRocks .__ 10.62 

DELGAOO BUILDING 
Accident Roou: 

10/23/39 1— No. 450 Roger Anderson Automatic Leg Splint... 82,50 

10/23/39 1— No. 450 B-Universa! Foot Plate 22.50 

DIBERT BUILDING 

10/21/31) 23— No. 1002 White Beds 1 

10/21/39 4— No. 1004 White Beds 216 01 

10/21/39 3— No. 983 Irrigating Rds. White Cribs J 

12/21/39 30— No. 2460 S-1746-Chairs 120. 5S 

MILTENBERGER BUILDING 

ElECTHO-CaKDIOGBAPH DKPAriTMKST; 

8/8/39 2— No. 8341 Green 4Dr. Files 87.50 

8/31/39 1—X-Ray File Cabinet O. G. 85.25 

11/10/39 2—0. O. Files with Wobble Blocks 109.00 

11/28/39 2— No. 133 A Stools— Oak 17.25 

1/ a/40 1— No. 7410 C Oak Cabinet 2.45 

1/29/40 4— No. 1658 Add A Unit Transfer Cases 9,00 

2/15/40 1— No. 142 D. S. P. Type Desk 1 

2/16/40 1— No. 45 Posture Chair / . 35.00 

4/17/40 I— No. 1 Olive Green Cabinet. ... 37.95 

NURSES' NEW HOME 

1/ 3/40 23 — Venetian Blinds for East Nursery 

1/3/40 21 — Venetian Blinds for West Nurser>--. 330.26 

2/9/40 36— No. 1 Bronze Smokadors 222.27 

2/27/40 1— No. lis Machine With Water Tank and Handle 

llOV-A. C 253.50 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



47 



9/15/39 
10/ 6/39 



11/30/39 
4/ 5/40 



4/ 5/40 
7/12/39 



7/14/39 
8/ 8/39 
8/12/39 



6/ 3/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/ 7/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/ 8/39 
0/ 8/39 
6/ 8/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/10/39 

6/10/39 
6/10/39 

6/10/39 

6/10/39 
6/10/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 
6/12/39 



NURSING SCHOOL OFFICE 

100 — No. 99 Tablet Arm Chairs 

l_No. 11/6097455-E-l-K Underwood Master. 



POWER HOUSE 

1 — AUpftx Gasket Cutter Complete 

2 — i dia. Zallea Self-equalizing copper expansion joint 
for L. Traverse vrith No. 260 C-S Flangers and 

Model Sleeves 

1 — 3' dia. C-S Flangers and Model Sleeves 

SISTERS' HOME 
1 — 16' A. C. Oscillating R. M. Fan 



NEW WAREHOUSE 

1 — Nevif Scale.. 

Shelving for Warehouse and Special Cabinets, 

Cash Discount Erroneously deducted from Invoice 
dated 7/14/39 Amt. $665.69— This scale is sold 
net cash 

NEW LAUNDRY 

2 — R. G. H. Brass Comp. Hose Bibbs 

3 — Pes. 6x6 Reinforcing Mesh 

1 — Galv. Anthvdro. 

l^Bdle. 3.4 Galv. Metal Lathe 

2 — N. O. Regulation Clean Outs 

1 — Es. Heavy Y 

2 — S. 620 N. P. P. Traps Only 

2— S. 8O0 N. P. P. O. Plug Complete 

2 — ^ Female Solder Bushings 

2 — B-lOlO N. P. Faucets 

1— Extra Heavy 1/16 Bead \ 

1— Extra Heavy San Top Tee / 

F-2223 Modera White S. J. Elongated Bowl 

W No. 110 N. P. Sloon Stor 

Flush Valves W1V-60-R 

Vacuum Breaker No. 2500 

Church Sani-Black Seat Open Front 

Less Cover 

2— China Bolt Caps. Lc-ss Flanges 

2 — No. 32 B. Wusviray Budgetcer Shower Stalls Com- 
plete with Valvesi on R. H. Side White Finish 

1— White Filler Plate for above. . . . . _ 

2— No 32 B-Ditto with Valves on L. H. Side ._. 

I2^y^' Galv. Ells .-- 

6—1* Galv. Ells \ 

4 — lixa Galv. Reducers / __ 

2-^H' Galv. Tees 

2 — 1 ' Galv. Tees 

1— IM' Galv. Tees 

1 — 1 » Bras.s Gate Valve 

1— l^' Brass Gate Valve._ 

1— -i X 1J4 Galv. Tee 



450.00 
93 . 58 



17.15 



93.00 
42,04 



21.18 



645.92 

668.80 



13.18 



3.00 



1.20 
.78 

2.00 
.86 
.38 

8.76 

1.03 



57.44 

100.00 

7.50 

100.00 

.60 

.98 
.15 

.57 

3.42 
.28 



48 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



NEW EQUIPMENT 

July T, 1939 to June 30, 1940 

6/12/3B 12—14' tialv. Asstd. Nipples C to 6' 

6/12/39 6—3/4' Galv. Asstd. Nipples C to 6' 

6/12/30 6—1' Galv. Asstd. Nipples C to 6' 

e/12'39 1— lJix3Ga!v. Nipples 

6/12/39 2— IH' Calv. Shoulder Nippies... 

6/12/39 1— No. 21 Shc-fct Lead 

fl/U/39 4 Pes. 6x6 Reinforcing Wire 

6/17/39 1 Cu. Yd. 1-2-4 Perfect Mixed Concrete.. 

6/19/39 1 Lot Shelving as per plan.. 

6/21/39 2— i^'Galv. Pipe 40'0' 

6/21/39 4—1 X 14 Galv. Tees 

6/21/39 1—1 I 3/4 Galv. Tees 

6/21/39 4—3/4 x ]4 Galv. Tees 

fi/21/39 2— 3/4x Hy^Vi Galv. Tecs 

6/21/39 2—3/4 Galv. Tees 

6/21/39 2— I'Blfc. Plugs 

fi/21/39 2—3/4 Blk. Plugs 

6/21/38 2— H Galv. Ties.. , . . - . 

6/21/39 8— J^ Galv. G. J. X'nions _.. 

fi;21/39 Ig— ^ Galv. Asstd. Nipples C to 4' 

6/21/39 4—!^ Galv. 45 Degree Klls.. 

V^JB *~1J^ S. f}20 N. P. Trap W/"plug 

0/24 /39 l—iyixWi Female Solder Bushing 

6/24/39 1 Pr. B-IOlO N. P. Lav. Faucets 

6/24/39 2— K x K Galv. Reducers 

6/24/39 1— IHx4Galv. Nipples 

6/27/39 127 Lockers.. 

6/28/39 2— 16'- no V A. C. R. & M. Osc. Fans. 

ILy^^ 2—36' M. I!g, Exhaust Fans 

7/10/39 4—36' M. Ilg. Exhaust Fans 

7/14/39 6 F,xhaust Fans. . _ 



1.02 

.13 

2.36 

16.05 

728.00 

2.24 



1.79 



1.18 
1.13 

.51 
.35 



3.70 
741.04 
42.37 
337 . 90 
675.80 
179.32 



NEW HOSPITAL BUILDING 

Miss Bell's Office: 

??'IH/^^ ' f'^'^*^ Overstuffed Living Room Suite 

10/11/39 1 Rocker 

10/11/39 1 Fiddle Back Walnut Desk Chair 

10/11/39 1 Kneholc Desk. 

10/11/39 1—9 X 12 Quaker Armstrong Rug 

10/11/39 1 — 3 X 6 Quaker Armstrong Rug 

12/15/39 1 Desk Set... 



69.00 
9.75 
6.00 

12.50 
5.95 
1.50 
3.75 



Clinic (First Floor); 

8/25/39 3 Venetian Blinds (Office) 34.38 

8/25/39 2 Venetian Blinds S. S. C - 22.92 

9/20/39 20 Olive Green No. 105 Dr. Letter Files 8-S 857.60 

9/20/39 2 Walnut No. 20-3 Dr. Letter Files 8-S 151 . 12 

11/3/39 11 B 8: D Blood Pressare... .-. 179.70 

11/16/39 6 — 7 Drawer 8 X .5 Steel Cabinets, finished Green to 
match Benson Files, 2 Wood Ba.ses to fit under 

2 files - 30.00 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



49 



Clinic (FiE6T Flook) : 

11/27/39 I Double No, 24 Brown Buerger Convex Cystoscope 
with one cathcrizing and one operating telescope 

11/27 /^i) 1 Only sheath and one obturator for cystoscope 236.20 

12/1S/39 1— B & L SUt Lamp No. 71-61-20-0(1 with. 478.17 

1/4/40 1 — No. 1357 Stereo-Compimeter 150.00 

2/8/40 Desks and Tables 91.14 

Drug Stosb: 

8/ 8/H9 I — V. S. Model P 3 combination Unit for feltering and 

filling Parenteral Solutions- 1 , 700 . 00 

8/18/39 1— 100 Gal. Spec. No. 71 acid resisting Glass Rnamel 

LineiJ Tank, Electrtc Needle tested for distilled 

Water contact _ 1 72 , 00 

8/18/39 1 Size dia. Special Slow Speed Elec. Portable Mixer. _ 190.00 

9/23/39 1— No. 7381— 3 Drawer Letter File 4a. 50 

9/25/39 3 Sets 5' Dia. Wheel casters with sq. shank. 52.20 

12/6/39 1 Yeomans E-4 StainJesK Steel Turbine Pump 257.40 

12/11/39 1 Crate Bottle Filling Machine 

12/11/39 1 Crate Steel Tank Glass Enameled 

12/11/39 3 Box Steel Pts. Glass 

12/11/39 1 Box M l-'P- Motorand Glass No. E-591/2/3- 31.26 

1/11/40 2 Knickerbocker letter Tray 2.94 

Gas Therapy Depaktmk.nt: 

11/15/39 1 Dunker Collins Tilting Relating Adult Re.<!pirator 

A. C. 1 10-220 V. Single Phase cycle 00 (Iron Lung) 1 ,037. 88 
2/26/40 1 Portable Helium Outfit (Metz) with Ma.<:k and 

Portable Circle Filter 187.50 

iNBUBANtE Office: 

8/30/39 2 Venetian Blinds 25. M7 

1 / 5/40 1— No. 2470200 Elite Typewriter 94 . 50 

2/1/40 1— No. 7070 Olive Green Desk 36.00 

New Internes' Qdabters: 

6/30/39 17 doz. Glass ash trays _. 17.00 

7/12/39 201— No. 2412 Crystal Cup Casters 130.02 

8/31/39 6 — No. 1018 Mah. Finish Tel. Tables . 27.60 

8/31/39 6— No. 10 Mah. Finish Side Chairs... 12,30 

9/ 6/39 Furnishing and Installing Window Shade> 469.12 

11/11/39 4^No. 1018 Mah. Tel. Tables IK. 40 

GYMNABiuM (18th Floor): 

9/ 2/39 2 Sets Boxing Gloves 

9/ 2/39 2 Soft Ball Bats 

9/ 2/39 2 Basket BaUs 

9/ 2/39 1 Pr. Basket Ball Goals 

9/ 2/39 2 Indoor Balls 

9/ 2/39 1 Striking Bag 

9/ 2/39 1 Horizontal Bar 

9/ 2/39 1 Pr- Chest Pulley Weights 

9/ 2/39 1 Medicine Ball 4 lb. 

9/ 2/39 1 Medicine Ball 9 lb. 

9/ 2/39 I Set of Badminton 

9/2/39 1 Striking Bag Disc 103.94 

10/27/39 9 — 1000 W, High Bay Alzak Reflectors — Concentrating 

Type with Guards I(X>.55 

in/27/39 3 — IS' Guards for Commercial Ceiling Units 12 35 

1/5/40 1 VoUey Ball Stand End 

1/5/40 1 Volley Ball Center 'M.ZB 



Bf) 



CHARITY HOSPITAl^-1939.1940 



NEW EQUIPMENT 
July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1940 
NEW HOSPITAL BUILDING— Continued 
Main Kitcuem: 

8/10/39 I — No. 441 Wood frame Tilting Platrortn Truck.. 
8/24/39 Platrorm Trucks for Dietary (Freight J 



Dh. Charles B. Odom'b Orncs: 

8/26/39 1 Venetian Blind.-- - 

2 Venetian Blinds 

1— No. 2404 1,. Walnut Steel Cabinet 

2 — No. M 63 — 66x36 Walnut Desks 

2- — No. 14401^ Walnut Revolving Armchairs. 

2— No. 1440 Walnut Armchairs 

4 — No. 1439 Walnut Side Chairs. 

2— No. 1531 Walnut Telephone Tables. 

2— No. 300 Walnut Baskets 

2 Sight Light Lamps 

2 Desk Pads,— 

12 Venetian Blinds 

2 Venetian 1230-3 Panel Screens 

2 Extra Sets (6) Hinges. 

1 Glass Shade for Desk Lamp . 



8/25/3fi 
9/ 6/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
10/30/39 
11/ 2/39 
12/ 5/39 
12/21/39 
1/26/40 



PuBCHABiNO Depabtsient: 

9/30/39 I Gross Feeble Safe No. 24824 

11/ 2/39 6 Ga. 7381 V. L. Cabinets— Mahogany 

H/ 2/39 1 Ga, 7381 V. L. Cabinet with 7-E in.scrt.s~-Mahogany 
11 /2/39 1 Ga. 7185 Desk Set with 1 Drawer fitted with Lock- 
Mahogany finish 

11 /2/39 1 Ga. 7191-S open storage case fitted with 2 shelves 

11/ 2/39 1 Ga. 7216 Panel Type Gate— Mahogany ., 

11/22/39 6— No. 10 Side Chairs. . 

1/31/40 1 Model No. 90 Mimeograph No. 9254 

2/14/40 No. 1 Bronze Smokad or 

2/26/40 1 M 2000 Bronze Lamp 

2/28/40 1 M 2001 Desk Lamp 

2/29/40 2 Bronze Smokadors 

3/ 9/40 1 Double Letter Tray 

RADitTM Room: 

11/21/39 1 Ether Suction Machine No. 712 

Record Lisbary: 

7/27/39 11 Venetiait Blinds. 

11/ 4/39 1— No. E-10 Electrically operated Basket Lift 

12/21/39 50 Cases 4-RoUcrs Pr. Draw. 

12/27/39 8— No. 7714 Transfer Binders 



SECRETAKV-TaSASttHER'a OFFICE ; 

7/27/39 1 Venetian Blind 

6 Venetian Blinds.... 

1 Venetian Blind (Coupon Room) • 

1 Venetian Blind Duster - 

1 Underwood Master No. 11/5098783 Pica 

X— No. 15 T-72 Act Metal Table (Olive Green) 

7— No. 4116 R Dr. Y & E Check Size Transfer Cases .. 



8/30/39 
8/30/39 
8/30/39 
9/ 8/39 
11/28/39 
11/30/39 



59 


.50 


4 


.97 


11 


.46 


22 


.92 


74 


.50 


297 


.60 


60 


.80 


47 


.20 


70.40 


49 


.20 


11 


.70 


30 


,00 


16 


.00 


110 


.40 


23 


.50 


1 


.47 


7. 


20 


38.00 


219.00 


43. 


85 


40. 


25 


35. 


95 


25.95 


18. 


50 


96. 


63 


12. 


35 


7. 


04 


7. 


96 


24.70 


6.32 



63.70 



112.70 

166.00 

282,50 

S.64 



10.24 

85,86 
12,94 
1.23 
93.56 
54.98 
44.28 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



61 



Sk. Mathilde's Ofi-icb (Foi'bth Floob): 

9/22/:{9 1 Underwood Master No. 14/5090435 

9/22/39 1 Underwood Stand Typewriter 11/40232S4 

11/ 6/39 1 — No. SL-6 Sight Light Floor Lamp 

11/ 6/39 1— No. 626 Desk Lamp -- 

11/ 6/39 1— No. 6942-3d-42x34 Y & E Single Pedestal Type- 
writer Desk Black Crinkle Finish 

11/ 6/39 1 — No. Y-59d Secretary Chair 

11/ 6/3S 1— No. 6904 L. T 60x34 Y & E Typewriter Desk, 

Black Crinkle Finish 

11/ 6/36 1 — No. 6^54 — 3 Drawer 55x34 Y & E Desk, Black 

Crinkle Finish -- 

11/ 6/39 1— No. Y 1500 Arm Swivel Chair, _ 

11/ 6/39 1 — No. Y-59d Secretary Chair 

11/ 6/39 2— No. 166 Arm Chairs, Tray-- 

11/ 6/39 1 Telephone Table, Black Crinkle Finish .., .. 

11/ 6/39 1— No. 2403 Y & E Steel File 

11 /6/39 3 Steel Waste Baskets --- 

11/7/39 2— No. 16 L. Walnut Letter Trays 

SociaIj Service Department: 

8/ 8/39 1— No. 8341 Green 4-Dr. Files 

■— '"" 2— No. 8341 Green 4-Dr. Files-- 

12 Venetian Blinds.- - 

1 — No. 8341 Green Filing Cabinet 

1— No. 118-S Stool— Oak- 

5— No. 8341 V. L. Cabinets — 

15 Sets No. 5615-25 V. L. Guides 

X— No. 8341 Green Steel Letter Size Cabinet 



8/18/39 
8/25/39 
8/31/39 
9/14/39 
9/27/39 
9/28/39 
2/ 3/40 



Telei'Hone Office: 

7/ 1/39 1— No. 77646 A. 



B. Emerson Fan. 



Db. Weii-bachb»'8 Office : 

8 /25/39 1 Venetian Blind — 

11/ 9/39 3 Rugs cut and pad 

11/ 9/39 2 Rug Pads -. 

12/21/39 2— No. 1230 Screens (3) Panels. 

Db. V-OY WRiouT'a Office: 
8/11/39 6 Venetian Blinds 



8/11/39 
8/n/39 

8/11/39 
S/25/39 
8/25/39 
8/25/39 
9/ 1/39 

9/11/39 
12/19/39 



1 Venetian BUnd, 

1 Model 3-H-77 Clock 

1 Model 4-H-87 Clock-- 

2 Venetian Blinds 

2 Venetian Blinds -.. - 

3 Venetian Blinds 

1 — 93g K Installed in '39 Buick with dash coatrol and 

coil aerial 

1 Underwood Master No. 11/5093791 

2 Venetian Blinds -» 



X-Kay Department 



6/13/39 

8/ 3/39 
8/ 8/39 
8/ 8/39 
8/ 8/39 



2—16' Emerson Fans 

12 Venetian Blinds 

1 L. C. Smith Typewriter 

1 Only T. W, Desk and Chair. 
1 Only Metal Waste Basket. .. 



84.56 

20.00 

2.00 

09.66 
19.84 

79.40 

80.90 
34.54 
19.84 
22.56 

37.13 

44.74 

8.10 

3.50 



43.76 
87.50 

137 

43 

2 

218.75 
25.05 
43.75 



46 
75 
25 



18.12 



11.46 
12.50 
20.60 
23.5 3 



67.27 
12.93 

3.79 

4.15 

22.92 

22.92 

34.38 

47.30 
93., 56 
23.40 



43.23 

106. (W 

90 DO 

60.00 

2.60 



CHARITY HOSPrTAl^-19.'J9-1940 



NEW EQUIPMENT 
NEW HOSPITAL BUILDING Continued 



8/15/:i9 30— No. 1658 8x5 Add. A Unit Cases 

8/17/39 4— 36' High Stools 

8/21/39 2— 36' Light Oak Slools 

8/21/39 2—8 Drawer Double Row 4x6 Cabinets 

11/13/39 5(>— "C" Metal Tab Press Guides 

11/16/39 1— O. G. File 

11/30/39 1— No. 1 0. G. Cabinet 

1 /22/40 3 Steel Stools 

1 /24 /40 2 Steel Stools 

2/12/40 1— No. 1 O. G. Cabinet.. .'."111"-^""! 

Ladies' Dbessixc Roou- 

«'',i':j^ 12" ^*^ No. Mar Bed Rests 2' Dia 

,n /An'4„ '^ ^^^^ ^o ^la"" Bed Rests 2' Dia 

IO/JO/,J» 4— .i cent Blue Type Kotex Machines 

Lecture Riiom: 

10/ 9/3» 30— No. 99 Tablet Arm Chairs_ ... 
Dkep Thekapv Dbpartmk>-t 

1 1 /28/39 1— No. 134 a' Highpoint Oak Stool. . 

Sr. t/EBAN'i» OrFICB: 

11/13/39 1—8606-5 Direct Reading Cord Recorders No. 579980 

Automatic day to day {Time Clock) _, 

Anesthesia Dki-artmenti 

1 1 /24/39 2— No 5123 Btood Pressure 
Db. WRroirr's Room: 

n/30'39 1 Chest of Drawers.. 

VisiTiKO Doctors' Room 

12/14.'39 1— No. 1100 T. Tablc-Walnut Finish 

1-^^ *',*;^''''^'"'' *^*'f'<--E (Basememt): 
,„'. 1/'^ 2 Supervisor's Desks 

12/ ;J9 KcyBoard.. 

li/Il/3fl 1 Underwood Typewriter 
5th Floor (Sb. Cr.AHisjj): 

s/14 JO 2Sets 16 Bk3 Palmetto Brushes. 

3 — No. 113 Machines 110 V.AC. 60 cycle Less tanks.. 



8/14/39 

8/23/39 

7th Floor: 

8/14/39 



8th Floor: 

11/ 2/39 

11/ 2/39 

9th Floor ; 

8/30/39 

8/30/39 

12/ 1/39 

12/ 2/39 

12/14/39 

2/13/40 

2/13/40 



65 ft. Hairfelt 
2 tbs. Jute Twine 
10 yds. Drilling 
1 lb. Cold Water 

1 -No. 94 Agate Tray 4x6. 
I Set 4 C 25 Guides 



1 — 7 Drawer Desk (Walnut r 
1 Occasional Table 
rtilitv Tables. . 
Utility Tables for Ware!-, 
Bed Side Screens. . . 

45 Brown Cribs. 

1— No. 271 \4 Adjustable Punch. 



73.80 

11.00 

5 . 50 

205.70 

22.00 

52.55 

68.70 

32.10 

5.50 

68.70 

67.17 
07.17 
49.50 

135.00 

9.52 



327 . 10 
52.27 

47.50 
22.15 

35.56 
9.91 
7.50 

6.68 
433.62 



14.72 

1.10 

.35 

12.50 

4.50 

343 . 65 

1,014.66 

7.69 

396.90 

13.72 



TREASURER'S REPORT 



63 



10th Floor: 

2/20/40 1 New Motor 1 lOV GO Cycles 30.20 

12tm Floor; 

9/ 5/39 30 Pes. 36x72 Medicine Cabinets 

9/ S/39 4 Pes. 24x72 Examination Tables 

9/ 5/39 8 Pes. 24.\72 Examination Tables 

9/ 5/39 24 Pes, 24x72 Examination Tables 

9/ 5/39 2—4x10 Cabinets 

9/ 5/39 30 — 36x72 Medicine Cabinets 

9/ 5/39 2—1x12 Cabinets 

9 /5 39 24 — 24x72 E.tamination Tables 

9/ 5/39 2 — 4x6 Doctors' Gymnasium 

9/5/39 12 — 24x73 Examination Tables 224 

9/14/39 4 Pes. Ma^sonite Tempered B. D. 3/16-4x12 

192 sq. ft. for table tops _ 16 

9/18/39 1 Davenport couch 29 

9/18/39 1 Vanity Dresser 9 

9/18/39 2Arn3chairs.. _.- 13 

9/18/39 1 Over Stuffed Chair _ 14 

9/19/39 6 Pes. Masonite Tempered B. D. 3/16-4xl2 

288 sq. ft. for table tops . 25 

11 /IS '39 Furnish and install complete with screws, brackets, 
finish all seats in Miles and Delgado Operating 

Rooms 2 , 950 

11/29/39 Utilitv Tables - 84 

12/4/39 Uliiity Tables 10 

12/19/^^9 1 Supervisor's Desk 18 

12/4/39 I' tility Tables 70 

1/ 6/40 Utihty Tables - 84 

1/17/40 Suction Machine (Reconditioned) 7 

1/31/40 Surgical Tables 38 

2/7/40 Underwood Master No. 11/5114636 _ 93 

2/13/40 Surgical Tables-. - 28 

2/19/40 Maguson Bone Surgery Engine — 1 Set Maguson Bone 

Surgery Accessories ...._ 220 

2/22/40 Telephone tables-. .. .- 13 

2/22/40 4 — No. 10 Smofcadors — Brnnxe ^ . 24 

2/28/40 1—M. C. Blood Pressure Apparattis 10. 

2/29/40 8^ N o. 1 Smok ado rs~ Bronze 49. 

3/5/40 Econotny Style No. 3 "Pull" Hi Reach Telescope 321. 

Total S32.451, 

•SpfRfTAHV-THE.'iSCBEH'S OFFICE SPECIAL FUND; 

7/ 7/39 1— No. 23.H0 D. D. Y & E Cupboard with 2 Shelves 

7/ 7/39 10- — 2- Drawers for cancelled checks 

7/7/39 2 Bases for above - -.. 140. 

7/15/39 1 — No. 52 Diebold Safe, with two plain sted shelves., J13. 

7/20/39 1 PieM of Black Corrugated Rubber Matting — 38 ft. 

long 

7/26/39 1 Piece of Black Corrugated Rubber Matting— 12 ft. 

' long- 22. 

T/Sl/39 8— No. 10 Chairs— Walnut Finish 16, 

«/ 14/39 1— No. 7921 Dusk 45x34 

a/14/39 1— No. I Ifil Chair _ 82, 

8/14/39 1^3- Drawer Ledger File with Lock 47 

10/23/39 1 — No. 1161 Imitation Revolvinu Chair 19 

Total -.| 441.74 

Gband Total.- - $32,893.48 



85 

94 
50 
50 
00 
50 

40 



oo 

60 
50 

87 
32 
09 
35 
17 
56 
24 

50 
05 
70 
34 
40 
76 



74 



30 
40 



54 
HO 

10 
00 

60 



54 CHARITY HOSPITAI^1939-1940 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 

July 10, 1940 



To the Board of Administrators and 
Doctor Roy W. Wright. Director 
Charity Hospital, 
New Orleans, La. 

Gentlemen; 



nu ^.^^'^^^y submit the annual report of the Department of Pathology of 
t-aanty Hospital at New Orleans, for the year closing June 30th, 1940. 

I wish to take this opportunity to express my appreciation for the 
cooperation which I Jiavc received from the Administrative Authorities of 
tfie Hospital and for the opportunity which they have afforded me to effect 
the reorganjaation of the Department. 

f J further wish to express my appreciation to the Visiting Pathologists 
ol lulane Univeretty School of Medicine and Louisiana State University 
School of Medicine. 

r/f**™ ^'^P'y grateful to my own professional, secretarial and technical 
stall tor their loyalty and assistance during the past year. 

Very sincerely, 
EMMA S. MOSS, M. D. 

Acting Director 

ESMimc 

end. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 65 

ORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 

PATHOLOGY AT CHARITY HOSPITAL 

IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA 

1. ADMINISTRATIVE AND MEDICAL STAFF 

Patholojrist and Acting Direc- 
tor of the Department of 
Pathology - Emma S. Moss, M. D. 

Bacteriologist — - -George F. Fasting, M. D. 

Senior Patholo^st Emil Palik. M. D. 

Senior Pathologist Maurice M. Rice, M. D. 

Assistant Resident Pathologist-GRETCHEN Vitter, M, D. 

Assistant Resident Pathologist.... Elizabeth Powell, M. D. 

Interne in Pathology John E. Maceudek, M. D. 

Interne in Pathology „HebbfJ!T L. Moore, M. D. 

Interne in Pathology Hakry L, Nutik, M. D. 

2. DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORIES 

A. Bacteriology 

Senior Technician - - MiSS Anne Pitts, B. A. 

Junior Technician Mrss Emaue McNair, B. A., M. T. 

Preparation Room and E. M. R. Service 
Junior Technician Miss Elizabeth Maupin, B, A., M. T. 

B. Serology 

Senior Technician MiSS Gesina dbHoll, B. S., M. A. 

Senior Technician — • — Mrs, Gladys Scherer, W. T. 

Blood Typing and Matching Service 
Junior Technician Miss Enix Boudreaux 

C. Biochemistry 

Senior Technician ........Mias BETDf Johnson, Phg., M. T. 

Junior Technician ™MlSS MARTHA WAY 

D Hematology and Parasitology 
Senior Technician Miss Esther McElwee, B. S., M. T. 

E. Hiatopathology 

(a) Surgical Pathology 

Senior Technician Miss REGiNA NOEL, M. T. 

(b) Pathologic Anatomy 

Scmor Technician Miss Dolores O'TooiE. M. T. 

Junior Technician -Mrs. Peabl Atcheson 

p. Emergency Laboratory 

Junior Technician Mrs Miij)RED Cobson, M. T. 

(4:00 P. M. to 12:00 Midnight) 

G Out-Patient Clinic Laboratory 

Senior Technician MiSS OUJA BiJVNKE M. T. 

Junior Technician — Misa Wilhelmina Schwartz, 

6, S.f 1*1. 3. 



56 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF TESTS PERFORMED BY THE DEPART- 
MENT OF PATHOLOGY AND DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORIES 

For the Period July 1, 1939-June 30, 1940 

Bacteriology Division , 49.423 

Serology Division _ 155,587 

Biochemistry Division . , 45 4g7 

Hematology Division 3,842 

Parasitology Division 8,431 

Histopathology Division 50.102 

Friedman Tests ^^ jqij 

Emergency Laboratory,. ,5 218 

Pasteur Department— Aati Rabies Vaccinations 4, ms 

Cliosc Laboratory . . _ _,_ 73 214 

Venereal Diagnostic Laboratory 3,117 

Basal Metabolism Laboratory _ 3,523 

Autopsies __. 1 ,511 

Protocols Written __ 1 ,511 

Actual number of tests show a 55.5 per cent increase over the last available 
figures from Charity Hospital reports for 1936-1937. 



Bodies Available for Autopsy 2,335 

Autopsies performed.. __ 1,511-04.7' 

Bodie.s turned over to Anatomy (L. S. U., Tulane and Loyola)... 143 

Coroner's Cases ..__ 847 

Coroner's Cases Autopsied by the Hospital 1 70 




Internes' Bed Room — Main Building. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 57 



AN ANALYSIS OF THE SERVICES OFFERED BY THE 

DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY TO THE PATIENTS 

OF THE HOSPITAL AND TO THE 

MEDICAL STAFF 



1. BACTERIOLOGY 



The Division of Bacteriology has been completely reorganwed and 
staffed hy technical assistants especially trained in standard and special 
Bacteriological procedures. Blood cultures which were formerly collected 
bv an Interne from the Dtpartment of Pathology are now collected by the 
Clinical Interne, in bottles containing sterile citrate furnished by the Depart- 
ment of Pathology. This has reacted to the benefit of patient. Clinic^ 
Staff and the Division of Bacteriology by preventing delays m collection and 
allowine the Division to handle a larger volume of work. The work incident 
^ the pneumonia program has been satisfactorily carried out and plans for 
^ore adequate and rapid diagnosis are being placed in effect in anticipa- 
tion of the iie.tt pneumonia season. 

2, SEROLOGY 

prior to my incumbency an unstandardiied and rccogniied type of 
Wassermann reaction was in use in this department. This division has 
undergone a complete reorganization and standardisation. 

The Kline test, which is a precipitation test Jor syphilis and nationally 
^fpnted has been instituted as a screen test to detect positive and doubl- 
f,! cases' of syphilis. It is a less expensive lest than the Wassermann as U 
requires no animals, fewer reagents and less expensive apparatus. 

The Kolmer modification of the Wassermaan test is used as a confirm- 
atory test on aU Kline positive cases. 

The use of two standard tests for the detection of syphilis is the 
accepted and the approved procedure in all accredited laboratones. 

Prior to my incumbency no serological test for syphilis was performed 

„ nrosnective donors for transfusion. At the present time aliout <o/e of 

°n donors are tested on request and the number of positives is approx- 

^nlately 10%. This is comparable to the number of positives in the general 

hospital and clinic admissions. 

Arraneements have been made to carry out preliminary k hue te.sts on 

11 nadeuts to be operated on in the RNT department. 1 his service has 

fin requested by the operators who feel that operations should not l>e done 

cvnhilitic patients without some special preparation. Ihis work will of 
""r^ssity have to be done at night, inasmuch as patients are adraittccl on 
fhe evening before operation the following mormng. 

Previously Colloidal Gold Tests were not performed. This test is 
cessary in 'the study of Centra! Nervous System Syphilis. They are now 
routine on request. _ 

The Department of Serology manufactures the Mine antigen. This 

t-Ln is sold by biological houses at $2.a{) per eu. cm. We use about 500 

^' per year, which is produced at a cost of approximately Sin,Otl for the lot, 

^^ The Department of Serology manufactures the tKolmcrl Wassermann 

antigen. This is done at a like saving. 

The Department of Serology manufactures the hemolysin at a cost of 
proximately S5.00 per year. The value of this product is about SM.Ort. 
^^ Yjjg Department of Serology prepares the complement for the above test. 



68 CHARITY HOSPITA1^1939-1940 



The Department of Serology ^la^ura*^tu^es the Colloidal Gold Solution 
for the diagnosis of central nervous system syphilis. 

NOTE: The purchase of these biologicaJs from the manufacturing 
chemists and biological bouses would make the cost of these tests almost 
prohibitive. The manufacture by the hospital Department of Patholoev 
reduces the cost to a minimal figure. 

3. BIOCHEMISTRY 

Prior to my incumbency, a total of only 13 types of biochemical deter- 
minations were performed in this diagnostic division. The service in this 
laboratory has been completely reorganize.! and 43 (NOTE: see appended 
protocol) different types of determinations are now carried out on routine 
requests. 1 he diagnosis and treatment of patients has been greaUy facili- 
tated by the accurate and specific biochemical determinations offered in 
this division, 

n, '"i-*j* ^^^\ "'* attempt to diagnose or identify poisons in blood or 
other body fluids and tissues has been carried out in this hospital. An 
icoio '^ *^ "^'^^ *^° establish a small, but efficient, service in tox- 

All solutions, reagents and standards for use in the Division of Bio- 
cnemistry are prepared in this division. This, as in other departments 
euecis a considerable saving, inasmuch as these reagents may be prepared 
less expensively than if they are bought ready made ^ 

i. HEMATOLOGY AND PARASITOLOGY 

»„r„'^"°'' ',? ™^. '"'^"■nbEncy, there was not a specialized division of Hetna- 
t^.^¥ °''.Pa''as't'>"oKy in the Charity Hospital. All such work was in the 
fm- tt,° '"experienced internes. A consultation service has been inaugurated 
■or inese two specialties and a diagnostic laboratory established. The 
nrn^^cfj •j,'''"^?*'** ^^ parasitic infections, including malaria, has 
pfogressea rapidly. This service has become one of the most active in the 
Qeparrment and operates markedly to the benefit of the patient, much 
valuable time being saved in diagnosis and treatment. 

6. HISTOPATHOLOGY 

The techm'que for handling surgical pathology specimens has been 
reorganized to such an extent that diagnoses by the pathologist on the 
resident and visiting staffs have been facilitated. The volume of work in this 
■ ^lk°"j increased enormously and we believe that the reorganizaUon 
in tftis department has reacted for the improvement of diagnoses and the 
subsequent care of the patient. An attempt has been made to return reports 
more rapidly so that in many cases hospital days are lessened for individual 
patients, 

6, FROZEN SECTION SERVICE FOR RAPID DIAGNOSIS 

Prior to my incumbency, the number of frozen sections for rapid diag- 
nosis averaged about I a week. Since my incumbency, a satisfactory tech- 
nique has been instituted and pathologists are available at all times and 
at all hours for rapid diagnosis while the patient is yet on the operating 
table. This frequently saves the patient a second operation and assures 
the proper surgical handling, depending on the diagnosis. In the past six 
months this service has increased remarkably, the number of requests 
averaging almost 1 a day. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 59 



7. FRIEDMAN TESTS 
Prior to the past six months this very important diagnostic procedure 
was not available in Charity Hospital, and if the test was carried out on 
these patients by other agencies, the patient was charged $1.00 for the 
examination. The need for this service has been demonstrated in the number 
of legitimate requests that we have had at the present time. This service 
is purely a consultation service. 

8. EMERGENCY LABORATORY 

Under the present organization the Department of Pathology and 
DiHKBostic Laboratories functions 24 hours a day, 7 days in the week. The 
FmerKency Laboratory has been established in the basement m the Mor- 
tuary Unit This laboratory cares for all work arising between 5 P. M, and 
AM and from Saturday noon until Monday morning. A technician has 
Kpen assigned to this sen'ice so that all necessary diagnostic procedures may 
hp carried out rapidly. This operates for the benefit of the patient in rapid 
diagnosis and treatment as well as to the benefit of the Medical Staff. 

9. PASTEUR INSTITUTE 

The Pasteur Institute prepares all atili-rahies vaccine administered in the 
Pasteur Clinic of the Charity Hospital The cost of materials used in the 
nreoaration of this very valuable biological product amounts to approx- 
■ ^telv 8200 00 a year. The estimated value of the finished product aniomils 
l*" approximately $7,000.00. This represents a theoretical saving to the 
hospital of some $6,800.00. 

All anti-rabies treatments are administered by the Medical Staff of 
the Department of Pathology. 

pathologists from this department examine all dog and other animal 

ains submitted for the detection of rabies. Considerable study has gone 

■fa the improvement of the staining method of suspected brains for the 

JTtection of rabies and the diagnosis can now be made with greater surety 

3S wcU as rapidity. 

The department sends out telegrams and letters of reports on all brains 

The department sends out follow-up letters on alt patients failing to 
return for treatment. 

10. TUMOR CLINIC 

One or more pathologists from the resident staff is always in attendance 
consultation in this clinic for the study of tumors. 

Biopsy specimens are prepared in the Division of Histopathology for 
diagnosis by a pathologist. 

U. CLINIC LABORATORY 

This diagnostic division of the Department of PathoIoRy serves the out- 
.j" t clinic department. The volume of work in this lal>oratory is enor- 
P*"^ (J must be done rapidly, inasmuch as reports mu-st be relumed to 
"^""rharts in as short a space of time as is possible with accuracy. The 
t°^ ratory personnel must not only perform the number of technical opera- 
labor j^^^^j jjj jjjg numerical analysis, but in addition must actually collect 
^''"soecimens directly from the patient in most ca.ses. This necessitates the 
* rilinc of a large number of individuals. A member of the medical staff 
h^" atteodance in this clinic at all times for consultation, as well as the 
iarO'ii'g °"' "' diagnostic procedures. 



CHARITY HOSPITA1^1939-1940 



12. VENEREAL DIAGNOSTIC CLINIC 
The medical staff, with the assistance of one member of the technical 
staff, operates this fUnic daily. The average number of patients cared for in 
this service amounts to 20.2') a day. These patients are referred by the 
medicaJ staff from all other clinics and from the hospital. Since the recent 
campaign by the V. S. Public Heallb tor the diagnosis and eradication of 
venereal diseases, the work of this clinic has increased remarkably. Such 
procedures as the Frci test for lyraphogranulnmu iiiEuinale, Ducrey test 
tor chancroid, Dark Field Examination for primary syphilis and tests for 
granuloma inguinale are carried out on request. In addition to the above 
venereal work, diagnostic procedures are carried out for the detection of 
leprosy and fungus infections, in this division. 

13. PREPARATION ROOM 

In any diagnostic laboratory a division roust be set aside which prepares 
material for all other divisions. This is (he purpose of this service. 

All culture media used by the hospital for the proper identification of 
imectious agents is manufactured in this division. This again is carried out 
,,„,! ■"'"'"f expenditure, inasmuch as the material can be prepared frtim 
li»f»i wr less expense than the purchase of the same material com- 

pletely prepared by biological houses. 

Diagnostic antigens and anti-sera for serological agglutination tests for 
the diagnosis of disease are prepared. 

Antigens for allergy tests arc prepared. 

AU staining solutions used in the department are prepared. 

All solutions other than tho.se used in biochemistry are prepared, 
well's, i^'^f^'''^" f""" the collection of specimens throughout the hospital, as 
weu as in the department, is washed, wrapped and sterilized in this division 
in this di'" ? ^**"'^'* ^""^ apparatus for use in the department is fabricated 

1*. BASAL METABOLISM LABORATORY 

mn 1 ^'"'^'' °f consultations sent to this division has increased enor- 
mously. J revision has been made .so that the division operates 6 days a 
wecK, instead of the previous 5 days a week, and both colored and white 
male and female can be cared for on every day. This has been done by 
tne assignment of a special technician to this service. 

U. MORGUE 

This service must of necessity operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week 
Iwo additional attendants have been added to this division in order to take 
care of the enormous increase in work on this service and to assure that 
no delays occur in the removal of bodies from the ward and the disposition 
of the bodies received, 

J^* ^"° Medical ."schools use the Morgue Amphitheatre for an average 
of 40 teaching hours per month. This necessitates frequent cleaning and 
preparation of the amphitheatre as well as the handling of autopsicd 
material. 

All necessary cleaning in this division is performed by the Morgue 
Attendants. 

The records of this department and the necessary vital statistics reports 
are prepared by the clerk in this divi.^ion. 

The Morgue attendants convey bodies from the ward to the Morgue 
on caU. 



DEPARTMENT OP PATHOLOGY 61 



They prepare and release bodies to the Coroner and to the undertakers. 

They notify memhers ot the medical staff when bodies are to be released 
and when autopsies are to be performed. 

They notify the Coroner of all cases falling under his jurisdiction. 

They prepare for burial all bodies buried by the hospital. 

They attend to the disposition of all unclaimed bodies to the depart- 
ments of anatomy of the two medical schools and of the Loyola University 
Dental School. 

They care for all instruments and materials used in the performance of 
autopsies, including the sharpening of cutting instruments. 

They check and send out all iinen used in this department. 

16. ANIMAL HOUSE 

The maintenance of suitable animal colonies is an important funclion in 
any diagnostic division. Animals are available for diagnostic inoculation on 
request at the present time. It is no longer necessary to purchase guinea 
pigs, inasmuch as with better housing facilities and care wc are able to 
breed our own supply. Thk is partially true for the rabbits used in the 
Friedman test and in the manufacture of anti-rabies virus. However, it is 
expected that within the next 2-3 months that the rabbit colony will al.so be 
ggjf. maintaining. It was necessary to purchase a number of white mice in 
order to start a mouse colony. This colony will likewise maintain itself ;iiid 
in anticipation of the next pneumonia season a sufficient number of animals 
Yrill l>e available for the confirmation and diagnosis of all types of pneumo- 
coeci. 

17. BLOOD DONOR ROLL 

The Department of Pathology has cooperated with the Blood Donor 
Roll of the City of New Orleans, sending out a member of the medical 
staff 3"^ ^ technician to obtain blood for typing and serological testing for 
pjiiljs. All of this typing, as well as the serological tests for syphilis, is 
oerfortned in the Depanment of Pathology. Donors from this roll are 
used for the transfusion of patients for whom donors would otherwise be 
unavaHable. In the past year some 400 itidividuals have been tested for 
the blood donor roll. 

18. RECEIVING FILE DESK 

This service has been instituted within the past 7 months. All specimens 
are received and delivered to the proper diagnostic laboratory, preventing 
the loss of specimens, as frequently occurred in the past, as well as saving 
of time in the examination of these specimens. The clerk tiles dui>licatc 
reoorts ot procedures performed by the Division of Diagnostic Laboratories. 

The clerk likewise answers all telephone inquiries about rci)orts on 
sneciinens. This has operated to save a great many hours of technical time, 
inasmuch as prior to the institution of this service inquiries were of 
ces.sity an.swered l>y the technical assistants in each laboratory. 

The clerk notifies the wards when Idood matching reports are ready 
for delivery, therelty saving valuable time in the treatment of patients, as 
well as releasing those individuals who have offered themselves as donors. 

The clerk checks all improperly filled out laboratory requests by con- 
tacting the iiiforination desk, the Record Library, the ward or the doctor 
in charge of the patient. 

This service issues all test tubes, bottles and supplies provided by this 
H oartment to the various central services of the hospital. 



62 CHARITY HOSPITAI.^193g-1940 

19, RECORDING CLERKS 

Prior to the institution of this service of recording all laboratory reports 
directly on the patient's chart by members of the staff of the Department 
of Pathology, aa average of 110 reports per day were turner] into the Record 
Library which had never been entered on the patient's chart. In addition 
to these, numerous other records of diagnostic procedure were not only 
not entered on the chart, but the records were lost on the ward. This meant 
that the patient's chart was incomplete and frequently valuable diagnostic 
data on the patient was lost to the doctor. This also necessitated the repe- 
tition of many diagnostic procedures, either during the patient's stay in the 
hospital or on readmissioa, or in the clinic. At the estimated cost of some 
13c per laboratory test, based on the numerical analysis, this represents a 
monetary loss of $13.00 per day or $1,680.00 per year. 

This sen,'ice has operated to immcasuraljly improve the patient's record 
and diagnosis. 

The procedure has also eliminated private work being sent to the 
Department of Pathology with fictitious names and hospital nambers. This 
was no mconsiderable item. 

't- ^''^^''''f ^^ '^^'^" effected in stationery and printing by the institution 
of this service, by reducing by one-half the number of laboratory requisi- 
*"*" t A ^^^^' '°'*^™«'^h as in the past the original requisition was kept 
ir.*^-' J "Apartment files and a duphcate was typed for the patient's record. 
This duplicate was destroyed after the interne had entered the report on 
the chart. 

A further saving has been effected along this line by the elimination of 
311 shps, except one single type of request slip. 

It has also eliminated the use of two typists for the making of these 
duphcate typed reports. 

20, SECRETARIAL STAFF 

The secretary to the department prepares all requisitions for the depart- 
ment and keeps records of the delivery of supplies. This secretary also 
directs the activities of the other members of the secretarial staff. She 
must also act as personnel officer tor the department. This service is of 
extreme importance in a department as large as the Department of Path- 
ology and employing the number of individuals that are employed in this 
department. It is frequently necessary for her to assign individuals to cover 
services where the regular member is absent. She must act as a liasion offi- 
cer between the medical staff and the department in the matter of records 
and appointments for staff members of the Department of Pathology, 
Besides these very special duties it is necessary for her to carry a consider- 
able vnhime of the routine protocol record work as well. 

The secretarial staff as a whole carries an enormous volume of routine 
work in the prepardtion of autopsy protocols. During the year 1939-40, 151 1 
autopsies were performed in the Department of Pathology. Each protocol 
requires an average of 8 legal cap typewritten pages in its final preparation. 

Before the final copy can be made the material must be dictated by 
the Pathologist performing the autopsy. It is easy to see that this consti- 
tutes an unusual load of .secretarial work. 

All protocols of autopsies are indexed and checked with the autopsy 
peraiit for diagnosis and copies are attached to the patient's chart to be sent 
to the Record Library for file, another copy is retained by the Department 
of Pathology to be bound in monthly or bimonthly volumes and a copy is 
retained by the doctor who performed the autopsy. On all cases coming 
under the coroner's jurisdiction a copy is likewise sent to the coroner's 
office. 



DEPARTMENT OF PATHOLOGY 63 



The bound volumes o( protocols are available for study and use by all 
members of the visiting and resideat staff. A suitable place has been mude 
available in the department so that the medical staff may come in at any 
hour of the day or night and use these records. They may not be removed 
from the department under any circumstances. 

This service also prepares a cross-index of anatomic diagnoses in accord- 
ance with the standard nomenclature of diseases. 

All records on surgical specimens received in the Division of Histopath- 
nlotry are prepared by the secretary in this division. Over 10,000 surgical 
soecimens a year are received and gross descriptions are dictated to the 
secretary by the pathologist. The final records are indexed and the volumes 
are bound monthly. These records are available to the residents and vis- 
iting staff for study, withia the department. 

The records of the Pasteur Clinic are Itept by the secretary in this divis- 
ion and letters and telegrams are sent out, 

21. SERVICE TO THE RESIDENT AND INTERNE STAFF 

A clinical pathological conference has been organized and is held each 
Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 P. M. in the Morgue Amphitheatre. These 
inferences are participated in by the three hospital units, the lulane 
TTnit of Visiting Pathologists, the L. S. V. Unit of Visit iug Pathologists 
fliid the Charity Hospital Staff Pathologists. On occasion, pathologists from 
pT^ewhere have been invited to conduct these conferences. The altettdance 
t these conferences has increased steadily and now averages about 75 mem- 
hprs of the visiting and resident staff weekly. A projection screen has been 
Provided in the Morgue and through the courtesy of the L. S. U. Depart- 
pnt of Pathology the use of a microprojector has been provided so that 
St histopathology of each case may be demonstrated as well as the gross 
^tlioloev The clinicians have been encouraged to participate in these 
** nfereiTces as weU as the pathologists. The X-ray Department, the 
TJftdiology Department and the Heart Station cooperate by making available 
Jtieir records for these conferences and by attending in person. 

Clinical Pathological Conferences are held 4 evenings each week at 
A p M in the Morgue Amphitheatre, at which time the material obtained 
( m autopsies in the pa.it 24 hours is considered. These conferences are 

ducted by the Charity Hospital Staff Pathologists and are attended 
bv° aa average of 25 visitiag and resident clinical staff members. 

Since my incumbency, the slides and records of the Division of Hi.sto- 
thology have been made available, with necessary microscopes for those 
^ dents desiring to qualify themselves in pathology for the examinations 
o^^their respective certification boards. 

Provision has been made for a room and for bodies for cadaveric 

frv in the Morgue. This is particularly for the benefit of the resident 
surge y ^^^^^ .^ ^^^ preparation for National Board Examinations for the 
^American CoUege of Surgeons. 

22. SUBSCRIPTIONS TO PUBLICATIONS 

Prior to 1940, the department subscribed to 15 medical publications. 
r^v.- has been reduced to 9 publications. Those ehminated were the more 

nsive foreign journals. AU of the journals now subscribed for are spc- 
^^^vcd oathology and clinical laboratory journals and ore necessary in 
*^Ar that the department may keep abreast of the newest and best in 
Sboratory diagnostic procedures. 



64 CHARITY HOSPlTAI^-1939-1940 



23. MORALE OF PERSONNEL 

I'nder ihe increased volume of work, quality has increased out of pro- 
porlion to the volume. With this increase, hours of overtime work liy all 
taembi-rs of the depanmcnt is frequenlly necessary. This is carried out 
cheerfully and in spile of it, the monile of all the members of the depart- 
ment is excellent. 

The Department of Pathology is now operaUng in perfect harmony 
with the Departments of Pathology of the two medical schools and there 
IS a friendly and cooperative attitude on the part of all members of the 
visiting staff pathologists as well as the resident pathologists. 

No efforts have heen spared to assure the 3 units operating within the 
department of lair dealing and full cooperation in their teaching programs. 

■ t^f?!?"^' ^}^ "**'^'* ^°'" Pi^v^t* and commercial lahoratories, not connected 
with Lhanty Hospital, has been eliminated since my incumbency. This was 
done with the full sanction of the Director of the hospital. This item in the 
past has amounted to a consideral>le figure. 

There is much yet to be done to bring the Department of Pathology to 
Its maximum efficiency. The past months have seen many changes to im- 
prove the services offered by this department. However, the reorganization 
m tne Uepartment of Pathology ha.s been greatly handicapped by an insuf- 
iicicni number of adequately trained technicians and secretarial as.sistants 
li fh- A^ ""^ experience of other hospitals the number of personnel 
m tnis department is from one-fourth to one-third that which is necessary 
for the volume of work performed. 



eir 



y^e Acting Director and the resident Staff Pathologists devote th 
avail M*^ '° 'm* Department of Pathology of Charity Hospital. They are 
and V' -f^*^ o fV™*"^ ''"' '■""^"^t^'W" "'tl' the members of the Resident 



Respectfully submitted, 
EMMA S. MOSS. M. D, 
Acting Director 




Student Nuries' Library — Nurses' Home. 



REPORT OF X-RAY DEPARTMENT fiS 

REPORT OF X-RAY DEPARTMENT 

Vear Closing Jyne 30th, 1940 

AilEDEE GaANGEB, M. D., DlRBCTOIl 

(Died December IStli, 1939J 

James B. Ihwin, M. D., Acting DiaECTon 

(Resigned June 30th, 1940) 

Dh. Eona W. Brown, Acting Birkctor and Radiologist 

Dk. Ma.vuel Garcia, Acting Director and Thbrapevtist 

Dr. Henky J. Jexsem, Second Year Resident in Radiology 

Dr. Dorothy Mattinglt, Second Yeajr Resident in Radiology 

D«. James Rii.ey, First Year Resident in Radiology 

Dr. Harry Fishbeiji, First Year Resident in Radiology 

DIAGNOSTIC DIVISION 

Total number of patients examined 6G,736 

Total number of plates used__ 112,936 

Total number of fluoroscopies 4,447 

HOSPITAL CASES 

White - 20,898 

Colored- -. 13.480 

ACCIDENT ROOM AND CLINICAL CASES 

White -- __ 16,Sie 

Colored - - 11,973 

Size of Films Used as Follows: 

5x7 1.290 

8x10 - - ., 29,190 

10x12 - 21,683 

11x14-... - 17,235 

14x17 - 43,238 

Parts Exami-ved as Follows: 

Cranium and bones ot the face 3,891 

Sinuses -_ 1,560 

Mastoids _ _ _ 892 

Upper extremities ,. 6,745 

Lower extremities 7,082 

Chests 31,776 

Gastrointestinal tract 3.614 

Genito-urinary tract ! 5,840 

Spinal column - 2,371 

Abdomen and pelvis 4,113 

THERAPY DIVISION 

Saperficial Therapy cases ._ 3,063 

peep Therapy cases _ 14,772 

Total - 17,83.5 

Superficial Therapy treatments.. 4,824 

peep Therapy treatments 22,883 

Total 27,507 

guperficial Therapy new cases 627 

peep Therapy new cases. 739 

Total 1 ,306 

* RADIUM DIVISION 

Wh»t<^ - - - 135 

Colored..- --- 123 

Total .- 2,';8 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edxa W. Brown, M. D., 

Acting Director, Dept. of Radiology 



66 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



REPORT OF HEART STATION— 
ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC LABORATORY 



Director 

RicHARn Ashman, Ph. D. 

Assistant Director 
Jambs L. Gouaux, M. D. 

Laboratory Technicians 

Dorothy Joseph, B, S, 

ViEGiKiA Meeiwether. B. S, 

Esther Jodun, B. S. 

Joseph Bueciie 

SlON'EY Pailet 

Secretary 
Marcelle Jakreau 



_ July 5, 1940 

Dr. Roy Wright, Director and the 

Board of Administrators of the Charity Hospital 
><£«' Orleans, La. 

Dear Sirs: 

r . j^^ 1939-1940 has seen a considerable increase in the numlier of 

electrocardiograms taken by the Heart Station, together with an augmenta- 
tion in the interest in this aid to diagnosis on the part of the hospital staff, 
tfecause the technical assistance is now more nearly adequate to our need, 
lead IV of the electrocardiogram has for the first time been introduced as a 
part of our routine procedure. Furthermore, with the help of a full time 
resuJent assigned to the Heart Station, it has become possible stiU further 
to uicrease the usefulness of the department by fluoroscopic examination of 
many patients. 

During the period, January to June, 1939, the number of electrocardio- 
grams taken per working day was nearly 18; during the same period in IQ-IO. 
tne number has risen to over 35. This increase has resulted not only from 
the taking of more records from patients with cardiac disease, but also from 
the recording of pictures on surgical cases as a part of the routine pre- 
operative check-up. 

During the past several years, the department has not only served its 
purpose to the State as a part of the diagnostic procedure, but has also 
contributed to the general knowledge of the subject through the medium 
of studies made and published by the Director, and by others,— and from 
the publication of a book. "Essentials of Electrocardiography" (Macroillanl 
which has been translated into the Spanish language (Buenos .^ires) and 
which is soon to appear in a second American Edition. This has, of course, 
been accomplished without neglect of the routine duties of the department. 
We wish to thank the Director of the Hospital and the Board of 
Administrators for the splendid cooperation in taeililating the work of the 
department. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard A.'ihmaii. 

Director. 
RA/J 



ELECTROCARDIO GRAPHIC DEFARTMENT 67 

HEART STATION 
AHNUAL REPORT 

1939 1940 

July-December January-June 

Ward Patients 2,332 3,501 

Clinic Patients \ AH 1,646 

Heaet Station .— 77 119 

Totals ..-...--.- ...— .. 3,5S;{ 5.266 

GRAND TOTAL - ---- S.8« 

January 1, 1940 to July 1, 1940 

Fluoroscopic examinations reported - - 213 



68 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 

THERAPY CHARITY HOSPITAL OF LOUISIANA 

AT NEW ORLEANS 

June 30, 1939 to July 1, 1940. 

To the Director and Board of Administrators. 

Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans, 

Gentlemen: 

... ^. 8™ submitting herewith ihe annual report of the Department of 
Physical Therapy for the year ending June 30, 1940: 

PERSONNEL: 

The personnel of the Department as of this date consists of Ihe fol- 
lowing: 

Marion B. Stewart, B. S„ R. p. T. T., Supervisor 

MARY Bachahach, B. P. Ed., R. P. T. T., Graduate Technician 

Roth Langley, b. S., R. p. T. T. " 

Mr. T. D. p. Aldrich, B. Ho R P T T " 

Sara Lewis, B. S., R, N, " 

Florence Foegele, P. T.' T. " 

Abda Leggett, p. T. T. " 

Beatrice B. Currie, Secretary 

Pearl Simon, R. N. 

Betty Stoogh, E, N. 

Fred Talbot, Junior Technician 

EUzABETH Adracna, Admitting Clerk 

Morris Bueche, Orderly 

Leonard Dajgle, Orderly 

It will be observed that the graduate technicians employed in the De- 
partment are aU graduates of schools of physical education or of schools of 
nuiBing or have had at least two years of college work, with science majors, 
louowed by one year of graduate training in physical therapy. 

Rwommendations: The outstanding need of the department of Physical 
Iherapy from the stajidpoint of personnel, is the appointment of a physician 
in the role of director. Such an appointment is essential for the most effec- 
tive utilization of the departmental facilities, and is also essential for the 
proper recognition of the Department by the rating boards. The establish- 
ment of a K:hool of physical therapy, as will be pointed out later, is possible 
and very desirable here, but could not be accomplished until a medical 
director had been appointed for the Department. 

Attention has been called above to the training and experience of the 
departmenta] personnel, which compare favorably with the training and 
expenence of the personnel in accredited physical therapy departments in 
other institutions of the country. The salaries at Charity Hospital, how- 
ever, are far below the standards established for accredited departments. 
While fuliy aware of the difficulties facing the Hospital administration in 
regard to finances, I venture to express the hope that these inequalities of 
salary may shortly be corrected, both that the Department may be properly 
accredited and that the excellent service of our technicians, and the j^ood 
results they have achieved, may receive the proper recognition. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 



The amount of work now being done in the Department reriuircs at 
least two more technicians for its proper performance. 

SPACE: 

The space presently occupied by the Department in the Lapeyre- 
Miltenbergcr Convalescent Home is satisfactory from the standpoint of loca- 
tion. Some seventy percent of the total number of patient.s handled come 
from the clinics, and the major number of other patients are in the stage 
of convalescence and will, presumably, be hospltaliied in this building when 
it functions as a convalescent home. 

Recommendations; For the reasons stated, I hope very much that the 
plan, tentatively discussed, of moving the entire Department of Physical 
Therapy to the new hospital will not he carried out, if for no other reason 
than that an equal amount of space could not, as I understand, be assigned 
for our work in it. 

On the other hand, our efficiency would be greatly improved if two 
rooms (about 20 by 20 feet each) were assigned to the Department in the 
new building. Such an assignment would make possible the convenient 
treatment of ambulatory and roller patients not hospitalized in the Con- 
valescent Home, and would simplify the taking of equipment to the wards 
for bedside treatment. If such space were allocated to us, one of the new 
technicians could be permanently assigned to the main building. 

EQUIPMENT: 

The amount of work done in the Department, which will be itemized 
later, places a heavy drain upon our equipment, much of which is old. some 
of which is antiquated, and most of which is in constant use. Replace- 
tnents during the year have been negligible, as has been the case for sev- 
eral years past, during which time the volume of our work lias steadily 
increased. 

Recommendations: Since good results can be achieved only when 
equipment holds up under heavy usage, and since the use of old equipment 
is not always free from risk. I make the following suggestions as to the 
replacement of old and the purchase of new equipment: 

1 — A Morse wave machine for the low frequency unit (two arc now 
in use.) 

2 — A non-portable short wave machine suitable for giving all methods 
of short wave diathermy treatments (not one of the machines now in use 
is equipped for all methods of treatment, and time and opportunities are 
both lost as a result.) 

3, — Two machines for the radiant energy unit, capable of being used 
on an eight-hour basis, (The machines now in use are too old to stand up 
under such heavy loads. If they were replaced by new machines, they 
could be transferred to the white and colored pediatric wards, respectively, 
where they would take some of the load off the machines in the Depurt- 
ment, and at the same time, could be safely employed because they would 
not be used continuously, as is now the ease. This plan would also elim- 
inate the hazard, which is by no means negligible, of bringing very small 
infants to the Department for treatment, as must now be done. Neither the 
nursing staff nor the departmental staff is sufficiently large to supply the 
children with the proper supervision under these circumstances.} 

4_-Two portable suction-pressure machines to be used for bcd-riddeu 
patients with occlusive peripheral vascular diseases. The two machines now 
III use are not modem, and in addition, are cumbersome, and cannot be used 
on the wards.) 



70 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

S — Two additional fever units, to permit prompt treatmeiit of patients 
for whom this type of therapy is advised. The machines sow in use are 
totally inadequate for the calls upon tliem, and there is a long waiting list 
of patients.) 

6 — The provision of a small gymnasium with several pieces of appara- 
tus, such as stall bars, shoulder wheel and inverted walking bars, to enhance 
good restoration of function in joint conditions. (Nothing of the sort is 
now avitilaWe, and the restorative therapy now applied necessarily stops 
short of its full possibilities.) 

7— A camera to enable us to check accurately and scientifically the 
results of treatment, and the progress of cure. It is generally agreed that 
photographic records furnish the only acceptable method of determining 
results. 

Certain of this equipment is needed more urgently than other items 
listed, and all of it is not only desirable, but really necessary, 

EDUCATIONAL ACTIVITIES: 

Each student nurse in Charity Hospital is assigned tor one month 
to the Department of Physical Therapy. The time, although inadequate for 
any but superficial training, at least permits her to become familiar with 
the pnnciples and practice of physical therapv, as she is likely to encounter 
I 'ff, P"^'^^^ '"■ institutional work. This practical training is in addition 
to the twelve lectures on the theory of physical therapy given to the 
nurses m their first year of training. 

The Supervisor of the Physical Therapy Department is a member of the 
taeulty of the Louisiana State University, where instruction in physical 
therapy is conducted on both theoretic and practical lines. The time thus 
consumed is put to excellent use, for there is an increasing realization 
among the internes and residents of the possibilities of this Department, as 
the result of the instruction which they receive in their undergraduate years. 

Recommendations: One of the objects of the Department of Physical 
therapy should be the eventual establishment of a school devoted to the 
teaching of this specialty. Very few institutions in the United States have 
wider opportunities in this regard. The establishment of such a school 
However, could not he contemplated until Charity Hospital were able to 
"^A- 1^ requirements for accrediting, including the appointment of a 
"!?'*k ""■^^*°*' 'or tfie Department, the provision of proper equipment 
and the bnnging of the salaries of the technicians into line with the stan- 
dards elsewhere. 

EXHIBIT: 

The Department presented an exhibit on "Passive Motion and Massage 
m the Treatment of Fractures of the Upper End of the Humenis" at the 
Annual Meeting of the American Physiotherapy Association in New York, 
June 23-28, 1940. It was well received and attracted considerable attention 
to the work of the Hospital. 

The Department also participated by invitation in one of the round 
table conference* at the Sectional Meeting of the American College of 
Surgeons held in New Oiieans in January. 

ANALYSIS OF DEPARTMENTAL ACTIVITIES: 

Attached you will find a summary of the year's work of the Depart- 
metit, divided according to: Type of Treatment, Work by Months, Race of 
Patient and Sources of Recommendation (hospital or clinic.) 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 71 

I am also attaching to this report a copy of a paper entitled "Physical 
Therapy as a Spedalty," which was written by invitation for the March 
15, 1940, issue of The Tiger, the official paper of the School of Medicine of 
Louisiana State University. I welcomed the opportunity of putting Ihe 
work of the Department before the students as one more method of point- 
ing out to them the possibilities of this specialty, and I think you may be 
interested in certain details of our activities whch do not properly belong 
in a purely statistical report. 

Respectfully submitted, 

MARION B. STEWART, Supervisor, 

Physical Therapy Department. 
Encs. — 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

MONTHLY TREATMENT RECORD 
July 1, 1939- June 30, 1940 



1930 


BAD. 
HEAT 


INFRA 

RED 


IJIA. 


WRJHt, 

POOL 


MASS. 


THER, 
EX. 


HUB. 
BATH 


U. V. 


LOWC) 
FREQ, 

cmB. 


SPC, 
PRES. 


ravER 

THEH. 


TOTAL 


POLIO. 
CASES 


July 

August 

September . 

October 

November.- 
December, . 

1940 
January .._ 

February 

March 

April 

May_ _ 

June 


74 
198 
277 
322 
26a 
246 

257 
267 
324 
332 

357 
230 


022 

1,198 
1,398 
1,741 
1,466 
1,702 

1,398 
1,626 
2,208 
2.369 

2,218 
1,364 


346 
337 
299 
358 
369 
415 

387 
426 
582 
671 
008 
474 


114 
172 
174 
154 
93 
87 

86 
60 
82 
S2 
92 
90 


930 
938 
1,102 
1,396 
1,271 
1,192 

1,081 

1,234 
1,590 
1 ,09S 
1,668 
1.095 


513 

6S3 
808 
1,015 
880 
816 

793 

985 

1 .248 

1,272 

1,2(W 

964 


30 

63 
80 
93 
39 
39 

19 
2.5 
23 
19 
13 



143 

181 
224 
212 
229 
300 

241 

326 
349 
303 
329 
206 


359 
278 

23S 
311 
300 
394 

398 
355 
488 
562 
496 
287 


214 
224 
225 
193 
133 
113 

77 
116 
111 

72 
105 

87 


25 

30 
50 
36 

37 
27 

33 
32 
36 
32 

34 
29 


3,670 
4,270 

4.875 
5.831 
5.086 
5,331 

4,770 
5,442 
7,041 

7,382 
7,188 
4,898 


78 
104 
102 

162 
74 
79 

66 
80 
92 
112 
98 
71 


Total 

^»\ t 1..J 


3.137 


19.608 


6,272 


1.262 


15,195 


11,215 


449 


3.103 


4,472 


1,670 


401 


05,784 


1,118 



Far ad ism- 

Sinu$oidal- 

lonization- 



a 

« 

> 

•< 

X 
o 

CO 



r 




student Nurses' Lonnge— Nunes* Home. 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 



78 



PHYSICAL THERAPY DEPARTMENT 

MONTHLY TREATMENT RECORD 
July 1, 1939- June 30, 1940 





WHITE 


COLORED 


1939 


NEW 
PATIENTS 


TOTAL 


WARD 


CLINIC 


NEW 
PATIENTS 


TOTAL 


WARD 


CUNIC 


Tuiv 


80 

107 
106 

121 
84 

74 
141 
148 
113 
141 

74 


1,432 
1,413 
1,588 
1,805 
1,560 
1,662 

1.532 
1.919 
2,451 
2,339 
2,305 
1,628 


361 
369 
441 
471 
411 
467 

449 
671 
791 
793 
836 
627 


1,071 
1,044 
1,147 
1,334 
1,149 
1.195 

1.083 
1.248 
1.660 
1,646 
1.469 
1.001 


28 
49 

47 
71 
62 
67 

75 
57 
68 
74 
79 
44 


633 
726 
7S1 
964 
941 
894 

786 
S>23 
921 
988 
1,047 
821 


99 
77 
241 
283 
338 
201 

223 
240 
200 

297 
30fi 
231 


534 


August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1940 

January 

February 

March 

a nril 


649 
540 
681 
603 
633 

562 

583 
721 
691 


\>fav -- - - 


741 


TitTie -- - -- 


590 






Total 


1,288 


21,634 


6,687 


14,947 


721 


10,324 


2,796 


7,528 



1938-1939 1939-1940 

Total Treatments - 56,196 65.784 

Total Patients 30,638 31,958 

Total New Patients , 1.712 2,009 

Number Working Days 306 306 

Daily Average Treatments 148 214 

Daily Average Patients 102 104 



74 CHARITY HOSPITAL— ] 939-1940 

REPORT OF CHARITY HOSPITAL GUILD 

July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1940 

Amputation Sponges 1 ,357 ,417 

Standards _ 546,059 

Tags... 203,000 

Masks - - 12,227 

Perineals 5, 109 

Lap-sixes. 22,422 

Compressed Dressings. . 40, 114 

Applicators _ , 7,783 

Central Service Sponges 4,3fl5 

Ampatation Pads. . 6 

Tonsil Tampons i 189 

Needle Cases __ , 170 



TotaL_ _ _ 2,198,891 

Accomplished by volunteer workers during the year: 

Number of meetings held__ _ 286 

Number of workers at meetings 3,201 

Number of dressings sent to the hospital from 1919 to June 30, 

1940 _ 12,301,783 



Morning meetings are held from 9:30 until Noon. Afternoon meetings are 
from 2:00 to 4:00. 

One meeting is held at the Sophie Gumbel Home from 9:00 a. m. until 
Noon on Thursdays, commencing with the first Thursday in October through 
May. ^ Mrs. R. H. Carter is in charge. 

The children of the Gumbel Home assist the ladies at their meeting and 
work with the ladies of the Guild during the week. For the past few years they 
have made over one half of the dressings. 

In closing this report I would like to say that this has been the largest year 
in the history of the Guild and I hope each year we will show an increase in our 
work. We are delighted with our lovely room. 

Mr8. C. Warren Gilmeb, 
President. 

Officers For the Year 

Honorary President for Life Sistek Stanislaus 

President Mas. C. Warre.n Gilmer 

1st Vice-President Mas, S. C. Jajuson 

2nd Vice-President _.. ..Mks. R. H. Carteu 

3rd Vice-President Miss G, McCat 

4th Vice-President Mrs. W. S. Amos 

Treasurer., Mrs. Harry Howard 

Recording Secretary... Miss Sakah Palfrey 

Corresponding Secretary Mias Adele Reynaud 

Publicity Chairman - Mrs. H. E. Kuhnbsh 



REPORT OP HOSPITAL GUIULD 



75 



M«B. J. J. Washington 



Board Mamb0i*s 

Mas. E. D. Simpson 



UBS. GKOBQE VlLLBRG 



Monday, a. m. 
Tuesday, a. m. 
Tuesday, p. m. 
Wednesday, a. ra. 
Wednesday, i>. in. 
Thursday, a. m. 
Thursday, p. m. 
Fri<Jay, a- m. 
Saturday, a. m. 



Members in Charge of Sections 

Miss G. McCay, Assistant, Miss G. Prochaska. 

Mrs. R. H. Fuselier, Mrs. P. Ganucheau, Mrs, W. Ganchcau. 

Mrs. J. E. Lusher, Assistant, Mrs. R. Clievis. 

Mrs. P. Jansen, Mrs. R. Dunham. 

Mrs, Jamts Calcagno, Assistant, Miss Nita SicarcUi. 

Mrs. G, A. Chehardy, As.sistant, Mrs. C. A. Brauner. 

Mrs. E. J. Nestor, Assistant, Mrs, Chas. Chehardy, 

Mrs. L. D, Barrett, Mrs. J. D. Nix, 

Scout Section — Mrs. N. J. Khoury in Charge. 



76 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT 

Sister Icnatia, R. N., Mame Eoudreaux, 

Director Secretary 

Beatkice Landry, R. N., 

Cliniu Supervisor 

Maky Jane McCarthy, R, N., 

Clinic Supervisor 

L£NORE AndBJB^S, R. N., 
Clinic Supervisor 



July 17, 1940 

To the Board of Administrators and Doctor Roy W. Wright, 
Director of the Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans. 

Gentlemen: 

I herewith submit the Annual Report of the Out Patient Department 
tor the fiscal year beginniKg July 1, 1939 and ending June 30, 1940. 

IMPROVEMENTS 

With our occupancy of the new clinics on July 31, 1939 has been 
muBO the soluuon to many of the problems which impeded our progress 
in tne old set-up. It is a recognized fact that the facilities of our new 
aepartment have made possible the graUfying accomplishments which cir- 
cumstances and conditions of our former location made impossible. 

During the construction period of the new Hospital the Out Patient 
iJepartment was inconveniently located two blocks away from the hospital 
proper, lo this handicap was added the equally distressing problem of 
inaaequate accommodations for the hundreds of patients who thronged our 
Clinics. In these crowded, undesirable conditions patients could not receive 
adequate medical care. 

It is only after having experienced the inconveniences of our former 
incommodious clinics that one can trulv appreciate the modernism of our 
presetit surroundings. This progrcM Fs observed not only in improved loca- 
tion, tiut aLso in the new X-ray facilities, Cystoscopic Room. Plaster Room 
ana l^aboratory, all of which arc now availalile for the exclusive use of 
clinic patients. 

Another step in advance of our past method o( admitting patients is 

if- u^ awaited and much needed Appointment System of Admissions, 

whicn we have been able to st-art in the new hospital. While not by any 

means perfect this undertaking is succeeding and wiU, eventually, re.sult in 

much better care for patients. 

Our moving into the new clinics has also made possible the rc-instate- 
ment of the Well Baby Clinic. At the present time this unit is not func- 
tiomng to our complete satisfaction because of the congested conditions 
prevalent at this writing. A necessary expansion to meet the needs of 
mother and baby calls for an increased staff and additional space. When 
the latter Iiave been acquired, we hope to open, in conjunction with the 
Well Baby Clinic, a Food Clinic which has been a need of long standing 
at Charity Hospital. 

PROBLEMATIC SITUATIONS 
WJtfle we gratefully acknowledge the extensive improvements and last- 
ing accompL'shments which have heralded our entrance into the new Out 



OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT 77 

Patient Department, it would be to overlook the best interests of Charity 
Hospital were we to fail to recognize the need for further improvements. 

At the present time we are occupying only the East Wing of the Out 
Patient Department. The need for the opening of the West Wing is greatly 
felt. The opening of this wing would eliminate many of our major prob- 
lems which will be noted as this paragraph continues. White patients are 
admitted on Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays, and colored patients are 
admitted on Tuesdays. Thursdays, and Saturdays. It is obvious, in view of 
the hundreds who seek aid at our clinics, that three days for the service 
of white patients and two and one-half for the service of colored patients is 
not adequate. There is no provision made for the care of patients who 
need dressings changed every day since white and colored patients are not 
to be mixed. The .Accident Room does not function for the treatment of 
clinic patients — their responsibility is the handling of emergencies; yet, if a 
white patient becomes ill on a Monday afternoon and is not sick enough 
10 be admitted to the hospital, it borders on the inhuman to send that 
patient home with the information that he is to come to the clinic on 
Wednesday to be treated. However, this is the only alternative and it hap- 
pens all too frequently, since white and colored patients are treated every 
other day. The only solution to this problem is the opening of the White 
Wing of th^ 0"t Patient Department. 

The overcrowded conditions existing in all the clinics create also certain 
outstanding problems in the special divisions within the department as, 
for example, the X-ray Room, Cystoscopic Room, Clinic Laboratory, Social 
Service, and Appointment Office. The problem becomes more acute in the 
Fracture, Orthopedic, Obstetrical, Gynecological, and Ear, Nose and Throat 
Clinics. 

For many years, we have advocated a Unit Record System which will 
make possible an in-service and out-service tie-up. Patients are discharged 
from one service on the wards and are seen in the clinic on another service, 
they are admitted from one clinic service to an opposite ward service. 
The patient derives little benefit from this procedure and it is emphatically 
a deterrent to the efficiency, interest, and educational advantages of the 
doctor and nurse alike. There is, also, a duplication of X-rays and Ittbora- 
torv work because of differences of doctors' opinions on individual cases. 
Not only is this an economic drain on the hospital but. again we repeat, 
it is indicative of poor medical care. 

Another disagreeable feature lies iQ the fact that no provision was made 
. j^jje new set-up for a general waiting room. This cannot be stressed 

forcibly. At present, we are using unoccupied admitting room space, but 
when this is not available we will again be confronted with the proldem of 
waiting patients lined down two city blocks. Quite naturally, this condi- 
t a eli'''t^ ^^^ most unfavorabJe comments from the puldic, 

A woefully insufficient nursing staff prevents proper supervision from 
this professional group and it affords a minimum of assistance to the 
natient as weU as to the doctor. Then, too, the shortage of nurses in the 
dinics. necessitates the placing of certain nursing duties on clinic attendants. 

There is a definite need for the opening of additional clinics, particu- 
1 lv for -'^'l^rgy, Contagious Diseases, and Arthritis. 



78 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



STATISTICS 

The following statistical tables present a picture of the huge amount of 
work done in the hosi>ilal's Out-Palient Department: 



Services 

Surgery _ 

Varicose Veins 

Tumor _ 

Fractures-- . 

Orthopedics , _ 

Plaster Room (Began 3-8-40) 

Obstetrics- - - _.. 

Post- Partum 

Gynecology 

Male Urology 

Female Urology 

Salvarsan 

Night Venereal Clinic (discon- 
tinued 9-30-39J 

Ophthalmology -.'.'.'.'. 

Ophthalmology (Refractions) 

Ear, Nose and Throat 

Dentistry -. 

Dentistry (House) -'.... 

Medicine 

Metabolic _ 

Cardiac -.'.'.'.....'. 

Neruo-Psychiatry- 

Pediatrics -....[ 

Well Baby (reJjistated"4^23^0)'I. 

Dermatology.- 

Allergy "...'.l 

Colored T. B 

Dibert T. B ".""."".1-111' 

Clinic Cystoscopic Room (began 



Inter- Total 

New Department Visits 
Cases Consultations 1939-40 



«,064 

47 

51 

879 

768 

'iiaei 

1,383 

1.811 

1,069 

351 

239 

28 

1,730 

13 

3,040 

1,704 

231 

3,231 

36 

24 

162 

3.089 

316 

1,374 

110 

172 

346 



43,360 
4,144 
1,36H 

7,323 

10,168 

777 

19,450 

285 

20,611 

16,518 

7,648 

104,081 

2,874 

21,337 

1,759 

27.260 

17,099 

2,556 

65,662 

4,314 

1,052 

5,014 

15,825 

242 

13,502 

10,839 

2,215 

3,821 

471 



49,424 
4,101 
1,419 
8.202 

10,936 
777 

20,811 
1,668 

22,422 

17,587 

7,999 

104,320 

2,902 

23,067 

1,772 

30,300 

19,403 

2.786 

70,893 

4.350 

1 .076 

5,176 

18,914 

558 

14,876 

10,949 

2,387 

4,167 

471 



Totals _ 31,62g 432,174 463,803 

Daily Avbbaqb of Patibnts 

^' m '^^ I'atients referred to Hospital for operation from Ear, Nose and 
Throat CSinics... 

No. of patients referred to Hospital for operation from Ophthalmol- 
ogy Clinics .- 

No. of minor operations in Surgical Clinics -.- 

No. of operations io G. V. for Men and Venereal Clinics- 

No. of patients referred to Hospital from Venereal Clinics 

No. of doses of Neoarsphenaminc given io Salvarsan Clinics 

No. of doses of Bismuth Subsalicylate given in Salvarsan Clinics... 

No. of doses of Tryparsamide given in Salvarsan Clinics 

No. of doses of Tartar Emetic given in Salvarsan Climes , . 

No. of doses of Bismarscn given in Salvarsan Clinics 

No. of doses of Sodium Thiosulphate given in Salvarsan Clinics. — 

No. of doses of Sulpharsphcnamine given in Salvarsan Clinics. 

No. of doses of Mapharscn given in Salvarsan Clinics .. 



Total 
Visits 

1938-39 

47,357 

4,458 

960 

8.169 

9,704 

"19. "665 

1 ,.540 

17.551 

16,486 

5 ,,572 

82,435 

6,16S 

20,796 

1,417 

23,986 

19,311 

2,482 

06,588 

3.456 

1,166 

6.059 

16.270 

13 [303 

8,555 

r .508 

604 



404,996 
1 ,526 

1,670 

1,037 

1,223 

01 

126 

30,974 

74.069 

1,427 

80S 

13,408 

1,232 

630 

2,729 



OUTPATIENT DEPARTMENT 79 

Total treatments given in Salvarsan Climes.. 125,277 

Total treatments given in Non- Venereal Clinics.. fi,487 

No of Spinal Punctures made in Salvarsan Clinics 1 , 505 

No of Mantoux Tests made in Pediatric Clinics 898 

No! of X-Rays made in Clinics 26,749 

No of Laboratory Tests mado in Clinics 74,624 

No of patients admitted to Hospital from Clinics 7,029 

No! of patients discharged from Clinics... 22J03 

No of Consultation Reports made in Clinics.. 20,728 

No! of Clinic Charts checked out 9,814 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

In view of the above problematic situations, we recommend that; (1) 
The West Wing of the clinic be opened immediately and needed addltiotial 
jpnient be supplied. (21 A Unit Record System be installed. This would 
insure better patient care, prevent duplication of X-rays and laboratory work 
and thus prevent additional financial abuse. (3) An In-Service and Out 
Patient tie-up be effected. This would necessitate all three services. L.S.U.. 
Tulane. and Independent, having clinics as well as ward services. (4) The 
pomtjletion of the installation of the compressed air system in E.N.T. clinic. 
If the patients could be properly treated many clinic visits could be elim- 

nated. lo' Equipment in Denta! and Eye Clinics, and also minor surgical 
"nstruioents and furniture, be supplied. (6) A. shelter be built to accommo- 
flate patients while they are waiting to be admitted to the clinics, (7* Night 
V nereal Disease Clinics be opened for the patients' convenience and as a 
\siblc remedy for daily over-crowded Salvarsan Clinics. (8) More nurses 
h employed as a means of insuring more efficient patient care. This would 

1 expedite the beginning of our Student Nurse program in the clinic. 
m A Health Unit for Employees. 

APPRECIATION 

■ttTe are gr.itefnl for the spacious quarters, improved facilities, and 

'oment afforded us in the new hospital. Especially do we wish to 

equip ^ our gratitude for the purchase of the much needed eye equipment. 

The Department also wishes to express gratitude to our Director and 

the two Assistant Directors, to the Board of .Administrators, to the 

1* jv^al Staff, both house and visiting, for their splendid service and coop- 

eratio"- 

T also wish to express sincere appreciation to my own staff for their 
l^valty an'' generous service. 
'°' RespectfuUy submitted, 

SISTER IGNATIA, R.N., B.S., 
Director, Out-Pattent Department. 



s 



MONTHS 



NEW CASES TREATED IN OUT-PATIENT DEPARTMENT 
For Fiscal Year 1939-1940 



July-- - 

August-. 

September 

October ,. 

November 

December 

January . 

February 

March 

April 

May... 

June 

Totals 



WHITE 
MALE 



(156 
781 
519 

ma 

473 

44» 
508 
613 
601 

7;)4 

700 



7,004 



COLORED 
MALE 



58» 
741 

66S 
587 
433 
441 
401 
001 
679 
689 
744 
720 



7,285 



WHITE 

FEMALE 



808 

982 

685 
684 
575 
472 
5(i4 
539 
717 
757 
900 
^0 



8,563 



COLORED 
FEMALE 



I I t 

851 
779 
7114 
549 
529 
4S3 
706 
814 
823 
905 
847 



8,767 



TOTAL 

WHITE 



1 ,464 
1.763 
1,204 
1,190 
1 ,048 
870 
1,013 
1,047 
1,330 
1,418 
1.634 
1 ,586 



15,, 567 



TOTAL 
COLORED 



1.305 

1,592 
1,444 

1,351 

988 

970 

884 

1,307 

1,493 

1,512 

1,649 

1,567 



16,062 



UALEB 



1,244 
1,522 

1,184 

1,093 

912 

839 

850 

1,109 

1,292 

1,350 

1.47S 

1,426 



14,298 



FEMALES 



1,525 

1,833 
1,464 
1,448 
1,124 
1,001 
1,047 
1,245 
1,531 
1.580 
1,806 
1,727 



17,330 



aRAND 
TOTAL 



2.769 
3,355 
2,648 
2,541 
2.036 
1,840 
1,897 
2,354 
2,823 
2,930 
3,283 
3,153 



31 ,029 



O 

> 
S 

H 
k! 

W 
O 
Ui 

> 

r 

I-" 

tc 
to 

CO 




A Bed Rooio in the Nurses' Home 



DEPAET.MENT OF ALLERGY 81 

ANNUAL REPORT, DEPARTMENT OF ALLERGY 

July 1, 1940 

To the Board of Administration 
Charity Hospital 
New Orleans, La., 

Gentlemen: 

I beg to submit this my report of the work done in the Aller^ clinic 
of the Charity Hospital during the fiscal year 1939-1940; From July 1st, 
1939 to June 30th, 1910 we treated 10,949 patients, an increase over the 
previous year of over 2,300 patients. 110 new patients applied for treatment 
and over 300 were referred from the other departments for consultations. 

The result in the 50 ragweed patients taking oral treatments was as 
foUowsr 24% are still practically free of symptoms, 27 were markedly 
improved, 17% stationary and 7% seems to have been aggravated by the 
pills. Deserted 25%. 

At an early date we will report the result of oral treatment on the 
spring cases. 

Cases treated according to the old methods by injections were classified 
as follows; 

Asthma — „_ ^.^% 

Hay Fever 26.6% 

Skin Allergy __„____ 9.3% 

The estimated result was as follows: 

Clinically cured _^_^__^__ 3% 

Very much imijroved ..___ 2 j>% 

Improved 67% 

Stationary 1S% 

Sincere thanks are offered to the Charity Hospital Pathological and 
pharmaceutical departments for their unfailing assistance and to the 
Lafayette Pharmaceutical Co. for their generous supply of experimental 
material. 

Respectfully submitted, 

NARCISSU F. THIBEROE, M. D, 

Chief, Department of .Allergy. 



82 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



ANNUAL REPORT, DEPARTMENT OR ANESTHESIA 

July 1st. 1940 

DuriiiB the past year a uumhtt of advances have heen made in this 
Department. Tbe greatest of these has been the acquisition of new equip- 
ment of the latest type and design, indudinc all of the leading models of 
gas machines. With the additional work occasioned bv the moving into the 
new hosjnta] and the opening of more operating rooms', the staff of graduate 
nurse anesthetists was increased from 13 to 16. and in spite of this increase 
It wiU be necessary to further staff this department to adequately care for 
all patients. t j 

Because of the scope of the work in this department, it has been found 
necessary to divide the staff into three units; one. headed by Miss Lillian 
heided rJl Muf p°,^'"''?i*'"'° •'° ^^^ general operating rooms; a second, 
orAnltd.^ ff I'^^i''. ^I^y^"' "" '=^^= °f instruction in the Department 
Ko«,^r ■ 1°^ the School of Nursing; and a third, headed by Miss Marv 
Koenig, in charge of Obstetrical anesthesia and analgesia. 

inp T,!hi*^^^!L-^* I""*^ of Sister Henrietta, Director of the School of Nurs- 
fhl K^^^i i"l ^=r^'==' tl"' standards of the Department of Anesthesia of 
Thp n^ri^rf Nursing have been increased and the corriculiim broadened. 
favorahlv ,. fJ",!''^''''?" '^ "'="' '-''«'" '8' months, and the course compares 
Thk n?^ !^ ' **' ^">' ^^^°°^ of nursing anesthesia in this Country-. 

in Ltiihf^ T^^- '■^^eived 432 requests for information concerning the cour^ 
anrt Q ,,, ""°^ *-^^ P^^ y^^""- 26 Students were installed for the course 

course. anesthetists were graduated. 23 students are now taking the 

durini. *E*hf of more than 16,000 anesthetics of all tvpes were administered 
tl,.* pn.;„,'^ .!.'''**''■ ^""^ " ^^ °nly through the earnest cooperation of 
the entire anesthesia staff that such results were possible. 

Respectfully submitted. 
C. B. ODOM, M. D.. 

Aue n 104/1 Director, Department of Anesthesia, 



DEPARTMENT OF ANESTHESIA 83 

REPORT OF 

ANESTHESIA DEPARTMENT 

July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1940 

GENERAL OPERATIKG ROOMS 

Drop Ether. __ -. 2,813 

Cyclopropane -- -- 774 

Cyclopropane-Ether Vapor 624 

Ethylene - 484 

Ethylene-Ether Vapor 2,353 

Ethylene-Drop Ether - - - 2 

Nitrous Oside .-_ - - - 2*0 

Nitrous Oxide-Ether Vapor l,7v5 

Nitrous-Drop Ether 

Local and General 29 

Spinal and General I™ 

Avertin and General - *" 

Evipal and General 3 

Avertin 21 

Evipal- - 19 

Pentotlial --- --- IJ 

Local - - »81 

Spinal--- -- 2.646 

rV- and Sacral ^ 

Epidural ,- - » 

No Anesthetic - -- 4 

Total Generals o'fnS 

Total without Generals.. 3.597 

Total -- 13,676 

OBSTETRICAL OPERATING ROOMS 

Nitrous Oxide-Ether Vapor — - - 1'^^? 

Nitrous Oxide '• k 

Ether - - - '5 

pudendal --- - ^ 

Ethylene - 4 

NaO-Drop Ether - -- * 

Sacral.- - - 17 

I^ocal - «l 

Spinal -....- 1 

Spinal and General.. * 

Local and General 4 

Evipal.-. 1 

Total 2,878 



84 CHARITY HOSPITAI^-1939-1940 



REPORT OF RECORD LIBRARY 
For Year Closing June 30, 1940 



To the Board of Administrators and 
Dr. Roy W. Wright. Director 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana 
at New Orleans 

Gentlemen; 



auarte"rs-i«'%J^p'''.J-^^\*^,^-^"^"'' ^'""^ «°^^<' f™" '^^ temporary 
quarters m the Pythian Building to the new hospital building. 

were^l.^^n^tfrf J^^^''^ Clinic Admitting Room and Clime Record Room 
rocrvki^n^f ( ° i''^ supervision of the Record Librarian. This includes 
obstctritT^L f"''^' ^'"■^•=^ '" ^'''''= ^""^ <^'''°«'l tuberculosis clinics and 
to h "o?^ice of tr"L "'"Tr -.^"^ *° "'f ^"accessibUity of these divisions 
rfl+r ■ ■ , Record Librarian and the obvious necessity for imme- 

RecordTrrar:l'""7"'r'u^'"- ^^"''^ ^'«^^ ''"^'^'^y- ^ worker ia The 
Xc°s ^''^"'^' "*^ ™ade full-time supervisor over the workers in these 

,.nit°to /hrw"^ ^""i ^^^- ^"^ I5i^l>^« Desk was instituted as an accessory 
BruUm. Thf ^'*'h^|'''*'^ 't"'^"', *^^ ^^^diate supervision of Mrs. Marion 
considered ora.H.«f T""..^ "^"'^ ^^' '°"S been recognized but was not 

ta^es^e I< ,^^ /™^ '° ^^^, occupation of the new building. The advan- 
ciillt d^thf P^Y"'^^ a central point from which all patients may be offi- 
Sf^he1^nfl*1 f'-onj the hospital; collects the records of all patients leav- 
^romnt SelivlV f '^u ''T "' '^' P^*'*^"*'^ discharge, and insures their 
ELee s « f?^]/'^ ^^^u^^T'^. ^'^'^'y: provides each patient with a 
finS treatill. ^ ^^ '*" ^T'°" "'>^^*' '"^'"'^^^ diagnosis, laboratory 
S for w,r ' ^""^ recommendations for their return to the hospital or 
^ for eL "^1 ^^^' 'V^^sists patients generally in leaving the hospital, 
S^/r^eSf Ih^^nl'Toltiar^ttr.^^ '""' transportation and, when n^ces- 

the comnflairo'!/?f''T'"^ Discharge Desk duties, this unit is responsible for 
twen^Sr n?" =. -'"'^ "^J^P'*^ ^^"^"^ ^^'^^ «^« formerly done by 

b^lZdTof^^Z.^r^f°^'\^^'^ '"^*''^«* *"* daily listing and tabulating 
i>> ward,s of admissions, transfers, desertions, deaths and discharges. 

hosnlt^ rhfilT'^^**^ *^"'" renfiered indicates that approximately 101.000 
requesfed bt th. h' '"'^''''"^ ^'""^ the files for study and 26,400 Were 
ance offfce anrf L^''"'!''"^^'"'^ °"'^^'- '"kernes, clinic, social service, insur- 
pulled and refiW r ^.u^'^'^' "-^P^^^^iting ^ total of 127,400 hospital charts 
reports were f W a14^\ ^^''^^ '° '^^ '-'''"'^ '^""^"^ ™°'" 27,654 x-ray 
reports wer7fii^'i4'«." '='«f«>sraph reports were filed, 99,000 pathology 
were ^Xrf V d''^^'?!' '^''^rts were pulled for salvarsan clinic, 6.048 charts 
annlintment. Th^* insurance office and 346.716 charts were pulled for 
rifiled for^he lar^ reP>-esents a total of 744.522 clinic charts pulled and 

I Should like to make the following recommendations: 

Ti,J'i^^i!i'^*'*1*'°" "M"** centralized unit system of maintaJnitiB records. 
This would automatically necessitate the combination of the Hospital and 
Clinic Admitting Rooms and the Hospital and Clinic Record Rooms. WhUe 
this change would entail an increase in personnel, I believe that this would 
be more than compensated for by the elimination of duplicate i-ray, laboru- 



REPORT OF RECORD LIBRARY 85 

tory and various other teats which are performed at considerable expense. 
In addition, a rontimtous record of the patient's illness, laboratory findings 
and treatment from time to time, is more complete and for that reason more 
desirable for the use of the physician during treatment of the patient and 
for future reference. 

(2) A more satisfactory method of incorporating x-ray reports, dicta- 
tions of operative procedures, et cetera in records. 

(3) Improved and more complete working facilities. 

(4) Adequate personnel. 

(4) Standardization of qualifications and salaries of personnel. 

The Record Library wishes to express its gratitude to the Director of 
the Hospital, Dr. Roy W. Wright, to the Assistant Directors, Dr. J. O. 
Weilbaecher and Dr. C. B. Odom, and to the Board of .Administrators for 
their cooperation and splendid counsel at all times. We gratefulty acknow- 
ledge, with appreciation, the a.ssistance rendered to this department by the 
Sisters of Charity, and the Resident and Visiting Staffs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH B. GREEN WALD, 

Registered Medical Records Librarian. 



Remaining at beginning of year (Fiscal).. _ 1,014 

Adinissions 63,852 

Remaining at end of year (Fiscal)... _ 2,411 

Total hospital days . 830,008 

Discharges - 60.000 

Oied - vJ.doo 

Average gross death rate (per cent) 6,3 

Deaths within 12, 24, 36 hours of admission__. __ 823 

Vyejage "et death rate (per cent) after deducting above _, 4.0 

Cases reported to coroner 84fl 

Daily Average 2,267 



84 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1939-1940 



REPORT OF RECORD LIBRARY 
For Year Closing June 30, 1940 

To the Board of Administrators and 
Dr. Roy W. Wright, Director 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana 
at New Orleans 

Gentlemen r 

r,«=St^"^Ku^^^' J.^^^'^^^^ Record Library moved from its temporary 
quarters m the Pythian Building to the new hospital buUding. 

Oa October 1st the Clinic Admitting Room and Clinic Record Room 
Z?^tJ-'^ , r^° ^^ supervision of the Record Uljrarian. This includes 
supennsion of clencal workers in white and colored tuberculosis clinics and 
to fhl ^fL f .T^Tj ''^"'Tr ..^"* *** "'^ inaccessibility of these divisions 
diJ.\t?lJ^f ^ ^l'?"'*'''^ Librarian and the obvious necessity for imme- 
RecorH nr "^ '^'^ r°^^- ^^- K<^'''<^ Voss Cooksey, a worker in the 

offices ^ '^'"^^- *^^ ""^'^^ f"ll-time supervisor over the workers in these 

,,n,>'^^ JhT^'^ ^}'r ?,^' '*•= Discharge Desk was insUtuted as an accessory 
Rrf^cL %?'"■'' .^j'"''^''*' ""<'^'' ^^"^ immediate supervision of Mrs, Marion 

coSredlr.'ct'J'^f "' T\^ '^"'^ ''^.^ ^°"^ ''^"'' recognized but was not 
f^^. »r! P'^'"=tieal prior to the occupaUon of the new building. The advan- 
ImZ 1\Lhi I";"y"''^^ \ ""f^ point from which all patients may be offi- 
fnt^l,^ h ^."'^ from the hospital; collects the records of all patients teav 
Dromnt d^fi^i^ f ^^* ^^^ "l '*"= patieofs discharge, and insures their 
dSL Irf?-,.''? the Record Library; provides each patient with a 
fin^.Ws tr^f.i f °^^ ^^' ^^^ '1°^'°'"' ^■^'''^ includes diagnosis, laboratory 
^^ie tr f ^T'*'- ^"'^ recommendations for their return to the hospital or 
ai fL^L!!^ 1 11^*'' '^ ^'-'^'^ patients generally in leaving the hospital, 

^rv Ue^-fi ;r"'"^ l^'^^ *"" ■■^^^'■^■'^^ f°^ transportation and, >vhcn neces^ 
sarj,, referring them to Social Service. 

the comndaHon^nf^tf '"! Discharge Desk duties, this unit is responsible for 
twen^HoMr n?.^ ^ '?'"'*' hospital census which was formerly done by 

brwards of .Hmi^"''-"'^'''.^'''^ '"™'^^^ *'"= ^^y ''^^'"g and tabulating 
oy wards of admission.., transfers, desertions, deaths and diiharges. 

hosoTl^ ch««i'\''^ ''^"'''^^ rendered indicates that approximately 101,000 
worsted btfhP.H' ""T^^-^ ''■'"" ^^^ f"" f°^ ^'"^y ^'^ 26,400 were 
Sice office JndL'°l""'u?-"'^ °"'^^"' i"te™es, clinic, social service, insur- 
^Ted and refiwT' ?!!"'^' ^^P««"tmg a total of 127.400 hospital charts 
renorts wer/ f h i'U*''^ *'"'"■ ^" ^'^^ ^""'"^ '■^''^t! room 27.6,M x-ray 
reports were fi id 'l^'ft^ electrograph reports were fUed, 99,000 pathology 
were^Xd ^^''\l^^^' •charts were pulled for salvarsan clinic, 6,048 charts 
rnnoin^r.Mt/ T.^^*^ insurance office and 346,716 charts wer« pulled for 
r^filed forthe -lar* represents a total of 744,522 clinic charts pulled and 

r Should like to make the following recommendations: 

Tu- '" \"^'^'t"''0" of the centralized unit system of maintaining records. 
^^. "?"'Q. automatically necessitate the combination of the Hospital and 
Ujnic Admitting Rooms and the Hospital and Clinic Record Rooms. While 
this change would entail an increase in personnel, I believe that this would 
be more than compensated for by the elimination of duplicate x-ray, labora- 



REPORT OF RECORD LIBRARY 85 

tory and various other tests which are performetl at considerable expense. 
in addition, a continuous record of the patient's illness, laboratory findings 
and treatment from time to time, is more complete and for that reason more 
desirable fnr the use of the physician during treatment of the patient and 
for future reference. 

(2) A more satisfactory method of incorporating x-ray reports, dicta- 
tions of operative procedures, et cetera in records. 

(3) Improved and more complete working facilities. 

(4) Adequate personneL 

(4) Standardization of qualifications and salaries of personnel. 

The Record Library wishes to express its gratitude to the Director of 
the Hospital, Dr. Roy W. Wright, to the Assistant Directors, Dr. J, O. 
Wcilbaecher and Dr. C. B. Odom, and to the Board of Administrators for 
their cooperation and splendid counsel at all times. We gratefully acknow- 
ledge, with appreciation, the assistance rendered to this department by the 
Sisters of Charity, and the Resident and Visiting Staffs. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ELIZABETH B. GREENWALD, 

Registered Medical Records Librarian. 



Remaining at beginning of year (Fiscal) l,Etl4 

Admissions C!l,85» 

Remaining at end of year (Fiscal) 2,411 

Total hospital days - *^l^-?3 

Discharges — - 60,000 

Died 6,SaD 

Average gross death rate (per cent) . 5.3 

Deaths within 12, 24, 36 hours of admission 823 

Average net death rate (per cent) after deducting above 4.0 

Cases reported to coroner _. 846 

Daily Average ~ - ^.^^i 



86 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1S40 
MONTHLY STATEMENT 



MONTHS 



1939 

July 

August 

September. 

October 

November. 
December. 

1940 

January 

February. . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total. 



■< 

a 
.J 



64,307 

64,948 
65,204 
67.272 
64,947 
63,451 



69,331 
73,475 
70,643 
73,127 
74,219 
73 ,094 



830,068 



o m 

< El 
« S! 

5g 






2,074 
2,095 
2,173 
2,170 
2,164 
2,046 



2.238 
2,533 
2,472 
2,437 
2,394 
2,436 



27,232 



a 



a 



5,817 
5,856 
5,664 
5,250 
4,863 
4,479 



5,444 
5,077 
5,105 
5,157 
5,496 
5,654 



63,852 



H 

s 

H 
o 

3 



5,334 
5,547 
5,337 
5,094 
4,49" 
4.618 



4,353 
4,6S6 
4,943 
4,947 
5,219 
5,425 



60,000 





(D 


s 


B 


•< 


s 


R 




a 


» 


262 


400 


302 


477 


265 


470 


242 


458 


265 


436 


287 


392 


369 


493 


347 


433 


289 


428 


243 


334 


257 


324 


227 


432 


3,355 


5.077 



« 

i£ 

o 

a 

o 
u 



54 
60 
37 
56 

m 



121 
98 
77 
40 
61 
59 



846 



COMPARATIVE TABLEAU 



July lat 1938 To June 30tK, 1939 

Admissions- ... o8,s99 

Discharges,.. 55,785 

Deaths _ 3,105 

Births. ._ _ 4,592 

Coroner's Cases. _ 639 

Hospital Days., 707,055 

Daily Average. 1,937 



July 1st, 1939 To June 30th, 1940 

Admissions.. 63,8.')2 

Discharges 60,000 

Deaths. _ 3,355 

Births -- 5,077 

Coroner's Cases. S4ii 

Hospital Days 830.0(i8 

Daily Average 2.21)7 



REPORT OP CLERK 



87 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 



July tst, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
DEATHS WITHIN 3S HOURS OF ADMISSION 



Patients Died in 
MONTHS 
1939 



July-- - 

August -- 

September __ 

October 

November 

December 

19-10 

January 

February- 

March- 

April 

May- 

June 

Total 



12 Houss 



37 
36 

40 
35 
37 
42 



57 
32 
42 
28 
25 
29 



440 



24 HouBS 



16 

22 

18 
21 
27 



31 
23 
23 
11 
15 
19 



242 



36 Hooks 



7 
10 
15 
11 
1-1 
11 



18 
19 
It 
(} 
9 
10 



Ml 



Total 



60 
OS 
71 
04 
72 
80 



106 
74 
70 
45 
49 
58 



823 



DEATHS 



MONTHS 
1939 



July-- 

August.- -.- 

Septeinl'er 

October 

November- 

peceoiber 

1940 

January 

February 

March 

April- 

May -- 

June 

Total 



54 
71 

S3 
62 
63 

77 



863 



WHITE 



15 
7 
13 
13 
14 
8 



11 


12 


90 


16 


77 


10 


79 


6 


69 


6 


59 


16 



136 



39 

43 
41 
40 
37 

35 



46 
65 
39 
38 
45 
24 



492 



6 
13 
10 
4 
3 
5 



79 



< 

O 

H 



111 

129 
116 

121 
121 
126 



174 
184 
136 
127 
123 
104 



1,552 



64 

73 
40 
63 
55 
73 



79 
67 
61 

48 
51 

57 



730 



COLORBD 



16 
20 
30 

17 
18 
24 



24 
26 
20 

16 
16 
14 



241 



55 
64 
45 
41 
53 
49 



S2 
66 
55 
41 
5S 
37 



616 



16 
16 
25 
10 
18 
15 



18 
26 
17 
11 
9 
15 



196 



151 
173 
149 
121 
144 
101 



173 
1S5 
153 
116 
134 
123 



1.783 



88 



CHARITY HOSPITA^-1939-1940 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
ADMISSIONS 



WHITE 



MONTSS 



1939 

July -_ 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1940 

January, . , 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

Total 



Malks 



1,132 
1,123 
1,066 
1,001 
960 
873 



1,030 
1,151 
1.027 
1,00,5 
994 
1,02S 



12,390 



BoTs 



419 
417 
376 
311 
282 
284 



261 
288 
272 
287 
305 
329 



3,831 



Females 



1,410 
1 .434 
1,344 
1,267 
1,108 
908 



1,094 
1,218 
1,124 
1,230 
1,230 
1,297 



14,. '564 



Girls 



324 
309 
294 
279 
226 
219 



219 
239 
203 
235 
260 
288 



3,19.? 



Total 



3,286 
3,283 
3,080 
2.858 

2,576 
2,284 



2,604 
2,896 
2,626 

2,757 
2,789 
2,942 



33,980 



COLORED 



Months 



1939 

July 

August 

Scptt'tnbcr 

October 

November 

December 

1940 

January. . 

February 

March. 

April 

May 

June. 



Total.. 



Males 



739 
672 
705 
6S4 
594 
653 



».69S 
726 
657 
739 
741 
730 



8,335 



Boys 



315 
355 

338 
349 

303 
293 



336 

317 
357 
302 
351 
364 



3,980 



Females 



1,208 
1,248 
1,2.58 
1,120 
1,10s 
1 ,OCW 



1,169 
1,218 
1 , 183 
1,107 
1,346 
1,317 



14.282 



GiBLS 



3.275 



Total 



270 


2,532 


298 


2,573 


273 


2,574 


239 


2.392 


282 


2.287 


249 


2,195 


273 


2,473 


287 


2.548 


282 


2,479 


252 


2,400 


269 


2,707 


301 


2.712 



29.872 



White Male Adults. . 12,390 

White Boys 3.831 

White Female Adults 14,564 

White Girls 3,195 



Colored Male Adults... 

Colored Boys 

Colored Female Adults. 
Colored Girls 



. 8.335 
. 3,980 
.14,282 
. 3,275 



Total 33.980 

Grand Total 



Total 29.872 



.63,852 



REPORT OF CLERK 



89 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPT. 
July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
Age Groups of Patients Expir«d 



WHITE 



Under 1 year.. 

1 to S years 

5 to 10 years 

10 to 15 years 

15 to 20 yeiirs 

20 to 25 years 

26 to 30 years 

30 to 40 years 

40 to 50 years 

50 to 60 years 

60 to 80 years 

80 to 90 years 

go to 100 years_ 

1 00 years and upward 

tlflkiiown 

TOTAb 



15 

I 
1 
6 
3 
2 

12 
S 

20 

34 
4 


5 



lit 129116 



15 

2 

3 

2 

1 

I 

3 

17 

12 

18 

39 

1 

1 



25 

3 

1 

3 

2 



6 

18 

18 

26 

50 

11 

1 

1 

6 



21 121 126 174 184 136 127 123 104 1S72 



8 

2 

1 



3 

1 

6 

15 

15 

29 

40 

5 

1 



2 



4 

1 
2 
2 
1 
2 
4 

13 

14 

23 

49 

(i 

U 



2 



o 



177 

23 

19 

19 

34 

26 

63 

160 

162 

277 

499 

70 

6 

1 

37 



Aji« Groups of Patlentt Expired 



COLORED 



Under 1 year 

1 to 5 years 

5 to 10 years 

JO to 15 years 

15 to 20 years 

20 to 25 years 

25 to 30 years 

go to 40 years 

40 to 50 years 

50 to 60 years 

60 to 80 years 

go to 90 years 

go to 100 years 

lOO years and upward 

Unknown 

Total 



151 



25 

8 

2 

3 

8 

9 

12 

25 

22 

25 

19 

1 





14 



173 149121 



36 

1 



3 

5 

3 

8 

14 

17 

18 

31 







9 



3S 
1 
2 
2 

7 

10 

24 

21 

23 

19 

2 





11 



33 

3 

7 

3 

4 

7 

il 

10 

2« 

18 

20 

1 

2 



16 



51 
3 

I 
7 

8 

10 

16 

15 

25 

33 

3 





10 



28 
3 

6 
3 

10 
7 

IS 

15 

IS 

33 

1 

1 



10 



144 161173185 153 116 134 123 1783 



23 
3 

1 

3 

3 



16 

20 

20 

17 

1 



3 



22 



3 

1 

2 

6 

4 

22 

2() 

23 

20 

2 

1 



3 






373 

35 

22 

34 

43 

74 

00 

235 

229 

240 

280 

19 

6 



103 



90 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



REPORT OF THE STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT 

AOMISStONS BY PARISHES 

July tst, 1939 to June SOih, 1940 



Acadia _ _ 

Allen 

Ascension 

Assumption 

Avoyelles^ 

Bienville 

Bossier , 

Beauregard 

Caddo . 

Calcasieu 

Caldwell I-I-" 

Cameron . 

Catahoula 

Claiborne 

Concordia . 

DeSoto S...W__ 

East Baton Rouge 2 

East Feliciana _".!! 

East Carroll 

Evangeline W.W 

Franklin 

Foreign 

Grant "J 

Iberia 

Iberville, 

Jackson '" 

Jefferson I. " 3 

Jefferson Davis I "" 

Lafayette "' 

Lafourche " i 

LaSalle- '".'SS.W 

Livingston 

Lincoln _ S..S.. 

Madison ^, 

Morehouse ^__ 

No Home 

Natchitoches 



183 

173 

987 

583 

720 

19 

2 

4) 

40 

363 

60 

10 

63 

10 

93 

8 

,119 

392 

152 

158 

97 

7 

54 

373 

861 

26 

,552 

147 

99 

.483 

34 

683 

18 

143 

128 

111 

69 



Orleans 33,778 

Other States 284 

Ouachita__ 158 

Plaquemine 474 

I'ointc Coupee 600 



Rapides. 

Kcd River 

Richland 

Sabine 

St. Bernard 

St. Charles 

St. James 

St. John the Baptist. 

St. Helena__ ,. 

St. Landry 

St. Mary 

St. Martin- 



232 

6 

106 

88 

740 

734 

653 

909 

139 

565 

794 

00 

St. Tammany- 1.686 

Tangipahoa 2,913 

Terrebonne 2,099 



Tensas. 

Union 

Unknown- 
Vermilion- 
Vernon 



76 

33 

67 
183 

46 
Washington 1,902 

16 
273 

44 
147 

79 



WebstcT- 

West Baton Rouge. 

West Carroll 

West Feliciana 

Winn - . 



Total 63,862 



Residence at time of Admission 

City 33.778 

Louisiana .29,605 

Foreign _ 7 

No Home_- 111 

Other States 284 

Unknown.. 67 



Total., ..-63.852 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 



July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 

OELGADO 

Ward Number ._ 266 267 268 268a 369 370 371 371a 472 473 474 474a Total 

Admitted 361 191 177 228 GCil 314 216 307 330 122 95 114 3,116 

Rtceived by Transfer.- 93 38 37 68 81 31 38 35 34 5 9 13 482 

Discharged _ .__ 349 170 105 253 536 291 213 223 280 83 82 112 2,757 

Transferred _ 50 2G 26 18 163 49 39 46 65 35 31 26 574 

Deserted 59 31 29 24 49 46 32 35 32 13 5 8 363 

Died 18 11 10 15 25 16 18 9 26 6 3 1 158 



Ward Number. . 156a 156 

Admitted 79 234 

Received by Trans- 

fer-_ 31 90 

Discharged 94 265 

Transferred 7 24 

Deserted 6 27 

Died .5 8 



MILLIKEN 

157 1S8 Obs. R. R. R. 

205 241 1,348 



64 

232 

19 

IS 

6 



73 
259 

46 
22 
13 





13 

1,098 

19 

18 



40 

1 
45 


1 



261 

258 

20 

247 

10 

23 

1 



262 

331 

32 

85 
11 
43 
11 



. WHITE FEMALE MEDICAL 

Ward Number .__ 101 102 

Admitted ._ 603 491 

Received by Tratisfer _ 63 56 

Discharged 420 361 

Transferred 86 127 

Deserted 44 31 

Died - 27 44 



260 

433 

13 
358 
14 
44 
41 



259 

351 

27 

348 

12 

17 

4 



365 363 Nursery Total 

440 1,436 1,320 6,676 



53 19 
418 1,355 

54 21 
23 85 

4 3 



1 

885 

9 

62 

34 



463 

4,560 

J. 370 

389 

149 



201 


202 


301 


302 


Total 


571 


336 


668 


638 


3,107 


75 


92 


64 


102 


452 


481 


352 


521 


624 


2,769 


126 


33 


84 


67 


523 


41 


26 


19 


64 


225 


28 


■ 10 


7 


3 


119 



w 

M 
>V 
O 
!S 
H 

O 

at 
H 

> 

H 
t-^ 
cn 
1-3 

t— c 

a 
> 

d 

> 

H 

Z 

H 



M 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
CONVALESCENT HOME 

Ward Number. __ .„ l. M. L. M. L. M. L. M. 

2 2a Zb 3 

Admitted _ ^ 262 79 110 313 

Received by Transfer _ _ __ jg 22 24 51 

Discharged .__ -/_ 21O 64 110 313 

Transferred __ , _ 26 6 36 89 

Deserted. -_ 10 2 27 

^'^^ 31 1 I 8 



Ward Number L, m_ 

"4a ' 

Admitted _ _ jgy 

Received by Transfer II"""mrr S4 

Discharged 176 

Transferred 29 

Deserted 23 

Died g 



L. M. 
4b 

181 
36 

178 
27 
14 
11 



L. M. 
4c 

145 
S3 

174 
20 
12 
10 



DIBERT 

Ist and 2nd Floor 



L. M. 
5 

220 
IS 

199 
22 
11 
15 



L. M. 
3a 

378 
37 

357 

54 

21 

4 

L. M. 
5a 

290 
24 

254 

42 

21 

4 



L. M. 
3b 

284 
70 

314 

39 

17 

8 

L. M. 
Sb 

140 

11 

130 

12 

6 

9 



L. M. 
3e 

275 
31 

248 

36 

25 

2 



227 
16 

130 

39 

22 

3 



L. M. 

4 

342 
74 

360 

47 

38 

8 



L. M. Total 
Sc 



3,407 
534 

3,216 
523 
249 
123 



Ward Number 176 

Admitted 3f>4 

Received by Transfer. _ 46 

Discharged 118 

Transferred 233 

Deserted 14 

Died JQ 



177 178 179 180 181 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 Total 



9 
30 
23 
29 

4 
10 



3 
13 

8 

3 
5 



4 

30 

11 

13 

5 

3 



8 
24 
19 
4 
4 
7 



170 

m 

42 

145 

10 

3 




15 

2 
12 



5 



4 
25 
13 
7 
3 
4 



4 
19 
8 
2 
9 
2 



11 
19 
15 
3 
9 
10 



9 

24 

13 

17 

2 

4 



38 
13 
17 

7 
6 



4 

34 

13 

13 

3 

7 



597 
333 
29S 
495 
73 
85 



O 

> 

w 

•I 
H 
«! 

a 
o 

ai 

TS 

> 

r 

!£> 

CO 

to 



\WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July 1st, 1939 to June Ist, 1940 

DIBERT 
3rd arid 4th Floor 

Ward Number. 392 394 395 39$ 397 398 399 403 404 405 406 

Admitted.- 3 710 56 10 2343 

Received by 

Transfer 2 36 26 27 13 26 16 9 12 19 14 

Discharged 19 12 10 33 15 IS 4 7 12 10 

Transferred 1 16 19 17 1 6 3 2 1 2 2 

Deserted 04 5 64442231 

Died 07 61523584 

*Ward Number 4^3 

Admitted j^q 

Received by Transfer I1II-"".I_.~III""" 37 

Discharged HII" I* 150 

Transferred I-I""III1"IIIIIII 12 

Deserted n 

Died ----I1II"II---"III!"" 'I ""'""" 

*-Were T. and A. Wards. 



CONTAGIOUS 

Ward Nutnber ^ 148 

Admitted -"-""""""" 317 

Received by Transfer "I'll"" 51 

Discharged gu 

Transferred 'I.IIII^lll 14 

Deserted 17 

Died I "I" 14 



248 

561 

158 

585 

60 

16 

47 



348 
133 
86 
410 
26 
63 
36 



407 

7 

33 
20 

2 

4 
10 

404 

271 

35 

278 

11 

2 

2 



448 

304 

85 

178 

132 

29 

29 



408 
2 

10 
7 
1 
2 
1 



409 Total 

63 



10 
5 

13 
1 




405 

264 
24 

270 
9 
2 
2 



548 

260 
51 

235 
22 
28 
21 



253 

172 

85 

42 

58 

Total 

681 

96 

098 

32 

4 

2 



Total 

1,878 
431 

1,719 
255 
143 
147 



Eg 
O 
H 
O 

>• 

w 
>^ 

o 

o 

H 
> 

H 



to 



Ward Numb«r 

Admitted 

Received by Transfer. 

Discharged 

Transk-rred 

Deserted 

Died.._ 

Ward Number 

Admitted. 

Received by Transfer. 

Discharged 

Transferred 

Deserted 

Died. _ 



234 

201 
39 

115 
70 
21 

n 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July lEt, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
COLORED 
234a 234b 234c 234d 234e 23G 237 238 239 434 436 437 438 439 



235 
57 

233 

33 

21 

6 



242 
40 

2:J5 
3fi 
17 
15 



23S 
61 

230 
47 
30 
11 



22C1 
fl2 

220 
38 
20 
13 



236 339 427 511 307 301 392 

39 f.2 62 65 27 94 109 

213 342 425 493 266 299 384 

fi3 68 86 66 62 55 52 

19 19 35 25 19 20 32 

6 6 17 10 22 31 



410 324 

103 m 

390 317 

62 38 

29 29 

25 20 



240 
38 

165 
79 
32 
16 



Ti>taJ 

4,634 
920 

4,326 
865 
368 
221 



334 

2,695 
36 

2,815 

100 

65 

16 



Nursery Total 

1,921 4.616 

1 17 

1,783 4,398 

102 202 



33 
117 



98 
133 



COLORED T. B. 



17 
9 

1 
4 



Ward Number 234 23S 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 434 436 437 438 439 Total 

Admitted 18 

Received by Transfer.. 19 

Discharged 10 

Transferred 2 

Deserted 

Died... 10 



8 
17 
7 

1 
2 



9 
IS 
12 
1 
1 
3 



4 
9 
10 
1 





3 
12 
7 
1 





48 
9 

27 

33 
9 

11 



29 

8 

31 

17 

5 

4 



155 

137 

136 

58 

25 

43 



O 

> 

«! 

o 
> 



to 






WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July 1st, 1939 to June 3(Hh, 19A0 

OLD COLORED T. B. 

fCldsi-d Taiiviary 1940) 

Ward Number L. S. U.a 

Admitted 6 

Received by Transfer . 29 

Discharged 22 

Transferred 17 

Deserted 4 

Died , 9 



T. U.a L. S. U.b 



10 
23 
19 
19 
6 
12 



19 

16 

13 

3 

8 



PYTHIAN TEMPLE 

fCloscd August 1039) 

Ward Number-.. 320 321b 321e 420 422 520 522 6Z0 621 622 720 721 

Admitted 206 32 47 90 S8 133 m US IIC 73 100 89 

Received by Trans- 
fer 75293 12 4 12 74 13 2 

Discharged _ 1C9 24 44 142 76 98 63 121 100 58 7R 44 

Transferred 42 9 12 45 4 64 7 7 8 7 31 39 

Deserted-.. 8 3 2 9 28 3 17 27 3(i 7 14 6 

Died 23 4 1 33 2 22 8 1 1 1 5 17 

NEW BUILDING 3fiD FLOOR WHITE 

Ward Number 300a 300b 302 303 304 305 306 307 308 309 310 

Admitted 138 157 182 63 90 139 161 113 125 126 103 

Received by Transfer.- 19 25 31 5 20 35 30 23 20 20 28 

Discharged-. 107 129 172 49 92 122 133 87 83 110 96 

Transferred 20 27 19 12 12 21 30 31 30 38 13 

Deserted 02 10 34465779 

Died 15 19 5 9 13 15 10 14 4 8 



r. U.b 


Total 


» 


9 
17 


38 
88 


t 
o 


12 


69 


W 


14 


63 


H 


3 


16 


O 


9 


38 


> 


722 


723 Total 




105 


88 1,350 


> 


12 


6 98 


V 


80 


76 1,109 




42 


24 331 


10 


9 178 


►fl 


10 


13 153 


> 

•-3 










jS 






H 


311 


312 Total 


^ 


124 


3 i.r.3;{ 


Z 


23 


285 


H 


70 


2 1,261 




30 


1 284 




11 


74 




12 


124 


at 



CO 

at 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
NEW euiLoma ath floor white 

Ward Numbsr _. 400a 400b 402 403 404 405 406 407 408 409 

Adtnilled . 247 295 313 182 2(;3 287 321 219 234 274 

Received hy Transfer. 27 39 23 33 55 49 64 40 40 47 

Dischargtcl._ ISO 244 285 153 202 237 209 188 182 109 

Transferred 30 30 22 25 01 48 03 48 33 48 

gpserted 16 23 25 12 21 15 27 16 16 23 

Died _ 38 3(1 <) 5 23 28 33 38 41 27 

NEW BUILDINCS BTH FLOOR WHITE 

Ward Number 502 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 

Admitted 209 166 142 144 189 101 118 7S 

Received by Transfer 23 23 27 24 36 24 23 25 

Discharged 186 168 134 126 157 96 115 77 

Iransrcrred _ 23 11 17 21 28 13 11 7 

Deserted 4737 10 233 

D'ed 3 2 2 14 9 2 4 1 



410 411 412 413 Total 



225 209 

46 29 

217 197 

43 25 



16 
31 



127 

26 

123 

12 

4 

4 



16 
27 



9 3,081 

17 515 

2 2,497 

4 483 

226 

336 



510 511 513 Total 



117 

14 

104 

19 

8 





40 

3 

37 

3 



1,434 

244 

1,313 

165 

52 

41 



a 
> 

2 

•< 

w 
o 

a> 

y-i 

> 

r 

so 



Ward Number. W.N.I. 

Admitted 138 

Received by Transfer. . , _ 

Discharged 128 

Transferred- . 7 

Deserted 2 

Died '" 1 



HEW BUILDING eTH FLOOR WHITE 

604 605 606 607 608 



40 

13 

36 

4 



2 



254 

21 

317 

10 

5 

2 



42 

13 

46 

3 

3 





102 
17 

203 
9 
3 
1 



37 

12 

35 

6 

3 

1 



609 

115 

36 

129 

20 

2 

3 



610 611 612 613 Total 



3S 

14 

46 

3 

2 

I 



99 
28 
90 
17 
6 
1 



22 
3 

19 
1 

2 



63 
12 
42 
11 
4 
1 



950 

175 

1,090 

93 

30 

15 



o 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July 1st, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
NEW BUILDING 7TH FLOOR WHITE 



Ward Number..- _ 702 703 

Admitted 271 200 

Received by Transfer 22 30 

Discharged ..._ 224 182 

Transffrred _ _ Ig n 

Deserted )7 12 

Died 11 12 



704 

138 

35 

132 

18 

9 

9 



705 

204 
36 

194 

18 

11 

4 



706 
171 

33 

149 

18 

19 

6 



707 
ISl 
44 
146 
19 
21 
10 



New BUILDING 8TH FLOOR WHITE 



Ward Number W.R.R. 802 

Aflmitted___ __ 92 8! 

Received by Transfer. 184 13 

Discharged 98 75 

Transferred 148 3 

Deserted . 28 3 

Died 17 2 



803 

68 

g 

59 
3 
4 




804 
110 
22 
98 
17 
10 
12 



805 
81 
24 
60 
15 
4 
9 



806 

114 
18 
00 
22 
10 
3 



807 

102 

32 

101 

13 

6 

8 



808 

112 

16 

100 

13 

3 





NEW BUILDING STH FLOOR WHITE 



708 

108 

28 

93 

7 

13 

8 



809 

122 

16 

110 

14 

5 

4 



709 

174 

33 

152 

22 

13 

6 



810 

88 
27 
90 
24 
4 
2 



710 

150 

22 

133 

12 

9 

5 



811 

92 
22 
78 
12 
8 
6 



9O0 

Ward Number a, b, c, & d 

Admitted 477 

Received by Transfer 83 

Discharged 433 

Transferred 48 

Deserted- . 17 

Died I 2 



711 

168 

33 

155 

24 

14 

3 



812 

31 

5 

24 

12 

4 





713 
59 
4 
51 
5 
3 




813 

67 
16 
52 
13 
5 
7 



902 


903 


904 


905 


906 


907 


908 


909 


910 


911 


111 


103 


255 


140 


86 


156 


230 


70 


193 


159 


16 


14 


27 


24 


22 


21 


12 


14 


19 


17 


86 


87 


193 


84 


121 


121 


216 


62 


184 


123 


5 


17 


18 


14 


16 


18 


11 


4 





20 


6 


7 


11 


9 


8 


10 


8 


5 


5 


12 


3 





1 


10 


2 


16 





S 


1 


10 



Total 

1,824 
320 

1,611 

172 

141 

73 



Total 

1,160 
403 

1,041 

309 

101 

70 



Total 

1,980 

269 

1,710 

177 

98 

63 



W 

13 
o 
ft) 

O 

*^ 

m 

> 

I— t 
Wl 
H 

I—* 

O 

r 
> 

^^ 

K 



10 
•J 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNrGHT 
Jury Isi, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 

NEW BUILDING 1 OTH FLOOR WHITE 



Ward Number 

Adiiiilti'd . . 

Received by Transfer- 
Disc liargtd _, 

Transferred 

Dcsertttd 

Died - 



NEW BUILDING 1 1TH FLOOR WHITE 



Ward Num 

Admitted... 
Received by 
Discharged . 
TransfcrrL-d . 
Deserleil 
Died-. 



ber . 



Transfer - 



1102 

163 
43 
136 
46 
5 
3 



1103 

117 

29 

99 

23 

5 

•y 



1104 

23 

142 

18 

4 

1 



110S 

128 

45 

135 

21 

13 

'J 



1106 

179 

21 

tC9 

17 

3 





1107 

130 
17 

IHi 

12 

10 

1 



1108 

IS» 

25 

142 

1<) 

4 

2 



NEW BUILDtNG 3FID FLOOR COLORED 



1109 

120 

29 

123 

10 

7 





Mothers 

1,124 
16 

1,079 

10 

47 

6 



ino 

1(J8 
23 

!,'i2 

18 

13 





1111 

112 

20 

105 

29 

4 





Nursery 

754 

2 

079 

40 

27 

17 



Total 

1,878 
1» 

1.758 
50 
74 
23 



1112 

4 


1 






1113 

85 
16 
77 
12 

5 

2 



Total 

1.507 

290 

1.396 

220 

73 

13 



Ward Number 300a 300b 302 303 304 30S 

Admitted- 152 Kil 15.5 75 177 210 

Received by Transfer 17 25 63 11 32 45 

Discharged. 93 113 )57 82 159 152 

Transferred.. 38 27 25 14 37 33 

Deserted-. _ 6 9 13 2 3 11 

Died 24 28 8 4 17 24 



306 307 30e 309 310 311 

207 240 194 197 184 207 

3S 38 49 32 35 fil 

138 174 155 153 142 148 

64 ,59 34 60 143 44 

8 13 10 12 5 5 

23 32 15 17 20 22 



312 313 Total 

8 7 2.171 

7 454 

12 1,682 

2 572 

97 

234 



O 
> 

I— i 

H 

o 

> 

r 

to 

oa 
CO 
I 

o 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 

July 1st, 1S39 to June 30th, 1940 

NEW BUILDING 4TH FLOOR COLORED 

Ward Number 400a 400b 402 403 404 405 40S 407 408 409 410 411 

Admitted __ tl2 199 242 68 190 249 221 250 215 253 210 120 

Received by Transfer 14 33 53 11 42 29 40 26 29 17 29 20 

Discharged., 89 146 221 60 166 196 161 201 168 195 153 171 

Transferred IS 35 21 7 31 28 33 36 40 41 35 31 

Deserted __ 3 7 16 065 12 74624 

Died 9 31 18 2 24 26 43 22 26 24 27 26 

NEW BUILDING 6TH FLOOR COLORED 

Ward Number 602 503 504 505 506 507 508 509 510 511 

Atlmiiied _ 131 128 105 122 129 119 112 112 112 103 

Received by Transfer 13 19 25 41 26 36 24 12 17 33 

Discharged 100 114 94 135 125 122 102 131 76 103 

Transferred ,_ 14 8 18 8 24 13 15 29 19 10 

Deserted 4930734963 

Died fi 3 3 10 C 6 4 1 5 3 

NEW BUILDING STH FLOOR COLORED 

Ward Number. 602 604 60S 606 SOT 603 SOS S10 611 612 

Admitted 66 105 370 95 121 93 346 126 112 5 

Received by Transfer __ 9 26 26 22 39 21 32 25 39 5 

Discharged 47 IQO 332 80 104 80 304 110 93 7 

Transferred 10 29 43 26 42 27 61 33 40 3 

Deserted 107051 12 540 

Died 22416 20200 



412 413 Total 

3 10 2.348 

6 353 

10 1.940 

6 364 

73 

27S 



513 
33 
2 
25 
2 
2 




Total 

!,230 

248 

1,127 

160 

50 

46 



613 


Total 


54 


1,493 


22 


260 


37 


1.294 


26 


330 


5 


40 


1 


20 



w 

H 
C 

w 

O 

CO 

> 

CO 

O 
> 

o 



s 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 
July tst, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
NEW BUILDtNG 7TH FLOOR COLORED 

Ward Number 70z 703 704 705 706 707 708 

Admitted . 135 [2(i 100 117 139 86 102 

Ri^ccivcd by Transfer Ki is m u 10 15 10 

Discharged _ io4 110 S5 HI 117 78 88 

Transferred _ H 14 IS 14 15 9 U 

^^serttd ._ 6 5 3 9 4 4 5 

Died 8 4 8 3 9 11 

NEW BUILDING 8TH FLOOR COLORED 
C«l. 

Ward Number R. R. 802 803 804 805 806 807 808 809 

AcJtnitted _.. 82 394 258 136 183 15(i Uil 141 174 

Rcccu'c-d by Transfer... 131 38 32 22 32 2(5 31 33 2f) 

Discharged 70 380 230 129 174 ISO 148 128 135 

Transferred 110 22 31 6 19 13 12 34 28 

Deserted. _ 9 1 5 2 4 4 10 5 14 

O'cd 18 3 I 4 10 3 11 2 U 

NEW BUILDING 9TH FLOOR COLORED 

Ward Number.. ._ 902 905 907 

Adraittctl 1 304 451 

Received by Transfer 35 SO 

Discharged.. 1""""!!!! 278 347 

Transferred 1 15 40 

gpertcd lll"""llll"""l 12 11 

D>ed .._ 14 70 



709 710 711 713 Total 



82 
20 
82 
12 
5 
4 



BIO 

20(1 

U) 

135 

24 

8 

5 



909 

170 

44 

200 

19 

6 

8 



96 

n 

82 

11 

3 

8 



110 

17 

OS 

17 

5 

6 



811 

11)4 

10 

139 

22 

6 

8 



911 
556 

38 
398 
44 
12 
62 



28 
3 

27 
2 
3 
1 



812 

37 
5 

28 
7 
3 
1 



1,127 

147 

986 

134 

52 

68 



813 Total 

12s 2,220 

2(J 440 

120 1,975 

19 347 

7 78 

4 81 



913 

59 

2 

30 






Total 
1.561 

169 

1,253 

119 

41 

144 



O 
X 



X 

o 

S 

> 

T 

so 
IM 
CO 
I 
»-* 

to 

lb. 



WARD CENSUS 12:00 MIDNIGHT 

July Ut, 1939 to June 30th, 1940 
NEW BUILDING 10th floor COLORED 

Ward Number ^ ». Mothers 

Admitted ._ 1,498 

Rcctived by Transfer 83 

Discharged.. I,4fl8 

Transferred ,; , 22 

Deserted 13 

Died 3 

NEW BUILDING 1lTH TLOOB COLORED 

Ward Number 1102 1103 1104 1105 1106 1107 1108 1109 1110 

Admilied. 131 112 142 111 147 80 120 7(5 119 

Received by Transfer... 25 11 13 28 17 31 18 19 15 

Discharged 125 81 117 107 133 82 106 79 115 

Transferred 23 24 11 15 13 8 16 9 6 

Deserted 10 4 5 7 7 8 11 

Died 2 6 11 12 2 2 2 



Nursery Total 



ADMITTING ROOM 



Admitted. 
Died 



White 


Colored 


Total 


23 
23 


20 
20 


43 
43 



1.123 


2,021 


03 


145 


1,042 


2,500 


13 


35 


4 


17 


45 


48 



1111 1113 Total 



101 


7 


1,146 


33 


1 


2)1 


101 


2 


1,068 


14 


4 


142 


3 


I 


38 


4 





23 



w 

•V 

o 
w 
1^ 

o 

'^ 

en 

> 
H 

l-i 

to 

I— I 

> 
r 

o 

H 

> 



Autopsies In heavy black. 



ANNUAL REPORT 
June 30, 



OF THE RECORD LIBRARY 
1939 to July 1, 1940 



Observation Room 

Medicine . . 

Neurology 

Dermatology 

Contagious 

Pediatrics 

Urology 

Surgery- 

Dental Surgery . . . 

Fracture 

Orthopedics 

Opthalmology 

Otolaryngology. . . 

Gynecology 

Obstetrics 

New Borns 

Prematures 

TOTAL 



P 
£ 
J 






US 

11300 

1531 

592 

1957 

2308 

3203 

13416 

400 
1380 
222S 
2148 
3881 
6234 
6833 
4726 

307 



62546 



45 

4817 

687 

351 

666 

1244 

1246 

6171 



557 

923 

1140 

1SS9 

2588 

3262 

2257 

135 



26978 



39 
4534 

497 

241 

687 

1154 

1294 

4994 



472 

969 

799 

1230 

2466 

3136 

2232 

150 



24894 



31 
1849 

347 



604 



663 

3251 

400 

351 

333 

209 

762 

1180 

435 

237 

22 



10674 






< 



o 

& 

< 
a 
» 

o 



68 

6422 

1015 

408 

941 

1218 

1653 

S04S 

232 

934 

1271 

1081 

2778 

3221 

2476 

1660 

84 



ID 

u 

A it 

•e < 
& a 



33507 



47 

4778 

516 

184 

1016 

1180 

1550 

5371 

168 

446 

954 

1067 

1103 

3013 

4357 

3066 

223 



29039 



72 

6205 

930 

349 

1084 

1304 

2227 

7630 

210 

8S3 

1369 

1285 

1870 





2425 

165 



28003 



43 
4995 

601 

243 

873 

1094 

976 

5786 

190 

492 

856 

863 

2011 

6234 

6833 

2301 

152 



34643 





138 

5 

8 

64 

54 

948 

6163 

130 

298 

331 

1024 

2149 

2027 

982 

34 

1 



14326 



5 

688 
118 

30 
123 
111 
191 
763 

18 

53 
104 

52 
105 
282 
179 

84 
1 



2907 



1571 



1571 



100 

9 

1511 

595 

65 

19 

16 

8 

144 

S9 

206 

107 

156 

66 

606 

169 

1 



88 

2 

21 

7 

7 

2 

31 

10 

109 

49 

30 

19 

96 

58 

169 

102 



3354 
1281 



35 
2 

631 

264 

2G 

8 

6 

4 

51 

17 

102 

S2 

55 

26 

239 

SI 





31 



9 

2 

I 



9 

3 

39 

17 

10 

8 

48 

29 

74 

41 



41 

3 

615 

197 

24 

7 

10 

4 

55 

24 

104 

55 

70 

30 

220 

58 





31 

1 

8 

3 

6 

2 

12 

3 

36 

15 

14 

7 

45 

27 

78 

S4 



136(1 1360 
554', 490 



a 
z 

H 



24 

4 

265 

134 

16 
4 



38 

IB 



31 

10 
146 

30 
1 


26 
1 
4 
2 



10 
4 

34 

17 
6 
4 
2 
2 

17 
7 



o 

X 
> 

S 

>< 

s 

o 

> 



619 
237 



Autopsies in red. 



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE RECORD LIBRARY 
June 30, 1939 to July 1, 1S40 



DEATHS: 

Due to Cardiovascular dis 
ease 

Due to Malignancy 

Due to Tuberculosis 

Due to Renal disease. . . . 
Due to Poison, accidents, 

and violence 

White___ 

Colored 

Male.. 

Female. ._. 

Still Borns 



156 
319 
309 

187 

236 
1572 

5Z0 
1782 

761 
1071 

742 
1383 

539 

273 






64 
133 
13S 

81 

77 
590 
187 
773 
303 
802 
284 
567 
206 



57 
123 
IGl 

67 

95 
C54 
233 
712 
321 
fe32 
338 
.534 
216 






3S 

63 
13 
39 

64 
322 
100 
297 
137 
337 
120 
282 
117 



s 



74 

100 

167 

76 

133 



82 

159 
142 
108 

103 



178 
200 

too 

145 



70 
141 
109 

87 

91 



2 

O 

gs 

a 

B. 
O 



a 

O 
U 

a 



p a 



ST. 

u 



V. 

a; M 



ts 

O 
W 
-i 

O 

O 
O 

a 

I 



Respectfully, 

Elizabeth B. Gre&nwjlld, 

Record Librarian 



104 



CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



REPORT OF STATISTICAL DEPARTMENT— Continued 

TABLE or ADMISSIONS, DISCHARGES AND DEATHS 

(Se« Report of Previous Years In Annual Repiort July 1, 1936 to 
June 30, 1937— Page 93i 



TBAE 


BEMAINI.VO 








RBUAINING 


TO JtlNE 


BEGIKNINO 


ADMITTKD 


DISCBABOED 


DIED 


AT CLOSE 


30th 


OF TEAE 








OF YEAR 


1035-36 


2,837 


70.504 


66,563 


3,590 


3,188 
Error 518 


1936-37 


3.188 


58,030 


55,579 


3,2.30 


2.309 


1937-38 


1,791 


52.863 


49,473 


3,063 


1,925 


1938-39 


1,925 


58,899 


,55,785 


3,105 


1.914 


1939-40 


1.914 


63,852 


60,000 


3,355 


2,411 




Student Nurses' Dining-Room and Cafeteria — Nurses' Home. 



SURGERY AND ACCIDENT 



lOS 



REPORT OF DEPARTMENT OR SURGERY 
AND ACCIDENT DEPARTMENT 

July 1, 1939 to June 30, 1940 



STAFF 

Sister Paula, R. N., 

Director 



Sister Carlos, R. N., 
Supervisor 

Jeanette Fontan, R. N., 

Assistant Supervisor 

MAUn BowEN, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Throat Room 

Grace Graiton, R, N., 
Head Nurse, Crystoscopic Room 

LORENA Sentilles, R. N. 
Head Nurse, Eye Room 

AC\'ES TiTARO, R. N, 

Head Nurse, Operating Room 

IjAura Green, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Operating Room 

AucE Maloy, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Operating Room 



Sister Patrice, R. N., 
Supervisor 

OUVE Claussen, R. N., 
Assistant Supervisor 

VliiGINIA Rbhage, R. N., 

Assistant Supervisor Accident Room 

Dolores Toorean, R. N., 
!iead Nurse, Broncboscopic Room 

Bebnadette Ernst, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Plaster Room 

Hilda Isenberg, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Operating Room 

IVA Mae L4MBERT, R, N„ 
Head Nurse, Operating Room 

Rosa Macias, R. N., 
Head Nurse, Operating Room 



MEDICAL SECRETARIES 



Amanda Caire 
Adrienne Moody 



Alice Swigakt 

KtHEL OUfFY 



The Department of Anesthesia is reporting on all anesthetics admia- 
istered. 



106 CHABITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

We wish to present the annual report of the Operating Rooms for the 
fiscal year beginning July 1, 1039 and ending June 30, 1940. 

It is with deep sense of gratification and satisfaction that we view our 
transition from the congested Delgatlo Building into the spacious accommo- 
dations of the operating rooms on the twelfth floor of the new hospital. 

From the standpoint of location, modem conveniences and general 
set-up, we feel that our department is an ideal one; this, however, is inade- 
quate compensation for the perplexing problem of the understaffing of our 
nursing personnel which is noticeably crippling our efficiency. This fact 
coupled with that of insufficient equipment, makes it impossible to render 
the type of service that our Doctors expect of us. 

Despite our disabilities, much has been accomplished, however, and we 
wish to express sincere gratitude to the Director of the Hospital and his 
two assistants who have offered their kind assistance in solving our many 
problems; to the Board of Administrators and to our Visiting, Resident and 
Interne Staffs for their generous service and excellent cooperation; and, to 
the Charity Hospital GuQd and Blue Bird Society for their untiring and 
valuable services. 

Respectfully submitted. 
SISTER PAULA, R. N., 
Director 



OPERATIONS, ACCIDENTS, ETC. 



107 



OPERATIONS 



MOSTB 



July 

August 

SeiJletnber^. 

October 

November., 
Dccembo".. 

January 

February — 

March 

April 

May 

June 



OPEBATINO 
BOOU 



TOTAI,- 



,636 
,373 
.488 
,47.5 
,429 
,2^8 
,271 
,048 
,690 
,760 
,842 
,817 



18,073 



ACCIDENT 
ROOM 



5,320 

5,139 
4,609 
4,446 
3,640 
3,997 
3,785 
3,670 
4,027 
3,890 
4,242 
4,730 



SI, 495 



CYSTOBCOPIC 
ROOM 



289 
359 
303 
223 
175 
169 
211 

22;j 

273 
277 
312 
296 



3,110 



MoMTH 



July.---.. 

August 

September.. 

October 

November. . 
pecember. . 
January- . _ . 
I-Tcbruary. _, 

March 

April 

May 

June 



Total 



EYE 

BOOM 

118 

96 

117 

102 
78 
96 
121 
103 
128 
143 
140 
150 

1,392 



EAB, NOSE, 

THROAT 

BOOM 

199 
251 

200 
154 
153 
159 
145 
147 
204 
20S 
345 
381 

2,606 



PLASTER 
ROOM 

348 
412 

397 
369 
345 
350 
325 
373 
200 
236 
217 
231 

3,863 



108 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1939-]940 

ANNUAL REPORT 

of 

Various Cates 

in 

ACCIDENT BOOK 

from 

July 1939-June1S40 

Rat Bites. _ 43 

Train Accidents I1II"IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1 32 

Motor Car Accidents "11^1111. "'""ri"!!"-!"! 2,790 

Street Car and Bus Accidents ,1~.'.1'.V."Z'.""1J1.1 117 

Guns and Pistols 323 

Fights V.llV.'. '. 1 242 

Pa"s r 7,663 

Cits 6,712 

DogBitea _ _ 2.053 

Minor Injuries or Contusions.. ., 10,117 

Obstetrics and Abortions " 1,847 

Boils, Abscesses and Carhundes. ..y////..., I', III ^illlll'.."".! 2,047 

G. U. Cases — Traumatic ..l.ll.lZllll 125 

G. U. Cases — Not Traumatic I.I 440 

Snake Bites . 12 

Bicycle Accidents ...ll.lll I III 186 

Burns _ . I "I II. I 1,031 

Dentistry-Alveolar Abscesses and Infections 1,016 

Infections ^ 3,921 

Medical _ IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 3!926 

Accidents Swimming-Diving-Drowned Cases :--- -. 50 

Blows — Causes not given 796 

Surgical— Hernias- Appendectomy, etc I 711 

Infections 25 

Eye— Not Traumatic IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 179 

Ear— Not Traumatic I . 613 

Insect Bites I. IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII II- 294 

Causes of Injury Not Stated 2,447 

Infectious Ulcers . 9 

Transfers IIIIIIIIIII IIIIIIIIIII 187 

Heat Exhuastions 4 

Fractures Not Due to Falls II IIIII.I 372 

Accidents on Street Cars, etc 

TOTAL „ 51,335 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 106 



REPORT OF THE MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 
DEPARTMENT 

To the Board of Administrators and Dr. Roy Wright, Director 
The vState of Louisiana Charity Hospital 
New Orleans. 

Gentlemen: 

Herewith is presented the Annual Report of the Medical Social Service 
Departtneiit from June 30, 1939, to July 1, 1940. 

Introduction 

An annual report not only reviews the work of the department for the 
year, but evaluates it and points out certain objectives which in the future 
it hopes to c;irr>- out. However, in the field of social work it is often diffi- 
cult to interpret to the public c.xactly what the functions of a social worker 
are because the services offered to the people who need them are often so 
intanfflble that it make.ii interpretation difficult. The social worker's knowl- 
edge and skill is effective only so far as the patients uoderstiiii<l how to use 
it, and therefore, the social worker must find ways of intcrjireling those 
skills so that the patient will understand and wiinl them. It is this compre- 
hension of the human and psychological nature of ser\'ice, the conviction 
that its value and effectiveness depend upon the way it Is offered ond the 
^ny it is taken, that places upon the individual staff worker the responsi- 
bility for a high professional competence. This means also that all staff 
workers must work together within the department antl with physicians and 
other social agencies to demonstrate how the .service they can offer can 
benefit individual clients. Therefore, this annual report represents the 
composite picture of the work of each individual social worker as it relates 
to the sen-ice they perform for the patient, and the effectiveness of the 
department and the hospital to the community. 

On July 24, the Social Service Department moved into the new hospital. 
The clinics moved in in .August, followed one by one by other departments 
go that by January all the departments and wards were under one root. 
However, because of an inadequate i>ntigct the whole hospital is not operat- 
ing to its full capacity, and the chnics are still runniiiK three days a week 
for colored and three for white. This means that it is still impossible to 
predict exactly the amount of personnel necessary to mn the department 
effectively, or to know what demands will be made upon the social workers. 
/^S it is, there has been cjuite a drastic turnover in the .Social .Service Dopart- 
ment this year and four social workers and two stenographers who left could 
not be replaced so that this department, as well as many other departments 
in the ho.spilal. has been handicapped in its work. Nevertheless, it is a 
source of great satisfaction that the new hospital so long anticipated is com- 
pleted and that once more all departments arc on the ho.spital gnnnids. 

Brief statement of the feneral situation 
In order to understand the rcsponsihility of the .Sot-ial Service Depart- 
jncnt it should be home in mind that Charity Hospital, which i.s a stnte 
institution free to aU sick and indigent residents of Louisiana, is used by 
the Tolanc and Louisiana State University Medical Schools for leaching 
purposes. There is also an independent unit of doctors. The lied capacity 
is 3,330 (half for colored and half for white) and the clinic attendance 
averages 2,000 daily. 



110 CHARITY HOSPITAi:^1939.194 

Functions of the Social Service Department at Charity Hospital 

The basis of medical social service is the medical need of the patient — a 
need which may be aggravated by social conditions and which may require 
social as well as medical treatment. The medical social worker seeks to 
obtain and apply such understanding of the patient, as will enable the 
mstitution, the physician and other social agencies concerned to comprehend 
and treat his dlaess more effectively and, in turn, to make the patient 
understand those thmgs which he needs to know in order if possible to be 
restored to health The social worker serves in a liason relationship between 
the doctor and the patient. She also serves in a iiason capacity between 
the hospital, the community, and the social agencies throughout the city 
and the state. It is essential for the department to keep informed and to 
take an active part m the social planning and legislation, as praclicallv no 
social agency poiicy m the state can fail to effect Charity Hospital in some 
way because of Its statewide program. Therefore, attendance at meetings 
of the Council of iwcial Agencies and other social agencies is important from 
the standpoint of policy development and of promoting wider health inter- 
ests and understanding. 

The department accepts eases on ail patients who are actively under 
treatment on the wards or attending clinics, and patients may be 'referred 
oy members of the hospital staff, the patient himself, or outside agencies 
or interested individuals. The social workers are assigned to the various 
warns aud clmics so that aU divisions of the hospital are covered. Written 
records are kept on all cases in the department, although in the majority of 
cooperative cases with other social agencies no running history is kept as 
tue letters contain the necessary information. The case records are similar to 
progress notes and medical histories found in hospital charts and are neces- 
sary because of the compUcated nature of the ca.ses which necessitate a 
written history of the progress in social planning and medical care. Beror« 
any diagnosis is given out it is necessary to have the written consent of the 
doctor ^^'^'^^^ "■*"*" *''* request is made l>y another medical agency or 

tl*"?!^"??^ workers are on call and when practicable make ward rounds 
ana jiold clinic consultations with the medical staff. Because Charity Hos- 
pitals assumes the major responsibility to the medically indigent of the state 
oi ivouisiana a large number of the patients arc either employed on the 
worfcs J^rojects Administration or receiving relief from the Department of 
i-ubhc Welfare. An indication of the size of the problem is shown by the 
lact that in New Orleans alone one fourth of the total population of the 
city are on relief while over one third live in families having incomes of 
less than tl.OOO a year. 

Before any plan can be made for a patient, it is necessar>' to know the 
diagnosis, the nature of his recommended treatment, and the probable length 
of his convalescence. When patients are referred by the social agencies the 
social worker attempts to give the doi^tor. through information given her by 
the agency, a picture of the patient as an individual; she then secures from 
the doctor recommendations for treatment, diet, medication and activity 
bmitation. which she in turn explains to the social agency referring the 
patient. She also interprets to the patient and his family what the doctor 
says about his condition and the treatment that is necessary. 

While the department has no relief fund it is able to plan for special 
care and medication through arrangements with relief agencies or interested 
individuals. It is able to arrange for temponiry tree placement of out-of- 
town white patients while they are completing clinic treatment or undergoing 
special tests. There are no free shelter homes for colored patients. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 111 

While the department does not limit its services to any ouc field (med- 
ical, pediatrics, tuberculosis, orthopedics, etc.) it ivas planned to have h few 
specialized services where the Case loa'tj was more or less protected, but 
because of tlie number of workers in comparison to the size of the hospital 
it has been impassible to keep the case loads, even on a few of the servioes 
down to a desirable level. No worker with a case load of from UK) to 200 
cases can possibly do very intensive case work with detailed rccordinB. 
Therefore emphasis has been placed on developing good worker-doctor rela- 
tionship, the early recognition of medical social problems, and the develop- 
ment of skill in the interpretation of medical data to the patient and to 
other social agencies both by letter and conferences. 

Qualifications of Workers 

The Social Service Department meets the requirements for mcmbcrslii]> 
in the Amerieal .Association of Medical Social Workers. This means that il 
must be staffed by professionally trained medical social workers. Of (he 21 
social workers now oa the staff, 17 have Masters' degrees in medical social 
work and the remaining have had either one or two years graduate work 
in accredited schools of social work. 

Description of Services 

In order to describe the type of service rendered a brief summary of 
each worker's services for one month during the year folJows; 

White Obstetrics and Gynecoiogr (Case Load 99) 

The worker on white obstetrics and gynecology spends much of her time 
on the obstetrical service. She gets most of her referrals from the mrdical 
Staff for placemesit for medical reasons such as toxemia, heart ccnutiiions. 
venereal conditions, until term. .After delivery these patient.s are placed iu 
shelter homes, pending successful working out of a plan. .As most of these 
cases are with unmarried mothers, it requires intensive care and iv great 
deal of time both medically and socially. The princii)ai handicaps arc the 
lack of convalescent care and a well defined child welfare program in the 
community and iti the state. 

Wlute Male Medical Wards and Clinics (Case Load 839) 

The chief concern of the worker on the while male medical wards is 
the number of chromes who must be removed from ihe wards speedily. 
Because there are so few resources for chronics (Orleans is the only parish 
in the state that has custodial homes for thera and there are always waiting 
lists to these homes) this is a time consuming job which often .shows too 
little result for the hours spent in trying to make plans for these patients. 
In the clinics, however, the Imlk of the work is examination (or employa- 
bility, following agcticy cases, and sending Inboratorj- reports to agencies on 
applicants to the Child Guidance Center and Children's Homes, The re- 
ferrals from the doctors are for the most part due to need for shelter care, 
for more adequate relief for patients, and for obtaining prescription.^ for 
which the patients are not able to pay. 

White and Colored Clinics 2 workers and 1 Supervisor (Case Load 1362) 

The workers in the white and colored clinics cover the majority of the 
services in the clinic. The doctors refer cases because the success of the 
niedical work often depends upon financial assistance in seciirinR drugs, ap- 
pliances and adequate diets. A great deal of time is spent in explaining and 
ffiving to patients an niiderstasidiug of what seems to them confusing and 
forbidding clinic procedures. For example, one patient refused an electro- 



112 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 



cardiogram because he did not know what it was. After it was explained 
he readily consentctl to have this done. The bulk of the work is with coop- 
erative cases from the social aceiicics and much of the work is dotic by 
correspondence and case conferences. The question of empIoyabiUty. while 
annoying to the doctor because of the crowded clinics, is important as the 
decision as to whether a patient is eligilile for relief hinsi'S on the medical 
report. If he is well he is employable atid is rtf erred to the Works Pro- 
jects Administration. If he is disabled the case is referred to the Depart- 
ment of Public Welfare for consideration. 

Colored Male and Female Medical Wards (Case Load 148) 

The largest perceulage of cases referred to the worker on the colored 
male and feniale medical wards arc heart cases needing bed rest at home, 
cases admitted to Charity Hospital, usually aged, not in need of hospitaliza- 
tion aud in most cases starved, and completely paralyzed patients referred 
for placement because no relatives are willing or able to care for them in 
their homes. Also a great number of patients are admitted whose names are 
frequently incorrect and for whom there is no adtlress or even the name of 
the nearest relative or friead. With extremely limited resources for the col- 
ored and because of the large pcndins load on the Department of Public 
Welfare lists, this service presents utiusual complications. 

Neurological Service (Case Load 239) 

The neurological and psychiatric service comprises the wards and clinks 
for white ami colored males and females. The chief problems of the worker 
on this service are the homeless traasients with chronic neurological condi- 
tions who have not established a residence anywhere, aud local patients for 
whom commitments from the Coroner's office must be obtained. I'seless 
hours are spent in waiting for the Coroner as he keeps irregular office hours. 
It is to be hoped that the Charity Hospititl can make some arrangement 
whereby transfer to the City Hospital for Mental Diseases can be made 
without it being necessary for the social worker to spend so much time away 
from her regular duties. 

Colored Tuberculosis (Case Load 212) 

Examination of tuberculosis contacts, making provision for the care of 
the single men aud women when discharged from the wards, making pro- 
vision for those not admitted (only cases that can benefit from medical 
therapy are admitted, and there are many colored tuberculous patients in 
the tar advanced stages who cannot be admitted* and arranging for relief 
for these families, are the major responsibilities of the worker on the colored 
tuberculosis .service. Community provision for Sanitorium care for colored 
tuberculous patients, which is necessary to keep them from rc-infecliiiK 
members of their own race and their white employers, and more adequate 
public relief for these patients are primary community needs. 

WUte Male and Female Surgical, Geni to- Urinary. Ear, Nose and 
Throat Wards (Case Load 144) 

On the white male and female surgical, genito-urinary, and ear, nose and 
throat services the chief problems are providing shelter care for non-resi- 
dents, arranging convalescent care for patients no longer needing hospital 
care and placing temporarily or permanently chronically ill or aged indi- 
viduals. The limitations are the lack of shelter homes and the fact that the 
one convalescent home available in New Orleans, because of its small per- 
sonnel, requires that all patients sent to them tnust be ambulatory. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 113 

Salvarsao Clinic (Case Load 811) 

The worker in the Salvarsan Ctinic has but little time except (or an 
administrative job, (Until January ID-lt) an additional worker was assigned 
to handle selected cases in which intensive and highly iudividualixvd ser- 
vice was necessary. The cases selected were those in which it was believed 
that definite results could be obtaiued, Thifi worker also assisted iu the 
cUnic.) The Works Projects Administration has assigned four clerical work- 
ers to the social service worker and the cliiiic itself provides a nurse to do 
the follow-up work. (The nurse in this chnic as well as the eye, tuljcrculosis 
and tumor clinics formerly were in the Social Service Department but have 
now been taken over by the Out-Patient Clinic) Since the chief obstacles 
for treatment is usually the patient's own ignorance in regard to the disease 
and its possible consequences, emphasis is placed upon making him under 
stand his condition and need for treatment. This iiiteq>retation is done by 
direct contact with the patient (all new patients are interviewed routinely i 
and also through other social agencies in the community who are interested 
iu the patient. During one month the worker bad 1188 interviews with 
patients in which the main focus was on securing regular clinic attetidancc 
through a proper understanding uf its iniporlaiice. She also arTanged tor 
the examination of 103 contacts. Another important part of this worker's 
job is with the cooperative case for the social agencies in the community 
Reports on 205 patients were sent during this month as the agencies, iu order 
to plan intelligently and constructively for the patient needs, must know 
vi^hat his physical condition is. Arrangements were also made for the con- 
tinuation of treatment for 55 patients not living in New Orleans. The Sal- 
varsan Clinic which treats both the colored and white patients has a 
monthly attendance of about 9,78-1 patients. Obviously with the siitc of the 
clinic in relation to its suiall personnel many problems go untouched. 

Under the auspices of the Department of Public Welfare a night Sal- 
varsan Clinic was held two nights a week, one night for colored and one 
night for white patients, for about a year. Because of lock of funds this 
worthwhile project was closed. Two social workers had becu assigned t<i 
the clinic. The closing of this clinic was a distinct loss to the comraiinity 
in view of the fact that the patients were those individuals who worked, 
and by attendance in this ebnic lost no hours from their job. At the present 
time those patients who cannot leave their employment, or afford the service 
of a private physician, are receiving no treatment. 

Diabetic Service (Case Load 193) 

The worker on the Diabetic Service is responsible for all referrals of 
diagnosed diabetic patients, white and colored, male and female, where some 
plan is necessary to enable the patients to secure insulin, diet, home care 
and follow-up treatment and adjustment in home situations. Besides the 
ward patients there is a diabetic clinic which meets twice a week. Because 
it is frequently necessary for these patients to change to a different type of 
work, social agencies interested in tliein must be kept informed of the 
patient's medical condition; therefore, whenever the routine of a diabetic 
patient is changed in the clinic the worker sends a report to the social 
agency. 

White Female Medical CUnic and Words, and Colored Male and 
Female Surgical Wards (Case Load 171) 

Much of the clinic work on the while female medical clinic and wards 
and colored male and female surgical wards involves securing reports for 
social agencies in the community interested in the patients. While the great 
volume of work is for the agencies, these agencie.s are the source of getting 



114 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1939-1940 

aid for the patient when special recommendations are made. The doctors 
refer many patients for financial aid, without which they would l}c unable 
to carry out his recommendations. The probtem on the female medtc:U wards 
is the large number of old women with chronic heart disease, with no home 
or relatives who are willing to take them. The problem o( the colored 
patient is the lack of community resources and the limited finances in the 
homes of these patients. The outstanding problem in both colored and 
white is the non-resident where, because there are so few resources available 
in the community to this type of patient, it is almost impossible to get 
patients off the wards quickly. 

White Pediatrics and Contagious (Case Load 106) 

The problem on the white pediatrics and contagious units are varied, 
r'remalures, glandular disturbances, cardiacs, behavior problems, severe mal- 
nutrition, severe dietary deficiency diseases, and babies who cannot tolerate 
simple milk are some of the diagnoses encountered. Inadequate income and 
lack of understandmg on the part of the mother are oftentimes the cause 
of these condiuons. This entails on the part of the social worker investiga- 
tion of home conditions and constant interpretation of the doctor's recom- 
mendations for treatment. It is also necessary to enlist the services of the 
L.bM Welfare Association and the Child Guidance Center. Shelter, food and 
return transportation for out-of-town parents who !>ring their babies in to 
tbe Hospital are frequently needed, and it is often necessary to arrange con- 
vajescent care tor children whose own homes cannot provide such care— 
loster domes are limited in number Oa the Contagious Unit many of the 
reterrals are emergencies which require many hours of work to arrange for 
saelter and transportation in the case of penniless transients. This year 
there have Ijeen a number of cases of leprosy. Interpretation of the disease 
to the patient and his family, making plans for their removal to CarviUe, 
the \j. b. Leprosarium, and examination of contacts are among the duties 
of the social worker. 

Eye Service (Ca^e Load 202) 
In order for a patient to derive the most benefit from examination and 
treatment and advice given him by the doctor in the eye clinic it is essen- 
tial that he understand something of his condition and the importance of 
follow-up recommendations. Besides the clinic which meets daily (three 
times a week for white and three times a week for colored) this worker has 
charge pf all the eye cases on the wards, both male and female and colored 
and white. Since 1932, when the National Society for the Prevention of 
Blindness used Charity Hospital as one of its demonstraUon centers and 
for three years paid part of the salary- of a specially trained eye social 
worker, the department has not been without a worker with this special 
training. However, in December 1939 the State Department of Public 
Welfare needed a worker for the Aid to Needy Blind cases which come 
under the Social Security Act and the worker, who had been doing this 
work, together with her work in the Social Service Department, was trans- 
ferted to the State Department, Because the state examining ophthalmolo- 
gist is stationed in New Orleans, the worker remains in Charity Hospital 
and thus is able to supervise the new worker who has replaced her on the 
eye service. This service calls for special training and it is now hoped to 
send the newly assigned worker to St. Louis for a three months course 
next autumn. 

Dibert (Wliite Tuberculosis) (Case Load 280> 

The two workers in the Dibert and the tuberculosis clinic, both on the 
Ttllane and Louisiana State University services have had the responsibility 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE IIB 

of anunging for examination of contacts, planning with the patient for care 
of dependents, explaining to the fainUy the diagnosis and the need for 
bospitaiization, and arranging for care of patients outside the hospital when 
discharged. The same workers continue planning with the puticnt after dis- 
charge. They help carr>' out the doctor's recommendations, keep social 
agencies, who are responsible for financial aid to the patients infnrmed of 
the patient's progress or regression, and assist with re-emptoymeut plans 
when the patient is able to work. The chief problem confrotUing these 
workers is plamiing for patients ready for discharge. The diagnosis of 
tuberculosis closes the door of convalescent homes and boarding homes and 
often the family home from which the patient came. As the Dihert only 
admits patients needing active treatment and who have a good prognosis, 
the problem of what to do with the far advanced cases is equally serious 
with the white patient as it is with the colored cases and the number of 
beds in the state for such cases is woefully small. 

Orthopedic Service (Case Load 359) 

The two workers on the orthopedic and fracture service tor colored 
and white male and female in the clinics and wards find these typical prob- 
lems: Bed care for patients after discharge, more adequate relief both in 
Jsfew Orleans and throughout the state; securing transportation to anil from 
the clinics and obtaining shoe corrections, braces et cetera. Relative to the 
last problem, while some assistance is received from the Louisiana Society 
for Crippled Children, the State Crippled Cbildren'.s Division of the Social 
Security program, (both organizations help only patients under 211 and 
from funds derived from President Roosevelt's Birthday Ball for poliomye- 
litis cases, there are still a large group who cantiot receive assistance from 
these sources. This hampers the workers' efficiency in helping these patients 
to carry out the long time treatment plan.';. Inability to secure appliances 
frequently hinders the patient's return to employment. 

Colored Obstetrics, Pediatrics and Gynecology (Case Load 176) 

The worker on the colored obstetric, pediatrics and gynecology finds 
that pediatrics occupies the larger share of her work. The doctors are 
anxious for pertinent social information and often gauge the length of the 
patient's hospital stay accordingly. Clinic patients have to be followed over 
a long period of time when the diagnosis is serious, with constant interpre- 
tation to parents and to social agencies of the patient's medical necd.<j. The 
Department of Public Welfare in Orleans Parish has been very under- 
Standing in their help and in the cases of malnutrition there have been many 
successful results. .Arranging for antitithie therapy for patients from par- 
ishes where there are no health units, is a time consuming but worthwhile 
undertaking. The obstetrical and gj'necological services present the problem 
of relief and the need for interpretation of the doctor's recommendatiotis 
that, if these patients return to work too soon, their conditions may become 
chronic. It is sometimes difficult to arrange for further medical care for 
those patients returning to the parishes because medical care and proper 
follow-up may not be available. Social agencies in these parishes can often 
help by following the recommendation of the Charity Hospital doctors sent 
them through the Social Service Department. 

Tumor Service (Case Load 176) 

While the worker on this service accepts cases of malignancy from all 
the wards and clinics (colored and white, male and female) she is solely 
responsible for the patients known to the Radium and Deep K-Ray Therapy 
pepartments. Her most outstanding problem is that of arranging terminal 



116 CHARITY HOSPITAL-1939-1940 

care. While there is a sad lack of facilities and resources throughout the 
state for the care of the chronically ill persons there is a worse one for 
those patients requiring speci:*! nursing tare and narcotics. If re-admission 
is to be avoided care must lie taken in not only interpreting the patient's 
needs Itut in arranging tor nursing care and determining how narcotics can 
be obtained if they are needed. It is not ea.sy (or the social agencies, nor 
the families of those patients with far advanced carcinoma for whom farther 
care in the hospital is not indicated, to understand why they should be 
returned home. Until the reason back of the doctor's action is carefully 
interprctcd, thereby alleviating the aiitaKOuism of the family group, no plan 
for the patient's care outside the hospital can be arranged. There are a 
great number of patients who cannot be discharged as there is absolutely 
no place for them to go. The worker also has the respotisibility of arrang- 
ing temporary placement for out of town patients who are attending the 
clmic or for those who report daily to the Radiology Department for 
treatment. 

Transportation Worker and Chauffeur 

Since patiejits so frequently come to Charity Hospital without money 
lor "■"iim [are. the hospital has been put to great expense in the past keep- 
ing these patients on the wards for long periods after discharge. The func- 
uon o the transportation worker is to arrange for transportation for aU 
out-ot-lown patienis so that, insofar as is possible, no patient will be held 
on tne wards after discharge. A total of approximately 54fi interviews are 
made a month to learn whether patients have money for return fare. All 
cases, upon which there is a social problem, are referred by the transporta- 
tion worker to the social worker. 

The chauffeur goes regularly evcrv moniiug to one ticket office to 
have the chanty rate tickets o.k.'d by the general passenger agent and then 
to the city ticket office to purchase the tickets. This takes one and one 
tjuarter hours. The same procedure is followed in the afternoon, only to 
different railroads. He then takes patients to the trains, back and forth 
to special clinics, to shelter homes, et cetera. He makes an average of 319 
tnps a month. Abont 17S charity rate tickets are purchased a month, 
amounting to 8278.81, all paid by agencies and patients. 

Works Projects Administration Worker 

The State Department of I»ublic Welfare pays the salary of one worker 
who handles all local Works Projects Administration reports concerning 
employability of patients. If these patients are employable they are not 
eligible for relief from the Department of Public Welfare and. therefore, 
are referred to the Works Projects Administration, On the other hand, if 
they become unemployable they are cut oft from the Works Projects 
Administration payroll and sent ro the Department of Public Welfare. A 
typical month's work was steering 2,'>6 Works Projects Administration 
patients through the clinic of which 32 were liospitaliascd. 20^ reports were 
sent in to the Works Projects Administration. G3 slips were issued certify- 
ing to hospital treatment, so that the employee's time could be made tip. 
7.5 Salvarsan attendance cards were given and 1300 patients were interviewed. 

Admit ting Room 

The end of January, at the request of the Director of the hospital, the 
supervisor in charge of the Intake De.sk was transferred to the Admitting 
Room. (The Intake Desk is now handled by one of the stenographers and 
three National Youth Administration Workers). The object of placing the 
worker in the Admitting Room wa& to take care of any problems arising 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 117 

among those patients whom the admitting doctors do not consider hospital 
cases. She has cut down hospital admissions by making plans for the 
patients oa the outside and has materially aided the admitting doctors. 
This service will perhaps be the forerunner of social-admitting in Charity 
Hospital. It has been a need that has existed for years, a.s heretofore, any 
so called .■sick indigent resident of the stuti; who applied for admi.>isio!i was 
accepted. 

Education 

The department participates in the teaching of the Louisiana State 
University Medical .School senior medical students. The Director fjives a 
course of lectures the second semester and during the entire school year the 
students, divided into groups of four, for a period of eight weeks each, come 
10 the department for two hours a week. Nine of the more experienced 
workers help in this project and each worker has two students assigned 
to her. 

The department is used by the Tulane Univereity School of Social Work 
as one of its teaching centers for field work and while six of the students 
are under the supervision of an instructor from Tulane, four students, (two 
each), are under the supervision of the departnicnt supervisors. This is 
particularly valuable to the supervisors and the department as it is definite- 
ly a means of keeping ol^reast of the newer trends in medical social practice. 

One of the supervisors participates in the teaching program of the 
Charity Hospital School of Nursing and the results have been noticeable in 
that the nurses' social outlook has broadened, and her interest in the patient 
as an individual, and not just a hospital case, has deepened. 

Commtuity Activities 

The department also participates in the social programs in the com- 
muoity and state, thereby promoting wider health interests and initiating 
iieW health activities in the health field. Papers have been given by the 
pirector and various staff members al the Council of Social Agencies, the 
American Association of Social Workers, the Gulf District of the American 
Association of Medical Social Workers, and the State Conference of Social 
■Vifelfare. One of the workers, together with a doctor from the pediatrics 
service, gave a series of lectures to the local Department of Public Welfare, 
the doctor presenting the medical side and the social worker explaining the 
medical social aspects of diseases common to children. 

Statistical Statement 

The number of cases handled in the Social Service Department during 
the year were . _ .. 59,9S2 

Of this total of 59,982 cases: 

New referrals S,647 

Cases already known to the Department 

(old and recurrent) ,')1,33;> 

Total .■i<):9S2 

Referred by Doctors and Hospital Staff L':!,.')S)) 

Referred by social agencies .'W.ilSO 

Referred by patient group — _»„__- 1,322 

Total o{>,as2 

New eases from Orleans Parish ,5,02" 
New cases from other parishes 

(inclusive of intra-state transients) 3,47.'i 
New cases outside the state 

(inclusive of interstate transients! __ 145 

Total 8.647 



118 CHARITY HOSPITAI^1939-1940 



Number of Home Visits made 

by staff workers 3,229 

Number of Contact Interviews made 

by staff workers 29,6S0 

Number of Office Interviews 

by staff workers 18,978 

Number of Clinic Interviews 

by staff workers . 22^1 

Number of Ward Interviews 

by staff workers , 20,893 

Number of letters written 36,865 

Number of telegrams sent 431 



131,637 



In accordance with the Transporlalioii Agreement financial inve.stigalioil 
of the patients was done before charity rate tickets were purchased. 

Number of charity rate tickets purt;hascd: 

Paid by patient and agencies 2,704— J4,. 550.00 

Pfud by Social Service Dept 28— 33.25 



Total 2,732—84,883.25 

Recommendations 

It is apparent from analyzing the workers services that certain commou 

problems stand out: 

1. The Admitting System of Charity Hospital should be im- 
proved. Provision should be made to provide more social workers 
and interviewers to interview all applicants found medically eligible 
for treatment in both wards and cHnics. More careful recording of 
names, addresses, and names of relatives should be made. 

2. A unit record system would facilitate getting needed medical 
mformation. 

3. A more adequate staff, and re-evaluation of program to 
conform to the new hospital requirements. 

The Social Service Department has too many demands made upon it for 
the size of the staff. To meet the needs a more adequate staff in the Social 
bervice Department should be provided. Dr, MacEachem in his book 
HospiUl Org^zation and Management" and the report of the Medical 
bocial Service Survey for New York recommends that the number of social 
workers for a department should be based upon the supposition that every 
patient admitted to the hospital is a potential social service case, and like- 
wise every five clinic visits should be so considered. This entity was termed 
a potential work unit and it was estimated that 3800 potential work units 
was the aimual maximum load per social worker which should not be 
exceeded, and 2,000 was a more desirable average. This would mean that 
for the fiscal year 1935-193C (which was before the building of the new 
hospitaJJ in which year there were 66,.t63 hospital admissions and 468,512 
clinic visits, a minimum of 56 or a maximum of 76 workers would be indi- 
cated. Compare this figure with the present staff of 24 workers! In the new 
hospital, not yet filled to its rapacity of 3,300 beds, the turnover for June 
1940 shows that 5,425 patients were discharged. This would indicate a 
greatly increased potential work unit over 1935>1936. 



MEDICAL SOCIAL SERVICE 119 

Replacements of workers who have left aiid are leaving has not so far 
been possible. In (irdcr to keep up standards in the department, and avoid 
superficial and ineffective work the staff must lie enlarged. The fact that 
since January there has been no intake secretar>' has been a serious handi' 
cap. It has been difficult during this interim of moving into the new hos- 
pital for the department to define satisfactorily its aims. A rc-evalualion 
of the program and an analysis of what it is practicable to do with available 
staff is definitely indicated in the coming year in view of the increasing 
demands of the new hospital. Changing programs in the state public welfare 
departments may mean corresponding adjustments in the Social Service 
Department. 

Handicaps due to Unmet Community Needs 

The effectiveness of a social service department in a public hospital 
the size of Charity Hospital, depends upon using the community resources 
iri both serving the patient, and, in providinp the doctor with the assistance 
he needs in carrying out the patients' medical and social treatment. The 
following handicaps illustrate some of the problems encountered by the 
Social Service Department. 

1. Insufficient Relief, The large number of pending applica- 
tions in the Department of Public Welfare and the limited relief 
grants seriously affect the medical needs of the patient. 

2. Problems inherent in handling parish cases through coire- 
spondence. Because of inaccessibility of patients' homes, the parish 
agencies are unable to do adequate medical toUow-up. 

3. The fact that Charity Hospital is regarded as a "dumping 
ground" for chronically il! people who are a problem to their com- 
munities, and not a hospital for the acutely ill, necessiitates con- 
tinued education throughout the state to change this concept. 

4. The need tor tuberculosis sanitoriums. The Charity Hos- 
pital only accepts early, hopeful cases of tuberculosis and there 
are not sufficient facilities in the state for the treatment of far 
advanced cases, 

5. T^ack of facilities for working with unmarried mothers. 

6. Lack of provision outside of Orleans Parish for the chron- 
ically ill. The waiting list in New Orleans where three homes, one 
for white and two for colored, arc provided is increasingly long. 

7. No shelter or free convalescent homes for care of colored 
patients. 

8. Inadequate Child Welfare care. The State Department of 
Public Welfare has not yet provided nearly enough facililies for the 
care of children and the private agencies cannot meet the need, 

9. Insufficient provi.<!ion (or free drugs. The Sickles Fund is 
inconveniently located requiring patients to walk long distances 
for drugs and the supply is limited. 

10. A visiting physician service in the homes of the patients. 
This would provide care for cardiac cases which have been ordered 
bed rest but need medical supervision and, therefore, have to come 
in to the clinic for it. It would also provide care for cancer and 



120 



CHARITY HOSPITAL^1939-1940 



other sericus conditions, and, therefore keep many of the patients 
from seeking re -ad mission to the hospital. 

Conclusion 

Gratitude is extended to the Illreclor of (ht Hospital for his unfailing 
cooperation and his continued interest and support. To the Board of Admin- 
istrators is extended the appreciation of the department. The Sisters of 
Charity have rendered invaluable assistance and the cooperation of the 
nursing and medical staffs has made possible much that has fieen accom- 
plished. Special acknowkdEmeni is tendered the State and Local Depart- 
ments of Public Welfare, the various social agencies in the city and state 
and to the volunteers who have given so much valuable personal service. 
Special commendation is due the mcmhers of the Snt-ial Rer^-ice staff, but 
for whose zeal and untiring efforts the accomplishments of the department 
would not have been possible. 

Respectfully submitted. 

BEATRICE HODGE, Director 
7-10-40 Medical Social Service Department 



Beatrice Hodge, 
Director 

LVDIA FjNr,EY, 

Assistant Director 
Lbola Dragii.v, 
Supervisor 



PERSONNEL 



Myea Richards 
Admitting Room 



Mabgi.'erite Parsons. 

Supervisoi- 
Sister Frances. 

Supervisor 

Louise MeveRj 

Chief Clinic Worker 
and Supervisor 



Maey Morris 
Enolia Archinahd 
loijise goetter 
Mattie C. McCartv 
Kitty Reii» 
Frances Shannon 

*PeABI, MA-i-ER 

Nei.ue Jackson 

EVAIXNA FORI> 

'Genevieve Wright 
Camilij: Park 
Margaret Miceli 



WORKERS 



*SuE Lisso 



*Bettv Ford 

*Mary Seago Brooke 

tANNA Harrison 

♦M.VRJOKIE NiCAtID 

*CoRiNNE Thomas 
Helen Cassidy 
Sylvia Rosenson 
Doris Culver 
MARifiAYijE Hopkins 
Louise Selung 
JuuETTE deFrances 
Isabel Ewing 



TRANSPORTATION CLERKS 
Charlotte Matthews Louis Morel 

SECRETARIES 

Katherine Chambers 

Audrey Marionneaux 

Care Roth 

*Luc;e Ameue Oijvier 
*Anne Flake 

*MARCAilET St. Cr-AIR 
*El-VIKA LEf-OKGNE 

Jane Uerndon 



Mary Qijealy 
Barbara Kessi£r 

•Janet Payne 
Anna Dell Thlac 

•EviB HuNieit 
Margaret Quealy 
Wallace McNabb 



• Itetigneil . 
tTranaf erred to D. P. W. 



PUBLIC WELFARE WORKERS 121 



STATE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE WORKERS 

Mary Sistrunk t Elaine Sorjonnen Lorainne Thomas 

VOLUNTEERS 

Miss Triste Bringier Miss Marie Gill 

Miss Olga D'Aquin Miss Jennie Casella 

Mrs. Margie Hart Myles Miss Lydla Schaumburc 

Mrs. Sudie Mylbs Mrs. Walter Gog 

Mias Barbara Vallas Mrs. George Janvier, Jr. 

Miss Vera Daniels Mrs. D, S. Stuart, Sr. 

Miss Isabel Phillips Miss Margaret Quealy 

Miss Wilhelmina McGovern Mrs. Waldo Francois 

Miss Regina Goosman Mrs. G. Grosnover 

Miss Doris White Miss Ethel Shack 

WORKS PROJECTS ADMINISTRATION WORKERS 

Alma Dupre Melba Fink 

Dorothea Smith Helen Wood 

NATIONAL YOUTH ADMINISTRATION WORKERS 
Isabel Phillips Regina Goosman Wilhelmina McGovern 



tRMwlled lo the loi'al HupuniiuMit nf Piihlle Welfare Ofrioe. 



122 CHARITY HOSPITAI^1939-194{l 

REPORT OF NURSING DEPARTMENT 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND TEACHING STAFF 

Director of Department Sistee Stanislaus, R. N., Sc. D. 

Assistant Director of Department-.... SiSTBR Mathilbe, M. A, 

Director of School of Nursing 

and Nursing Service ...SlSTER Henhietta, R. N., M, S. 

Associate Director of School of 

Nursing - .Sistek Sylvia, R. N., B. S. 

Associate Director, Nursing Service Sistik Urban, R. N., B. S. 

Assistant Directors: 

School of Nursing _ Marv E. Stuart, R. N., B. S. 

School of Nursing and Nursing 

Service Saide Salmeia, R. N., B. S. 

School of Nursing and Nursing 
Service „ Rowena Miller, R. N. 

Nursing Service in Charge of 

Subsidiary Workers „ WnxiE Mask. R, N., B. S. 

Director of Clinical Instruction Marouerite Paetknick, R.N., B. S. 

Assistant Director of Clinical 

Instruction . Gall Squires. R.N,, B. S, 

Assistant Director of Clinical 

Instruction LUTiE Cough, R. N.. B. S. 

Social Director and Instructor in 

Social Sciences .„ Mary E, GILIJ;^f, B. N., B. S. 

Instructor in Principles and 

Practice of Nursing... „.Cecilia Perbodin, R. N., B, Ed. 

Assistant Instructor in Principles 

and Practice of Nursing Margaret Ai-i.en. R.N. 

Assistant Instructor in Principles 

and Practice of Nursing Juanita Soweli., R.N, 

Supervisor, Nurses Residence „ Dorothea Armbbustbk, R. N. 

Acting Chief Anesthetist and Di- 
rector of School of Anesthesia ..Lillian Gebs, R. K. 

Chief Anesthetist in Obstetrical 

Anesthesia ...Mary E. Koenig, R. N, 

Chief Gas Therapist and Educa- 
tional Director in School of 
Anesthesia ...Esther Myers, B. N, 



NURSING DEPAKTMENT 123 

REPORT OF THE NURSING DEPARTMENT 

To the Board of Administrators and Doctor Roy W. Wright, Director 
Cbarity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans 

Gentlemen: 

The annual report of the Nursing Department for the fiscal year from 
July 1, 1639, to June 30, 1940, is herewith presented. 

The reorganization necessitated by the opening of the new hospitaJ 
has made this past fiscal year a memorable one. For the Nursing Depart- 
ment, entrance into the new building brought in its train increased respon- 
sibility in the organization of several new divisions designed to improve 
service on the hospital floors. The load already carried by the Department 
has likewise been made heavier by the increasing census which has followed 
the opening of the new Main Building. 

ORGANIZATION 

The Nursing Department is now functioning chiefly through three main 
divisions: the Nursing Service Division, which carries responsibility for the 
nursing care of palients. and which also includes the Central Service Depart- 
ment, the Sewing Room and the Central Linen Rooms, the Gas Therapy 
Department, and the Admission Bathrooms and Patients' Clothes Rooms; 
the School of Nursing, which is concerned with the instmclion of nurses, 
including the School of Anesthesia; and the Housekeeping Department, 
which was ori^anized upon our entrance into the new hospital, and which 
is charged with the cleaning in the hospital. 

NURSING SERVICE DIVISION 

The headquarters of thu Nursing Service Division are located on the 
fourth floor of the new Main Building adjoining the offices of the Director 
and Assistant Director of the Nursing Dcpartmeut. The centraliiation of 
the main offices of the Nursing Department has great advantage over the 
former separation of offices in different buildings. Space is siill inadequate, 
however, for all members of the administrative staff, some of whom are 
located in offices on the fifth and eleventh floors. A mimeograph room, set 
up by the Nursing Service Division, is also located on the eleventh floor. 

Organization of Hospital Floors 

As each floor of the new Main Building aceommndates approximately 
two hundred and fifty patients, careful staff assignment was needed in the 
distribution of nursing service. At present, a Sister Supervisor is respon- 
sible for the supervision of an entire floor in the day; she is assisted Ijy an 
Assistant Supervisor from two-thirty to eleven o'clock; a Night Supervisor is 
in charge of the floor from eleven o'clock to seven the toUowinf; morning. 
The floors are divided into units according to the proximity of wards. The 
largest units accommodate about fifty patients; the smallest, twenty-five. 
These units are under the charge of Head Nurses who are directly respon- 
sible to the Sister Supervisors. 

The actual nursing in the ward units is carried on l»y General Staff 
Nurses and Student Nurses under the direction of the Head Nurse and 
Sister Supervisor. Subsidiary Workers, ward helpers and orderlies, perform 
non-nursing duties under the diection of the nursing staff. They also carry 
on certain cleaning duties, though the heavy cleaning nf the hospital is 
assigned to the Housekeeping Department. 



124 CHARITY HOSPITAL— M89-1940 

A definite effort has been made to relieve nurses of non-professional 
tasks. The divisions which will be described in the following subtopics, 
show that they have definitely been freed from many activities which for- 
merly prevented their giving full time to nursing duties. 

Central Service Room System 

The Central Service Department has stated its purpose as follows: "To 
give eflicieat and economical service to the physician and to the nurse by 
supplying all necessary equipment needed in the care of the patient." 
Through this department a centralized control is exerted over medical and 
surgical supplies, and also over household and stationery supplies. 

The main unit of the Central Service Room System is located on the 
twelfth floor of the Main Hospital Building. Dispensing units are located 
at the center of each floor. Ordinary equipment and supplies necessary for 
the type of service on the floor are kept in the dispensing unit. Through 
a. system of exchange at regular intervals, sterile material is given out from 
the mam umt where ail wrapping and sterilixing is done. All Central 
faervice rooms are open both day and night. 

The Central Service units are all staffed with nurses and messengers 
responsiDle to a Sister Superivsor. While nurses are responsible tor the 
setting up of trays and general management of the units, messengers carry 
equipment as needed to the ward units, transport patients, deliver supplies. 

The Central Service Room System has three main advantages: (1) it 
relieves nurses of technical work connected with the care of equipment; 
I ■ '* ^" economical measure as it provides a definite control over the 
ordering, dispensing, and care of equipment and supplies; (3) it standard- 
izes equipment in the hospital. 

Sewing Room and Central Linen Room 

The Sewing Room makes all hospital linens and is responsible for the 
reconditioning of torn linens. The Supervisor of the Sewing Room also 
directs the Central Linen Room whicli receives the linen from the laundry 
and distributes it to the ward units, according to the daily census. 

The mam units of the Sewing and Linen Departments are located in 
the bi^ement. Wing linen rooms on each hospital floor are stocked with 
Imen daily for rooming changes, bnt emergency supplies of linen arc kept 
in (he Central Seri'ice rooms. 

The centralization of the linen department has provided a means for 
a more debnite control over the distribution of linens. The nursing staff 
has thus been relieved of the necessity of maintaining and distributing the 
linen supply for then- floors. 

Admitting Room, Admission Bathrooms, and Patients' Clothes Room 

With the ripening of the new hospital, the Nursing Service Division took 
over the nursing^ care of patients in the .'Vdraitting Room. The Admission 
Bathrooms and Central Patients' Clothes Room were also staffed by Nursing 
Service. All of these uniu function under the same Sister Supervisor. 

The Admission Bathrooms and Patientii' Clothes Rooms relieve the 
nurses on the wards of the greatest share of the rcsponsibUiry for checking 
the clothing and valuables of new patients, and of giving admission baths. 
Patients' clothing is carefully checked, and cleaned when badly soiled, before 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 125 

storage. When necessary, clothing is replaced. These two units are located 
in the basement directly under the Admitting Department. 

It need hardly be stated that these two departments have already 
proven their value to the hospital, both in the improved care of patitrits' 
clothes and valuables and in saving of nursing time on the floors. 

Gas Therapy Department 

Gas Therapy is one of the newer services available in the hospital tor 
tlie treatment of patients. The department functions under the general 
direction of the Assistant Director of the Hospital in charge of Medicine 
and is managed by a Chief Gas Therapist who is an anesthetist. The de- 
partment is responsible for the administration of therapeutic gases: oxygen, 
carbon dioxide, and helium oxygen. Anesthetists and trained technicians 
administer the gases. The hospital now owns a Drinker Respirator, which 
is operated by anesthetists under the direction of the Gas Therapy Depart- 
ment. 

Food Service 

Food service for patients was transferred to the Dietary Department 

upon our entrance to the new hospital. A Dietitian is now in charge of 
each large ward pantry at the center of each floor, from which special 
diets are also served. Nurses assist in the serving of the riiet to the patient, 
and are responsible for handling of feeding problems arising on the warti 
units. Such a cooperative arrangement with the Dietary Department has 
resulted in a greatly improved food service. 

Clerical Workers 

The physical arrangement of the floors of the new hospital necessitated 
the employment of clerical workers to relieve nurses of the responsibility for 
answering outside telephone calls, giving out information, and other such 
duties. As all outside telephone connections arc located in the Supcrv'isor's 
Office on the center of each wing, it was necessary to assign about thirty 
so-called "Ward Clerks" to these offices. This action has been of a great 
deal of benefit to Nursing Service, for in addition to the tasks mentioned 
above, these ward clerks direct visitors, relay messages, and perform many 
other non-nursing duties. 

Subsidiary Workers 

The program for subsidiary workers, begun in April ISaO. has contiuueil 
with success during this past year. The duties of this group have been 
carefully outlined, and a teaching program has been continued for new 
workers. A male nurse was employed in July 1939, (o supervise the pro- 
gram for orderlies; he resisned in March nf HMO, and so far, he has not 
been replaced, though we feel that a male nurse is needed to carry on this 
supervisory program. A formal course for these workers is not in effect. 
The majority of the subsidiary workers were supplied with uniforms during 
the past year through the generosity of the hospital adinitiiBtralor.";. Phiiiv 
are underway to issue a Handbook for Subsidiary Workers in the nc;ir 
future and to institute an apprenticeship program for new employees. 

Staff Education Program 

In spite of the many duties attendant upon moving and readjustment, 
the Nursing Department carried on a staff education program this past 
year which has been productive of good results. In order to establish uni- 



126 CHAEITY HOSPITAL^I939-1940 

form uursiiig procedures tbroughout the bospital, a revision of nursing pro- 
cedures was carried on through the year. All nurses attended weetljf demon- 
strations of the revised procedures. A Procedure Book was written in two 
volumes, Basic and Advanced, and this was placed in each Ward Unit. 

A Nursing Service Policy Book was also begun this spring for the 
benefit of aU nurses, and these have been placed in the Supervisor's Office 
on each floor. Statements of policies governing nurses, as well as policies 
describing interdepartmental relations, are included in the Policy Book. 

Through a program of weekly supervisorj' meetings a unified program 
of supervision has been initiated. Head Nurse meetings have been held 
weekly or biweekly on the various floors to build up a stronger program of 
teaching and supervision. Close contact has been maintained with the 
Nursing Service administrative staff through a system of reporting and 
through supervisory rounds from Nursing Ser\'ice Office. 

Nursing Service Statistics 

The nursing service staff has increased during this past year, though 
the number, of personnel is stiU far from adecjuate. Our report for 1939 
staled that there was on July 1, a total of 570 nurses on the staff, including 
both graduate and student nurses. This year finds a total of 659. of whom 
IdO are mcluded in the administrative and supervisory group, 14 arc 
anesthetists, 241 are general staff nurses, and 274 are students. Subsidiary 
workers number .503, 212 being male workers and 291, female. Clerical 
workers m Nursing Service Offices and allied offices number 19, while there 
are IH ward clerks Stationed in the Supervisors' Offices on the hospital 
floors. 

Approximately 7CfO requests were received in the Nursing Service 
Division for niforraation regarding employment on our nursing staff. A total 
of 2J8 employments were made during this past year, of whom 167 were 
replacements and 71, additional workers. There has been a very rapid turn- 
over of graduate nurses, an average of 14 resignations having been accepted 
monthly. An analysis of the reasons alleged for leaving our employ follows; 

Reasons Given for Resigning (in order of frequency) 

1. To accept better position 77 

2. To be married 26 

3. Illness . _ , 18 

4. To enter private duty 15 

5. Home responsibilities „ .13 
fi. To take postgraduate work 11 
7. Miscellaneous .... fl 



Tota! .^..16? 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Courses Offered 

The School of Nursing continues to offer courses to both graduate and 
student nurses. It is anticipated that with the improved facilities of the 
new hospital, it will soon be possible to offer more postgraduate cour.ses to 
nurses desiring advanced work in the specialties. 

The largest enrollment of the school is still in the three year course 
leading to the diploma. Five students are enrolled in the comhined collegiate 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 127 

and professional course (the "five year course"), which is offered through 
affiliation with Louisiana State University, 

A closer working relationship was established with the Medical School of 
the Louisiana State University during this past year. Sixty-five students ore 
HOW enrolled in the summer session which is being conducted in the Nurses' 
Residence, and six nurses are candidates for degree at the end of this session. 
It is hoped that after the major reorgauiaation program, necessitated by our 
entrance into the new hospital, is well underway, we may push forward with 
u fiilltime university program in Nursing Education. 

Postgraduate students are still accepted for a General Supplementary 
or Review Course of six months, and for the three months course in Oper- 
ating Room Technique. The course in Anesthe.«;ia has been lengthened to 
eight months and has been greatly enriched by an integrated theoretical 
course conducted under the guidance of an Kducational Director in the 
School of Anesthesia. 

Affiliation is still maintained with many southern schools of nursing, 
and practically all types of experience are made available to students of 
sinaUer accredited schools needing additional services. 

Improvemeats 

The School of Nursing has taken up headquarters in the new Nurses' 
Residence which has given increased space and facilities. The residence 
serves both as a dormitory and as an educational unit. Ample office space, 
an excellent library', and fair recreational facilities have been provided. 
Classrooms are not adequate, however, and space has already been laken in 
the hospital for the teaching of Principles and Practice of Nursing. We si ill 
continue to use the laboratories of the Louisiana State University Medical 
School for the leaching of science courses, as science laboratories were not 
included in the residence, A registrar's office has been opened which is of 
great value. Although a kitchen and cafeteria are provided in the liase- 
ment, we have not been able to use these as the personnel needed to operate 
them has not been available. 

The faculty was enlarged this past year by the addition of another 
Assistant Director of Clinical Instruction, who was recently assigned to the 
Out-Patieni Department where she will work with the Director in setting 
up ft teaching program for students. A second Assistant in Nursing Service 
was also named this year. Through the efforts of our new inslruclor in 
Nursing Arts, a program for the preparation of young instructor.s (iir the 
course in Principles and Practice of Nursing has been initiated. Practice 
Teaching was also carried on by seven of our university students Ihi.s year 
under the direction of one of the Assistant Directors of the School. Plans 
for this coming year include the appointment of four additional assistants 
to the Nursing Arts instructional staff. 

Accreditation 

Application has been made with the National League of Nursing Kdu- 
cation for accreditation of our school of nursing and word has been received 
that the school will be surveyed in the fall of I&IO. It is our earnest desire 
to have our school included on the first list of approved schools of nursing 
to be published by this body. 

Statistics 

Two hundred and seventy-four students are enrolled in the .School of 
Nursing on July 1, 1040. This number is divided as follows; 207 Charity 



128 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1989-1940 

Hospital studeats, 30 affiliating students, 18 postgraduate students, and 19 
anesthesia students. One hundred and eleven students were admitted in 
September, 1939, and 63 students were granted the diploma of the school at 
the formal graduating exercises in May, 1940. A total of 68 students were 
droijped or withdrew from the school during the past fiscal year. Affilia- 
tion is now maintained with eight southern schools and contracts of affilia- 
tion will soon be signed with two additional schools. The clerical staff of 
the school of nursing now numbers six fuUtime workers. One of the Assist- 
ant Directors functions as registrar of the school. 

HOUSEKEEPING DEPARTMENT 

New Section in Nursing Department 

In the old hospital, supervision of housekeeping was a part of the Super- 
visors* duties in the ward units. With entrance into our new building, 
housekeeping has been organized as a separate division, and is directed by a 
specially selected personnel, thus giving the Supervisors and Head Nurses 
more time tor nursing supervision. A certain amount of housekeeping is still 
being done by the ward service group, but duties are distinctly separated. 
The housekeeping group is responsible for the cleaning of floors and for 
high dusting in the ward units; cleaning of furniture and equipment is done 
by orderlies and ward helpers. 

Organvcation 

The function of the Housekeeping Department is to maintain cleanliness 
and order throughout the hospital and to give proper care and attention 
to furniture and eqtiipment. 

The personnel of the Housekeeping Department includes: (1) the Sister 
Director of Housekeeping who is responsible for the organization and 
administration of the department, and for the selection, discharge, and 
transfer of employees; !2) a housekeeper, her assistants, and a houseman 
whose duties consist of supervision and direction of the work of the house- 
keepiug personnel; (3) two foremen who supervise the maintenance of 
floors; and (4), porters and maids who do the actual cleaning. 

The Department is responsible for: (1) general cleaning and care of 
(umiture and equipment in the Ward Units, the Special Departments, and 
the Internes' Quarters; (2> floor maintenance; (3) extermination of insects 
and rodents. 

Achievements 

The organization of this new Department in our hospital is a step 
forward m promoting systematic working conditions. Some of our achieve- 
ments arc as follows: (1) AU porters and roaids in the ward units have a 
definitely outlined schedule of duties which provides uniform cleaning 
methods throughout the hospital. <2) A specially assigned porter or maid 
assumes the responsibility for all the housekeeping duties in the special 
departments. (2) General inspections are made several times a day by the 
supervisory personnel and new workers are given direct supervision and 
instructions. (4) A schedule for the cleaning, waxing, and polishing of 
noors has been successfully worked out. All corridors are cared for at night 
when most traffic is eliminated. Ward floors are done after 9:00 a. m., so 
as not to interfere with the early morning care of patients, 

OUTSTANDING PROBLEMS IN NURSING DEPARTMENT 

The outstanding need of the Nursing Department is an increased staff 
of nurses to properly care for patients. We are at present giving from si« 



NURSING DEPARTMENT 129 

tentlis o( en hour to one and two-tenths hours of nursing care to each 
patient in a twenty-four hour period, ivhen the minimum accepted standard 
is two hours. 

The need for raises in salary and a salary scale for oil workers in the 
Department is also acute. At present we are facing such a rapid turnover 
of niurses that it is impossible to keep a stable, experienced staff of nurses 
on duty in the hospital. Nurses can claim better salaries elsewhere and, 
consequently, they are resigning in great numbers. Female subsidiary 
workers who have been in our employ for ten years and longer are stili 
maJdng the low salary of thirty dollars monthly. 

More equipment and supplies of various kinds are p'eatly needed. One 
of the most dire and constant needs is an adequat<^ supply of linen. For 
a long time we have wished to set up a teaching program in the Dibcrt 
Tuberculosis Unit. This has been impossible because of the need for addi- 
tional plumbing and surgical gowns, necessary to introduce an aseptic 
technique, 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

We wish at this time to make certain recommendations which are urgent 
and pressing: 

1. An increased budget for the Nursing Department which will permit 
of the following: 

a. Needed salary raises for all workers in Che department, includ- 
ing nurses, subsidiary workers, and housekeeping personnel 

b. The establishment of a salary scale for aU employees based on 
classification of positions, experience, special preparation, and 
satisfactory work 

c. The employment of approximately four hundred and fifty addi- 
tional nurses, thirty-five subsidiary workers for ward service, 
and seventeen supervisors and tJcaners for the hou-sekceping 
division 

2. Additional equipment and supplies needed to render more efficient 
nursing service to patients and to properly clean and maintain our 
new hospital building. 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

We are grateful for the interest shown in the Nurising Department by 
the Hospital Administrators during this past year. We also appreciate the 
cooperation received from other hospital departments. Our gratitude is 
likewise e.xtended to all members of our faculty and to the medical staff 
who have participated in the teaching program of the school and who have 
given care to our sick nurses. Especially, do we wish to thank our entire 
personnel for their generous endurance of ihe heavy burdens imposed upon 
them during the moving period and following our entnuicc into the hospital. 
Our nurses can receive only commendation for the splendid spirit of scK- 
sacrifice and loyalty which they have displayed during this trj'ing time. 

Respectfully submitted, 
SISTER STANISLAUS. Director 
Department of Nursing 



July 1, 1840 



LIBRARY OF The: 
ORLEANS PARISH MEDICAL SOCIETY 



130 CHARITY HOSPITAL^1939-1940 

REPORT OF PHARMACIST 

July 3. 1940 
Dr. Roy W. Wright. Director 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana at 
New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Dear Dr. Wright; 

The foUowing is the report of tie Pharmacy Department for the year 
ending June 30, 1940: 

Special Prescriptions filled 54,350 

Narcotic Prescriptions filled I."". ....I.. 5,920 

Stock Prescriptions filled.. .l"~~"""""""l"" 103,456 

Total-. __ 163,726 

SERUMS AND ANTITOXINS PURCHASED 

Anti-Dysenteric Senim 5 vials 

Anti-Influenza Serum __ _ 8 vials 

Ami- Meningococcic Scrum 30 ccIII'I 20^315 

AntiPneumococcic Serum Type 1—20,000 Units 261 vials 

Anti-lnenmococclc Scrum Type 2— 20,000 Units 15 vials 

Anti-lneumococcic Serum Type 3— 20,000 Units 280 vials 

Aut;-Pncumococcic Serum Type 4— 20,000 Units 125 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type .5— 20.000 Units - 105 vials 

Anti-PneuniQcoccic Serum Type &— 20.000 Units.. 110 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 7— 20.000 Units 198 vials 

Anti Piitumococcic Serura Type »— 20,000 Units.. SO vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 9— 20.000 Units 20 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 10—20.000 Units. 30 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 11—20.000 Units.. _. IS vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 12—20.000 Units 30 vials 

AntJ-PneumocoecLc Serum Type 13—20,000 Units. 33 vials 

Anti-Pneuniococcic Serum Type 14— 20.000 Units 55 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Scrum Type 15 — 20,000 Units ... 10 vials 

Anti-Pncumococcic Serum Type 1&— 20,000 Units 10 vials 

Anti-Pncumococcic Serum Type 17—20,000 Units 10 N-ials 

.'V.nti-Pncumococcic Scrum Type 18— 20.000 Units 20 vials 

Anti-Piieumococcic Scrum Type 19— 20.000 Units .. 30 vials 

Anti-Pncumococcic Serum Type 20—20.000 Units -. 9 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 22—20,000 Units 33 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 23— 20.000 Units 15 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 24 — 20,000 Units 18 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 29—20,000 Units 20 vials 

Anti-Pneumococcic Serum Type 33—20,000 Units 10 vials 

Antivenin (Snake) 6 vials 

Anti-Streptococcic Serum.. 5 vials 

Anti-Tularemic Scrum,. 9 vials 

Catarrhal Vaccine 135 vials 

Cholera \'accine , 24 vials 

Coli Combined Vaccine ,S5 vials 

Diphtheria Antitoxin 10,000 Units 200 vials 

Diphtheria Antitoxin 20,000 Units 250 vials 

Dysentery Vaccine . 5 viats 

Erysipelas Antitoxin 18 vials 

Furunculosis Vaccine Sec 80 vials 

Furunculosis Vaccine 10 cc 40 vials 



REPORT OF PHARMCIST 



131 



Gas Gangrene Antitoxin , 82 vials 

Immune Globulin 10 vials 

Meningococcic Antitoxin _ 330 vials 

Mixed Vaccine Influenza 20 vials 

Mixed Vaccine Respiratory Infections 22 viais 

Pertussis Vacciue 23 vials 

Scarlet Fever Antitoxin Therapeutic H vials 

Small Pox V'accinc 5 vials 

Staphylococcic Antitoxin 20,000 Units 11 vials 

Staijliylo-Htrcpt Vacciire 9 vials 

Streptococcus Inimunogen . . 6 vials 

Streptococcus Vaccine S5 vials 

Tetanus Antitoxin 1,500 Units ..18,S0O viafs 

Tetanus Antitoxin 10,000 Units 70 vials 

Tetanus Antitoxin 20,000 Units 227 vials 

Tetanus Gas Gangrene Prophylactic 1,025 vials 

Typhoid H Antigen 2 cc 100 vials 

Typhoid Mixed Vaccine 2 cc ., 60 vials 

Typhoid Mixed Vaccine 10 cc 20 vials 

ARSPHENAMINES PURCHASED 

Bismarsen .20 gram 8 , 600 ampoules 

Mapharsen 1 dose amps. .04 gram 150 ampoules 

Mapharsen 10 dose amps. .04 gram 50 amiioules 

Mapharsen 1 dose amps. .06 gram 325 ampoules 

Mapharsen 10 dose amps. .06 gram 60 amjioules 

Nco arsphenamine .30 gram 1 ,500 ampoules 

Neo arsphcnamine .46 gram 700 ampoules 

Nco arsphenamine .60 gram 1 , 100 ampoules 

Neo arsphcnamine 3,00 gram 6,000 ampoules 

Sulpharspheuamine .20 gram 500 ampoules 

Tryparsamide 1.00 gram 60 ampoules 

Tryparsamide 2.00 gram 10 ampoules 

Tryparsamide 3.00 gram 100 ampoules 

Tryparsamide 60.00 gram 60 bottles 

INSULIN PURCHASED 

Insulin U-20-10 cc 310 vials 

Insulin U-40-10 cc 1,700 vials 

Insulin U-SO-IO cc 10 viaJs 

Protaniiiie Zinc Insulin U-40-10 cc 750 vials 

Zinc Crystalline Insulin U-40-10 cc 970 vials 



APLJ. 



Respectfully submitted, 
A. P. LAUVE 

Chief PharraacLst 



132 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1939-1940 

REPORT OF DIETARY DEPARTMENT 

Sister Euphemu Berniecb Overton 

Director and Administrative Dietitian Dietitian Dibert Tubercnloais Unit 

Mildred Rewerts Ouida Moore 

Assistant Administrative Dietitian Therapeutic Dietitian and 

Instructor in Nutrition 

WARD DIETITIANS 

Lottie Benedick, Supervisor 

Agnes Blazek Anna Margaret Lutz 

Mable CiNCOBKi Marjorie McOahey 

Constance Hayes Mabge Myers 

Isabella Humphries Mary Rooney 

Wilma Wenzel 



To the Board of Administrators and Doctor Roy W. Wright, Director, 
Charity Hospital of Louisiana et New Orleans. 

Gentlemen: 

The Annua] Report of the Dietary Department for the fiscal year 
beginning July 1, 1939, and ending June 30, 1940, is respectfully presented: 

REPORT OF ACTIVITIES 
The past year has been a history-making one as far as the Dietary 
Department is concemed^sinee it marks for us the complete break from 
the old and the beginning of the new department. With careful foresight, 
plans were laid in order that the department might really take its place as 
a practical and scientific unit in the new Hospital. The staff was increased, 
plans and systems were tried and chaUBcd, and (ricd again. The year 1940 
finds the department alert, functioning well, and steadily advancing toward 
its goal. The following resume of the Dietitians' duties, will give some idea 
of staff activities: 

The .\dministrative Assistant helps as far as possible with all 
administrative proWems. She has charge of all personnel, makes 
menus, supervises food preparation in the Main Kitchen, and food 
service in six dining rooms. Some idea of the size of the admin- 
istrative problem is gained from the statement that between 10,000 
and 12.000 meals are served from the kitchen daily. Approximately 
l.SoO personnel (doctors, nurses, and employees! are served at the 
noon meai alone. 

The Diet Kitchen Assistant has charge of the preparation 
of all special diets which require foods different from the regular — 
that is, low fats, diabetics, and salt free foods. As rapidly as possi- 
ble the serving of these special diets is being shifted to the ward 
pantries, and the Diet Kitchen is being used for special nourish- 
ments, necessary for individual patients. Diet Kitchen trays are 
set up and delivered to patients throughout the house. The Diet 
Kitchen Dietitian also conducts classes for the student nurses in 
Nutrition and Diet Therapy. Student nurses spend more than a 
month in this service, applying the theories learned in their classes. 

The Dietary Department a.sBumed complete control of the food 
service in the Dibert Tuberculosis Unit in April, .'^t that time 
a dietitian was given charge of all therapeutic and general diets, 



REPORT OP DIETITIAN 138 

a service to which the Dietary Department has heretofore been 
unable to give supervision. 

Ward Dietitians supervise the service of all regular trays on 
the floor pantries, and ail special diets not served by the Diet 
Kitchen. These include high and low caloric, salt poors, low resi- 
dues, ulcer management, softs, liquids, et cetera. Trays are sent 
out from the pantries systematically for each ward, and speciaJ 
trays are carefully marked to avoid error. Each dietitian endeav- 
ors to keep well informed concerning the condition of the patient, 
and to work with the doctor and nurses in speeding recovery. Each 
floor pantry is a unit in itself, and the dietitian guards carefully 
against waste or misuse of foods on her floor, and is also careful 
to see that irays are attractively prepared. Such checking would 
be impossible without her. 

The Formula Room is supervised each morning by one of the 
Ward Dietitians. She teaches student nurses to make formulae 
and understand their use, and works with the doctors to maintain 
high nutrition standards for infants. 

The Diabetic Clinic is also in charge of a Ward Dietitian. She 
instructs clinic patients according to doctors' orders and helps them 
with the tremendous task of adjusting diet orders to finaneial and 
physical problems at home. 

A total of 3,908,519 meals, including 156,829 special diets, were served by 
the department this year an increase of "15,911 meals over the year 19.18-1939. 
This is ati average increase of 1,962 meals served daily. 

The control of meals by meal tickets, begun May 1, is a definite 
accomplishment; however, there are certain disadvantages to this procedure, 
and the situation should be given careful study, due to the tact that 
accompanying raises in salarj' were not effective at the time of the meal 
reduction. 

The department anticipates another successful year, when established 
systems may be perfected, and when we may establish some much needed 
systems of control, not possible until now. We hope to increase our staff 
so that the wards may be better covered and full time may be given to 
clinic service. Five dietitians would he necessary to handle this work 
adequately. We hope to continue the stabilization of our employct-H so thai 
every detail of our system will be .louiid, and to further improve patient 
meals, so thai they may be an example to be followed by the patient at 
home. 

The foJlowing comparison of figures is indicative of the work that has 
been done in the past ten years, and since vitamins, proteins, and minerals, 
are the most costly foodstuffs, it is self-explanatory as to I he rise in the per 
capita meal cost; 

Charity Hospital Diet 





"Standard 


WAX 


193;> 


1940 


Calcium 


.68 grams 


.26 grams 


.-If 11 grams 


..S55 grams 


phosphorous 


1.32 


.50 


.586 


1.449 " 


Iron 


.01.50 " 


.00448 " 


,008 


.OUi) ■■ 


Calories 


2000 


900-1000 


1250 


1945 


Vitamins 


Adequate 


Very poor 


Poor 


Good 


Protein 


75 grams 


32 Krnros 


4,1 Rrains 


.W urams 


•Accepted Standards for Normal Adult Diet 


(Rose) 




Raw Food cost 


per 


1931 


19:m 


1940 


^.apita per meal 


.06 appros. 


.07 


.0925 



1S4 CHARITY HOSPITAL— 1339-1940 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

An adequate budget that will enable the Department to coniiaue the 
work so well commenced this past year, is again strongly recommended. It 
staff or patient count is increased and more meals are served, an increase in 
budget should be allowed on the basis of each meal served. 

A Formula Room and a Nurses' Pood Laboratory should be equipped. 
Neither of these units were planned or provided in the New Hospital, and 
they are both required, if we are to maintain standards in Nursing Educa- 
tion. The installation of these units will cost approximately $5,000.00. 

APPRECIATION 

We are grateful to our Director, and to the two Assistant Directors. 
for their efforts in our behalf this past vear. Gratitude is also extended to 
the Members of the Board, Sisters, Doctors, Nurses, and all Departments 
for their cooperation, interest, and support. 

Respectfully submitted, 

SISTER EUPHEMIA, 

Director. Dietary Department 



CONTAGIOUS UNIT 



135 



REPORT OF CONTAGIOUS UNIT 
July 1939 to Jun« 1940 



DlSEASSg 


CABEB 
ADMITTED 


DlSCaARGED 


DESERTED 


U BATHS 




WHITE 


COL. 


WHITB 


COL. 


WHITE 


COL. 


Chicken Pox 


143 

121 

6 

76 

120 

20 

402 

133 

70 

47 

90 

6 

1 

1 
64 
99 
31 
28 

107 
17 

150 
38 
71 

406 


58 

53 

.! 

2fl 
10 
67 
36 
18 
18 
25 
3 

1 
46 
55 
10 
12 
41 
12 
78 
13 
30 

220 


78 
49 

1 

7 
72 

1 

292 

102 

12 

29 

50 

1 


G 

5 


4 
3 


1 
...... 

2 

1 




Diphtheria. 

Encephalitis 


3 


Erj'sipelas 

Eye Cases. 

Hansen's Disease 


3 
4 

1 

10 

2 




1 

14 

1 

2 


...... 


Lues 

Measles 

Meaingitis— - 

Mumps . 


1 

2 

24 


3 

"if" 


Pertussis -. 


1 


3 

1 
1 


5 


Poliomyelitis,— 




Rabies -.. 

Sodoku (Rat Bite 
Fever) 








Scarlet Fever 

Strep. S. T— 


11 

47 

3 

7 
30 

2 

40 
20 
31 

132 


5 
9 

4 
5 
1 
2 
15 
1 
4 

31 


1 

1 

"i" 

1 






Tracheotomies-. - 

Tuleraraia 

Typhoid- — 

Typhus Fever .... 


7 

...... 


5 
2 
3 


Tuberculosis 

Vaginitis 


2 
2 
2 

7 
46 


5 


6 


Vincent's Ang 

Suspected of contagions 
diseases - 


1 
15 


1 
7 


TOTAL - 


2.245 


897 


1017 


116 


72 


06 



S, Fabeeoas, R. N.. B. S. 

Supervisor, Contagious Unit. 



INDEX 

"Bed Endowment" ___- „ _ . iii 

Board of Administrators . ... ~ — _ v 

Resident Staff _ _- — — vii 

Internes „ . , w 

Visiting Staff . xi 

Director's Statistical Report : 19 

Treasurer's Reports -______^^.^^^______^^-^— — — 28 

Cost Per Patient Day 36 

Cost Per Clinic Visit . 36 

Construction Account La.4529^D 37 

Bond Liquidation Account . ^ 38 

Djbert Endowment Fund , 38 

Donations ^ 42 

Real Estate _^____ 44 

Inventory 44 

New Equipment 45 

Pathological Department „__________ . 54 

X-Ray Department _ 65 

Heart Station ^ „ 86 



Physical Therapy Department , 68 

Hospital Guild . 74 

Out Patient Department , 76 

DepartmcJit of Allergy . 81 

Department of Anesthesia - — - 82 

Record Library 84 

Statistical Department ■ . - 86 



Operations, Accidents, etc. 105 

Social Service Department 109 

Nursing Department 122 

Pharmajcy ^ ^ 130 

Diatetic Department 132 

Contagious I'nit . — — 136